Tits Porno Gillian Lewis  nudes (97 photo), Facebook, cameltoe
Hacked Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (23 fotos), 2019, panties
Tits Porno Gillian Lewis  naked (33 pictures), iCloud, legs
Tits Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (62 images), YouTube, cameltoe
Paparazzi Porno Gillian Lewis  nudes (44 images), iCloud, panties
Selfie Porno Gillian Lewis nude (25 photo), Twitter, butt
Bikini Porno Gillian Lewis  nudes (63 fotos), Twitter, cleavage
Video Porno Gillian Lewis nude (12 photos), iCloud, panties
Boobs Porno Gillian Lewis  nude (43 pics), iCloud, swimsuit
Is a cute Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (59 foto), Instagram, panties
Selfie Porno Gillian Lewis  nudes (49 fotos), YouTube, braless
Gallery Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (26 pics), Snapchat, swimsuit
naked Porno Gillian Lewis (47 images) Sideboobs, Facebook, underwear
naked Porno Gillian Lewis (11 pics) Selfie, Facebook, panties
nudes Porno Gillian Lewis (78 photos) Leaked, Facebook, butt
naked Porno Gillian Lewis (99 fotos) Young, 2019, cameltoe
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (12 foto) Is a cute, Facebook, braless
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (34 foto) Gallery, 2017, lingerie
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (25 pictures) Sexy, 2019, bra
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (33 pictures) Video, 2016, panties
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (62 fotos) Tits, YouTube, braless

Porno Gillian Lewis nude (75 photo) Leaked, braless

English rock band

This article is about the band. For their eponymous first album, see Led Zeppelin (album). For other uses, see Led Zeppelin (disambiguation).

Led Zeppelin were an English rock band formed in London in 1968. The group consisted of guitarist Jimmy Page, singer Robert Plant, bassist/keyboardist John Paul Jones, and drummer John Bonham. Along with Black Sabbath and Deep Purple, the band's heavy, guitar-driven sound has led them to be cited as one of the progenitors of heavy metal. Their style drew from a wide variety of influences, including blues, psychedelia, and folk music.

After changing their name from the New Yardbirds, Led Zeppelin signed a deal with Atlantic Records that afforded them considerable artistic freedom. Although the group were initially unpopular with critics, they achieved significant commercial success with eight studio albums released over eleven years, from Led Zeppelin (1969) to In Through the Out Door (1979). Their untitled fourth studio album, commonly known as Led Zeppelin IV (1971) and featuring the song "Stairway to Heaven", is among the most popular and influential works in rock music, and it helped to secure the group's popularity.

Page wrote most of Led Zeppelin's music, particularly early in their career, while Plant generally supplied the lyrics. Jones' keyboard-based compositions later became central to the group's catalogue, which featured increasing experimentation. The latter half of their career saw a series of record-breaking tours that earned the group a reputation for excess and debauchery. Although they remained commercially and critically successful, their output and touring schedule were limited during the late 1970s, and the group disbanded following Bonham's death from alcohol-related asphyxia in 1980. In the decades that followed, the surviving members sporadically collaborated and participated in one-off Led Zeppelin reunions. The most successful of these was the 2007 Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert in London, with Jason Bonham taking his late father's place behind the drums.

Many critics consider Led Zeppelin to be one of the most successful, innovative, and influential rock groups in history. They are one of the best-selling music artists in the history of audio recording; various sources estimate the group's record sales at 200 to 300 million units worldwide. With RIAA-certified sales of 111.5 million units, they are the third-best-selling band in the US. Each of their nine studio albums placed in the top 10 of the Billboard album chart and six reached the number-one spot. They achieved eight consecutive UK number-one albums. Rolling Stone magazine described them as "the heaviest band of all time", "the biggest band of the Seventies", and "unquestionably one of the most enduring bands in rock history". They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995; the museum's biography of the band states that they were "as influential" during the 1970s as the Beatles were during the 1960s.

Contents

History[edit]

Formation[edit]

The name Led Zeppelin in irregular capitals in black and white
The band's logotype, used since 1973

In 1966, London-based session guitarist Jimmy Page joined the blues-influenced rock band the Yardbirds to replace bassist Paul Samwell-Smith. Page soon switched from bass to lead guitar, creating a dual lead guitar line-up with Jeff Beck. Following Beck's departure in October 1966, the Yardbirds, tired from constant touring and recording, began to wind down. Page wanted to form a supergroup with him and Beck on guitars, and the Who's Keith Moon and John Entwistle on drums and bass, respectively. Vocalists Steve Winwood and Steve Marriott were also considered for the project. The group never formed, although Page, Beck, and Moon did record a song together in 1966, "Beck's Bolero", in a session that also included bassist-keyboardist John Paul Jones.

The Yardbirds played their final gig in July 1968 at Luton College of Technology in Bedfordshire. They were still committed to several concerts in Scandinavia, so drummer Jim McCarty and vocalist Keith Relf authorised Page and bassist Chris Dreja to use "the Yardbirds" name to fulfill the band's obligations. Page and Dreja began putting a new line-up together. Page's first choice for the lead singer was Terry Reid, but Reid declined the offer and suggested Robert Plant, a singer for the Band of Joy and Hobbstweedle. Plant eventually accepted the position, recommending former Band of Joy drummer John Bonham. John Paul Jones inquired about the vacant position of bass guitarist at the suggestion of his wife after Dreja dropped out of the project to become a photographer.[nb 1] Page had known Jones since they were both session musicians and agreed to let him join as the final member.

A black and white photograph of an airship near a mooring mast exploding at its stern.
A 1937 photograph of the burning LZ 129 Hindenburg taken by news photographer Sam Shere, used on the cover of the band's debut album and extensively on later merchandise

The four played together for the first time in a room below a record store on Gerrard Street in London. Page suggested that they attempt "Train Kept A-Rollin'", originally a jump blues song popularised in a rockabilly version by Johnny Burnette, which had been covered by the Yardbirds. "As soon as I heard John Bonham play", Jones recalled, "I knew this was going to be great ... We locked together as a team immediately". Before leaving for Scandinavia, the group took part in a recording session for the P. J. Proby album, Three Week Hero. The album's track "Jim's Blues", with Plant on harmonica, was the first studio track to feature all four future members of Led Zeppelin.

The band completed the Scandinavian tour as the New Yardbirds, playing together for the first time in front of a live audience at Gladsaxe Teen Clubs in Gladsaxe, Denmark, on 7 September 1968. Later that month, they began recording their first album, which was based on their live set. The album was recorded and mixed in nine days, and Page covered the costs. After the album's completion, the band were forced to change their name after Dreja issued a cease and desist letter, stating that Page was allowed to use the New Yardbirds moniker for the Scandinavian dates only. One account of how the new band's name was chosen held that Moon and Entwistle had suggested that a supergroup with Page and Beck would go down like a "lead balloon", an idiom for disastrous results. The group dropped the 'a' in lead at the suggestion of their manager, Peter Grant, so that those unfamiliar with the term would not pronounce it "leed". The word "balloon" was replaced by "zeppelin", a word which, according to music journalist Keith Shadwick, brought "the perfect combination of heavy and light, combustibility and grace" to Page's mind.

In November 1968, Grant secured a 3,000 advance contract from Atlantic Records, which was then the biggest deal of its kind for a new band. Atlantic were a label with a catalogue of mainly blues, soul, and jazz artists, but in the late 1960s they began to take an interest in British progressive rock acts. Record executives signed Led Zeppelin without having ever seen them. Under the terms of their contract, the band had autonomy in deciding when they would release albums and tour, and had the final say over the contents and design of each album. They would also decide how to promote each release and which tracks to release as singles. They formed their own company, Superhype, to handle all publishing rights.

Early years: 1968–1970[edit]

The band began their first tour of the UK on 4 October 1968, still billed as the New Yardbirds; they played their first show as Led Zeppelin at the University of Surrey in Battersea on 25 October.[20] Tour manager Richard Cole, who would become a major figure in the touring life of the group, organised their first North American tour at the end of the year.[nb 2] Their debut album, Led Zeppelin, was released in the US during the tour on 12 January 1969, and peaked at number 10 on the Billboard chart; it was released in the UK, where it peaked at number 6, on 31 March. According to Steve Erlewine, the album's memorable guitar riffs, lumbering rhythms, psychedelic blues, groovy, bluesy shuffles and hints of English folk, made it "a significant turning point in the evolution of hard rock and heavy metal".

A colour photograph of a stone cottage on a hill
Bron-Yr-Aur, near Machynlleth, the Welsh cottage to which Page and Plant retired in 1970 to write many of the tracks that appeared on the band's third and fourth albums

In their first year, Led Zeppelin completed four US and four UK concert tours, and also released their second album, Led Zeppelin II. Recorded mostly on the road at various North American studios, it was an even greater commercial success than their first album, and reached the number one chart position in the US and the UK. The album further developed the mostly blues-rock musical style established on their debut release, creating a sound that was "heavy and hard, brutal and direct", and which would be highly influential and frequently imitated. Steve Waksman has suggested that Led Zeppelin II was "the musical starting point for heavy metal".

The band saw their albums as indivisible, complete listening experiences, disliking the re-editing of existing tracks for release as singles. Grant maintained an aggressive pro-album stance, particularly in the UK, where there were few radio and TV outlets for rock music. Without the band's consent, however, some songs were released as singles, particularly in the US. In 1969 an edited version of "Whole Lotta Love", a track from their second album, was released as a single in the US. It reached number four in the Billboard chart in January 1970, selling over one million copies and helping to cement the band's popularity. The group also increasingly shunned television appearances, citing their preference that their fans hear and see them in live concerts.

Following the release of their second album, Led Zeppelin completed several more US tours. They played initially in clubs and ballrooms, and then in larger auditoriums as their popularity grew. Some early Led Zeppelin concerts lasted more than four hours, with expanded and improvised live versions of their repertoire. Many of these shows have been preserved as bootleg recordings. It was during this period of intensive concert touring that the band developed a reputation for off-stage excess.[nb 3]

In 1970, Page and Plant retired to Bron-Yr-Aur, a remote cottage in Wales, to commence work on their third album, Led Zeppelin III. The result was a more acoustic style that was strongly influenced by folk and Celtic music, and showcased the band's versatility. The album's rich acoustic sound initially received mixed reactions, with critics and fans surprised at the turn from the primarily electric arrangements of the first two albums, further fuelling the band's hostility to the musical press. It reached number one in the UK and US charts, but its stay would be the shortest of their first five albums. The album's opening track, "Immigrant Song", was released as a US single in November 1970 against the band's wishes, reaching the top twenty on the Billboard chart.

"The Biggest Band in the World": 1971–1975[edit]

Four symbols representing the four members of Led Zeppelin in a horizontal row
The four symbols on the label and inside sleeve of Led Zeppelin IV, representing (from left to right) Page, Jones, Bonham, and Plant

During the 1970s, Led Zeppelin reached new heights of commercial and critical success that made them one of the most influential groups of the era, eclipsing their earlier achievements. The band's image also changed as the members began to wear elaborate, flamboyant clothing, with Page taking the lead on the flamboyant appearance by wearing a glittering moon-and-stars outfit. Led Zeppelin changed their show by using things such as lasers, professional light shows and mirror balls. They began travelling in a private jet airliner, a Boeing 720 (nicknamed the Starship), rented out entire sections of hotels (including the Continental Hyatt House in Los Angeles, known colloquially as the "Riot House"), and became the subject of frequently repeated stories of debauchery. One involved John Bonham riding a motorcycle through a rented floor of the Riot House, while another involved the destruction of a room in the Tokyo Hilton, leading to the group being banned from that establishment for life. Although Led Zeppelin developed a reputation for trashing their hotel suites and throwing television sets out of the windows, some suggest that these tales have been exaggerated. According to music journalist Chris Welch, "[Led Zeppelin's] travels spawned many stories, but it was a myth that [they] were constantly engaged in acts of wanton destruction and lewd behaviour".

Led Zeppelin released their fourth album on 8 November 1971. In response to the treatment they had received from critics, particularly after Led Zeppelin III, the band decided to release the fourth album with no title, though it is variously referred to as Led Zeppelin IV, Untitled, IV, or, due to the four symbols appearing on the record label, as Four Symbols, Zoso or Runes. In addition to lacking a title, the original cover featured no band name, as the group wished to be anonymous and to avoid easy pigeonholing by the press. With 37 million copies sold, Led Zeppelin IV is one of the best-selling albums in history, and its massive popularity cemented Led Zeppelin's status as superstars in the 1970s. By 2006, it had sold 23 million copies in the United States alone. The track "Stairway to Heaven", never released as a single, was the most requested and most played song on American rock radio in the 1970s.[49] The group followed up the album's release with tours of the UK, Australasia, North America, Japan, and the UK again from late 1971 through early 1973.

A black and white photograph of Robert Plant with a tambourine and Jimmy Page with an acoustic guitar seated and performing.
Plant and Page perform acoustically in Hamburg in March 1973, just before the release of the band's fifth album, Houses of the Holy

Led Zeppelin's next album, Houses of the Holy, was released in March 1973. It featured further experimentation by the band, who expanded their use of synthesisers and mellotron orchestration. The predominantly orange album cover, designed by the London-based design group Hipgnosis, depicts images of nude children climbing the Giant's Causeway in Northern Ireland. Although the children are not shown from the front, the cover was controversial at the time of the album's release. As with the band's fourth album, neither their name nor the album title was printed on the sleeve.

Houses of the Holy topped charts worldwide, and the band's subsequent concert tour of North America in 1973 broke records for attendance, as they consistently filled large auditoriums and stadiums. At Tampa Stadium in Florida, they played to 56,800 fans, breaking the record set by the Beatles' 1965 Shea Stadium concert and grossing 9,000. Three sold-out shows at Madison Square Garden in New York City were filmed for a motion picture, but the theatrical release of this project (The Song Remains the Same) was delayed until 1976. Before the final night's performance, 0,000 of the band's money from gate receipts was stolen from a safe deposit box at the Drake Hotel.

A colour photograph of the four members of Led Zeppelin performing onstage, with some other figures visible in the background.

In 1974, Led Zeppelin took a break from touring and launched their own record label, Swan Song, named after an unreleased song. The record label's logo, based on a drawing called Evening: Fall of Day (1869) by William Rimmer, features a picture of Apollo. The logo can be found on Led Zeppelin memorabilia, especially T-shirts. In addition to using Swan Song as a vehicle to promote their own albums, the band expanded the label's roster, signing artists such as Bad Company, the Pretty Things and Maggie Bell. The label was successful while Led Zeppelin existed, but folded less than three years after they disbanded.

In 1975, Led Zeppelin's double album Physical Graffiti was their first release on the Swan Song label. It consisted of fifteen songs, of which eight had been recorded at Headley Grange in 1974 and seven had been recorded earlier. A review in Rolling Stone magazine referred to Physical Graffiti as Led Zeppelin's "bid for artistic respectability", adding that the only bands Led Zeppelin had to compete with for the title "The World's Best Rock Band" were the Rolling Stones and the Who. The album was a massive commercial and critical success. Shortly after the release of Physical Graffiti, all previous Led Zeppelin albums simultaneously re-entered the top-200 album chart, and the band embarked on another North American tour, now employing sophisticated sound and lighting systems. In May 1975, Led Zeppelin played five sold-out nights at the Earls Court Arena in London, at the time the largest arena in Britain.

Hiatus from touring and return: 1975–1977[edit]

A colour photograph of Robert Plant with microphone and Jimmy Page with a double necked guitar performing on stage.
Plant and Page performing in Chicago Stadium in Chicago on 10 April 1977, during Led Zeppelin's last North American tour.

Following their triumphant Earls Court appearances, Led Zeppelin took a holiday and planned an autumn tour in America, scheduled to open with two outdoor dates in San Francisco. In August 1975, however, Plant and his wife Maureen were involved in a serious car crash while on holiday in Rhodes, Greece. Plant suffered a broken ankle and Maureen was badly injured; a blood transfusion saved her life. Unable to tour, he headed to the Channel Island of Jersey to spend August and September recuperating, with Bonham and Page in tow. The band then reconvened in Malibu, California. During this forced hiatus much of the material for their next album, Presence, was written.

By this time, Led Zeppelin were the world's number one rock attraction, having outsold most bands of the time, including the Rolling Stones.Presence, released in March 1976, marked a change in the Led Zeppelin sound towards more straightforward, guitar-based jams, departing from the acoustic ballads and intricate arrangements featured on their previous albums. Though it was a platinum seller, Presence received a mixed reaction among fans and the music press, with some critics suggesting that the band's excesses may have caught up with them. Page had begun using heroin during recording sessions for the album, a habit which may have affected the band's later live shows and studio recordings, although he has since denied this.

Because of Plant's injuries, Led Zeppelin did not tour in 1976. Instead, the band completed the concert film The Song Remains the Same and the accompanying soundtrack album. The film premiered in New York City on 20 October 1976, but was given a lukewarm reception by critics and fans. The film was particularly unsuccessful in the UK, where, unwilling to tour since 1975 because of their tax exile status, Led Zeppelin faced an uphill battle to recapture the public's affection.

a colour photograph of a large domed stadium
The Pontiac Silverdome, Michigan, where the band set a record for the largest solo indoor attraction in 1977 with an attendance of 76,229

In 1977, Led Zeppelin embarked on another major concert tour of North America. The band set another attendance record, with an audience of 76,229 at their Silverdome concert on 30 April. It was, according to the Guinness Book of Records, the largest attendance to that date for a single act show. Although the tour was financially profitable, it was beset by off-stage problems. On 19 April, over 70 people were arrested as about 1,000 fans tried to gatecrash Cincinnati Riverfront Coliseum for two sold-out concerts, while others tried to gain entry by throwing rocks and bottles through glass doors. On 3 June, a concert at Tampa Stadium was cut short because of a severe thunderstorm, despite tickets indicating "Rain or Shine". A riot broke out, resulting in arrests and injuries.

After the 23 July show at the Day on the Green festival at the Oakland Coliseum in Oakland, California, Bonham and members of Led Zeppelin's support staff were arrested after a member of promoter Bill Graham's staff was badly beaten during the band's performance. The following day's second Oakland concert was the group's final live appearance in the United States. Two days later, as they checked in at a French Quarter hotel for their 30 July performance at the Louisiana Superdome, Plant received news that his five-year-old son, Karac, had died from a stomach virus. The rest of the tour was immediately cancelled, prompting widespread speculation about Led Zeppelin's future.

Bonham's death and break-up: 1978–1980[edit]

A black and white photograph of John Bonham playing drums
After the death of Bonham (pictured in July 1973) on 25 September 1980, the remaining members of Led Zeppelin decided to disband the group.

In November 1978, the group recorded at Polar Studios in Stockholm, Sweden. The resulting album, In Through the Out Door, featured sonic experimentation that again drew mixed reactions from critics. Nevertheless, the album reached number one in the UK and the US in just its second week of release. With this album's release, Led Zeppelin's entire catalogue returned to the Billboard Top 200 in the weeks of 27 October and 3 November 1979.

In August 1979, after two warm-up shows in Copenhagen, Led Zeppelin headlined two concerts at the Knebworth Music Festival, playing to a crowd of approximately 104,000 on the first night. A brief, low-key European tour was undertaken in June and July 1980, featuring a stripped-down set without the usual lengthy jams and solos. On 27 June, at a show in Nuremberg, Germany, the concert came to an abrupt halt in the middle of the third song, when Bonham collapsed onstage and was rushed to hospital. Speculation in the press suggested that his collapse had been the result of excessive alcohol and drug use, but the band claimed that he had simply overeaten.

A North American tour, the band's first since 1977, was scheduled to commence on 17 October 1980. On 24 September, Bonham was picked up by Led Zeppelin assistant Rex King to attend rehearsals at Bray Studios. During the journey, Bonham asked to stop for breakfast, where he downed four quadruple vodkas (from 16 to 24 US fl oz (470 to 710 ml)), with a ham roll. After taking a bite of the ham roll he said to his assistant, "breakfast". He continued to drink heavily after arriving at the studio. The rehearsals were halted late that evening and the band retired to Page's house—the Old Mill House in Clewer, Windsor.

After midnight, Bonham, who had fallen asleep, was taken to bed and placed on his side. At 1:45 pm the next day, Benji LeFevre (Led Zeppelin's new tour manager) and John Paul Jones found Bonham dead. The cause of death was asphyxiation from vomit; the finding was accidental death.[81][82] An autopsy found no other recreational drugs in Bonham's body. Although he had recently begun to take Motival (a cocktail of the antipsychotic fluphenazine and the tricyclic antidepressant nortriptyline) to combat his anxiety, it is unclear if these substances interacted with the alcohol in his system.[83][84] Bonham's remains were cremated and his ashes interred on 12 October 1980, at Rushock parish church, Worcestershire.

The planned North American tour was cancelled, and despite rumours that Cozy Powell, Carmine Appice, Barriemore Barlow, Simon Kirke, or Bev Bevan would join the group as his replacement, the remaining members decided to disband. A 4 December 1980 press statement stated that, "We wish it to be known that the loss of our dear friend, and the deep sense of undivided harmony felt by ourselves and our manager, have led us to decide that we could not continue as we were."[82] The statement was signed simply "Led Zeppelin".

Post-breakup[edit]

1980s[edit]

A colour photograph of Jimmy Page performing on stage with a double-necked guitar

Following Zeppelin's dissolution, the first significant project for the members was the Honeydrippers, which Plant initially formed in 1981, and which released its only album in 1984. The group featured Page on lead guitar, along with studio musicians and friends of the pair, including Jeff Beck, Paul Shaffer, and Nile Rodgers. Plant focused on a different direction from Zeppelin, playing standards and in a more R&B style, highlighted by a cover of "Sea of Love" that peaked at number three on the Billboard chart in early 1985.

Coda – a collection of Zeppelin outtakes and unused tracks – was issued in November 1982. It included two tracks from the Royal Albert Hall in 1970, one each from the Led Zeppelin III and Houses of the Holy sessions, and three from the In Through the Out Door sessions. It also featured a 1976 Bonham drum instrumental with electronic effects added by Page, called "Bonzo's Montreux".

On 13 July 1985, Page, Plant, and Jones reunited for the Live Aid concert at JFK Stadium, Philadelphia, playing a short set featuring drummers Tony Thompson and Phil Collins, and bassist Paul Martinez. Collins had contributed to Plant's first two solo albums while Martinez was a member of Plant's solo band. The performance was marred by a lack of rehearsal with the two drummers, Page's struggles with an out-of-tune guitar, poorly functioning monitors, and Plant's hoarse voice. Page described the performance as "pretty shambolic", while Plant characterised it as an "atrocity".

The three members reunited again on 14 May 1988, for the Atlantic Records 40th Anniversary concert, with Bonham's son Jason on drums. The result was again disjointed: Plant and Page had argued immediately prior to taking the stage about whether to play "Stairway to Heaven", and Jones' keyboards were absent from the live television feed. Page described the performance as "one big disappointment" and Plant said "the gig was foul".

1990s[edit]

A colour photograph of Jason Bonham playing drums
Jason Bonham, who filled his late father's position for reunions in 1988, 1995 and 2007

The first Led Zeppelin box set, featuring tracks remastered under Page's supervision, was released in 1990 and bolstered the band's reputation, leading to abortive discussions among members about a reunion. This set included four previously unreleased tracks, including a version of Robert Johnson's "Travelling Riverside Blues". The song peaked at number seven on the Billboard Album Rock Tracks chart. 1992 saw the release of the "Immigrant Song"/"Hey, Hey, What Can I Do" (the original B-side) as a CD single in the US.[citation needed]Led Zeppelin Boxed Set 2 was released in 1993; the two box sets together contained all known studio recordings, as well as some rare live tracks.

In 1994, Page and Plant reunited for a 90-minute "UnLedded" MTV project. They later released an album called No Quarter: Jimmy Page and Robert Plant Unledded, which featured some reworked Led Zeppelin songs, and embarked on a world tour the following year. This is said to be the beginning of a rift between the band members, as Jones was not even told of the reunion.

In 1995, Led Zeppelin were inducted into the United States Rock and Roll Hall of Fame by Steven Tyler and Joe Perry of Aerosmith. Jason and Zoë Bonham also attended, representing their late father. At the induction ceremony, the band's inner rift became apparent when Jones joked upon accepting his award, "Thank you, my friends, for finally remembering my phone number", causing consternation and awkward looks from Page and Plant. Afterwards, they played one brief set with Tyler and Perry, with Jason Bonham on drums, and then a second with Neil Young, this time with Michael Lee playing the drums.

In 1997, Atlantic released a single edit of "Whole Lotta Love" in the US and the UK, the only single the band released in their homeland, where it peaked at number 21. November 1997 saw the release of Led Zeppelin BBC Sessions, a two-disc set largely recorded in 1969 and 1971. Page and Plant released another album called Walking into Clarksdale in 1998, featuring all new material, but after disappointing sales the partnership dissolved before a planned Australian tour.

2000s[edit]

A colour photograph of John Paul Jones, Robert Plant and Jimmy Page performing on stage, with Jason Bonham partially visible on drums in the background

2003 saw the release of the triple live album How the West Was Won, and Led Zeppelin DVD, a six-hour chronological set of live footage that became the best-selling music DVD in history. In July 2007, Atlantic/Rhino and Warner Home Video announced three Zeppelin titles to be released that November: Mothership, a 24-track best-of spanning the band's career; a reissue of the soundtrack The Song Remains the Same, including previously unreleased material; and a new DVD. Zeppelin also made their catalogue legally available for digital download, becoming one of the last major rock bands to do so.

On 10 December 2007, Zeppelin reunited for the Ahmet Ertegun Tribute Concert at the O2 Arena in London, with Jason Bonham again taking his father's place on drums. According to Guinness World Records 2009, the show set a record for the "Highest Demand for Tickets for One Music Concert" as 20 million requests were submitted online. Critics praised the performance and there was widespread speculation about a full reunion. Page, Jones and Jason Bonham were reported to be willing to tour, and to be working on material for a new Zeppelin project. Plant continued his touring commitments with Alison Krauss, stating in September 2008 that he would not record or tour with the band. "I told them I was busy and they'd simply have to wait," he recalled in 2014. "I would come around eventually, which they were fine with – at least to my knowledge. But it turns out they weren't. And what's even more disheartening, Jimmy used it against me."[113]

Jones and Page reportedly looked for a replacement for Plant; candidates including Steven Tyler of Aerosmith, and Myles Kennedy of Alter Bridge. However, in January 2009, it was confirmed that the project had been abandoned. "Getting the opportunity to play with Jimmy Page, John Paul Jones and Jason Bonham was pretty special," Kennedy recalled. "That is pretty much the zenith right there. That was a crazy, good experience. It's something I still think of often ... It's so precious to me."[116]

2010s and beyond[edit]

A film of the O2 performance, Celebration Day, premiered on 17 October 2012 and was released on DVD on 19 November. The film grossed  million in one night, and the live album peaked at number 4 and 9 in the UK and US, respectively. Following the film's premiere, Page revealed that he had been remastering the band's discography.[120] The first wave of albums, Led Zeppelin, Led Zeppelin II, and Led Zeppelin III, were released on 2 June 2014.[121] The second wave of albums, Led Zeppelin IV and Houses of the Holy, were released on 27 October 2014.[122]Physical Graffiti was released on 23 February 2015, almost exactly forty years to the day after the original release.[123] The fourth and final wave of studio album reissues, Presence, In Through the Out Door, and Coda, were released on 31 July 2015.[124]

Through this remastering project, each studio album was reissued on CD and vinyl and was also available in a Deluxe Edition, which contained a bonus disc of previously unheard material (Coda's Deluxe Edition would include two bonus discs). Each album was also available in a Super Deluxe Edition Box Set, which included the remastered album and bonus disc on both CD and 180-gram vinyl, a high-definition audio download card of all content at 96 kHz/24 bit, a hard bound book filled with rare and previously unseen photos and memorabilia, and a high quality print of the original album cover.[125]

On 6 November 2015, the Mothership compilation was reissued using the band's newly remastered audio tracks.[126] The reissuing campaign continued the next year with the re-release of BBC Sessions on 16 September 2016. The reissue contained a bonus disc with nine unreleased BBC recordings, including the heavily bootlegged but never officially released "Sunshine Woman".[127]

To commemorate the band's 50th anniversary, Page, Plant and Jones announced an official illustrated book celebrating 50 years since the formation of the band.[128] Also released for the celebration was a reissue of How the West Was Won on 23 March 2018, which includes the album's first pressing on vinyl.[129] For Record Store Day on 21 April 2018, Led Zeppelin released a 7" single "Rock and Roll" (Sunset Sound Mix)/"Friends" (Olympic Studio Mix), their first single in 21 years.[130]

Musical style[edit]

A black and white photograph of John Bonham wearing a headband and behind the cymbals of a drum kit
John Bonham, on stage in the US in 1973, whose aggressive drumming style was critical to the hard rock sound associated with the band

Led Zeppelin's music was rooted in the blues. The influence of American blues artists such as Muddy Waters and Skip James was particularly apparent on their first two albums, as was the distinct country blues style of Howlin' Wolf. Tracks were structured around the twelve-bar blues on every studio album except for one, and the blues directly and indirectly influenced other songs both musically and lyrically. The band were also strongly influenced by the music of the British, Celtic, and American folk revivals. Scottish folk guitarist Bert Jansch helped inspire Page, and from him he adapted open tunings and aggressive strokes into his playing. The band also drew on a wide variety of genres, including world music, and elements of early rock and roll, jazz, country, funk, soul, and reggae, particularly on Houses of the Holy and the albums that followed.

The material on the first two albums was largely constructed out of extended jams of blues standards and folk songs. This method led to the mixing of musical and lyrical elements of different songs and versions, as well as improvised passages, to create new material, but would lead to later accusations of plagiarism and legal disputes over copyright. Usually the music was developed first, sometimes with improvised lyrics that might then be rewritten for the final version of the song. From the visit to Bron-Yr-Aur in 1970, the songwriting partnership between Page and Plant became predominant, with Page supplying the music, largely via his acoustic guitar, and Plant emerging as the band's chief lyricist. Jones and Bonham then added to the material, in rehearsal or in the studio, as a song was developed. In the later stages of the band's career, Page took a back seat in composition and Jones became increasingly important in producing music, often composed on the keyboard. Plant would then add lyrics before Page and Bonham developed their parts.

A black and white photograph of Jimmy Page playing a double-necked guitar
Page with the double-neck Gibson EDS-1275 used for playing "Stairway to Heaven" among other songs live

Early lyrics drew on the band's blues and folk roots, often mixing lyrical fragments from different songs. Many of the band's songs dealt with themes of romance, unrequited love and sexual conquest, which were common in rock, pop and blues music. Some of their lyrics, especially those derived from the blues, have been interpreted as misogynistic. Particularly on Led Zeppelin III, they incorporated elements of mythology and mysticism into their music, which largely grew out of Plant's interest in legends and history. These elements were often taken to reflect Page's interest in the occult, which resulted in accusations that the recordings contained subliminal satanic messages, some of which were said to be contained in backmasking; these claims were generally dismissed by the band and music critics. The pastoral fantasies in Plant's songwriting were inspired by the landscape of the Black Country region and J. R. R. Tolkien high fantasy novel The Lord of the Rings. Susan Fast argues that as Plant emerged as the band's main lyricist, the songs more obviously reflected his alignment with the West Coast counterculture of the 1960s. In the later part of the band's career Plant's lyrics became more autobiographical, and less optimistic, drawing on his own experiences and circumstances.

According to musicologist Robert Walser, "Led Zeppelin's sound was marked by speed and power, unusual rhythmic patterns, contrasting terraced dynamics, singer Robert Plant's wailing vocals, and guitarist Jimmy Page's heavily distorted crunch". These elements mean that they are often cited as one of the progenitors of hard rock and heavy metal and they have been described as the "definitive heavy metal band", although the band members have often eschewed the label. Part of this reputation depends on the band's use of distorted guitar riffs on songs like "Whole Lotta Love" and "The Wanton Song". Often riffs were not doubled by guitar, bass and drums exactly, but instead there were melodic or rhythmic variations; as in "Black Dog", where three different time signatures are used. Page's guitar playing incorporated elements of the blues scale with those of eastern music. Plant's use of high-pitched shrieks has been compared to Janis Joplin's vocal technique.Robert Christgau found him integral to the group's heavy "power blues" aesthetic, functioning as a "mechanical effect" similarly to Page's guitar parts. While noting Plant "hints at real feeling" on some of their acoustic songs, Christgau believed he abandoned traditional blues singing's emphasis on emotional projection in favor of vocal precision and dynamics: "Whether he is mouthing sexist blues cliches or running through one of the band's half-audible, half-comprehensible ... lyrics about chivalry or the counter-culture, his voice is devoid of feeling. Like the tenors and baritones of yore, he wants his voice to be an instrument—specifically, an electric guitar." Bonham's drumming was noted for its power, his rapid rolls and his fast beats on a single bass drum; while Jones' basslines have been described as melodic and his keyboard playing added a classical touch to the band's sound.

At some deep level, Led Zeppelin's music is about the relationship between humanity and technology. Philosophically, the band prefers humanity pure and simple, but in practice it must realize its humanity technologically. That seems truer than most good-time pastoral fantasies.

—Robert Christgau, 1972

Led Zeppelin have been widely viewed as a hard rock band, although Christgau regarded them as art rock as well. According to popular music scholar Reebee Garofalo, "because hip critics could not find a constructive way of positioning themselves in relation to Led Zeppelin's ultra-macho presentation, they were excluded from the art rock category despite their broad range of influences." Christgau wrote in 1972, the band could be considered art rock because they "relate to rock and roll not organically but intellectually", idealizing the "amplified beat" as "a kind of formal challenge". Unlike their contemporaries in Jethro Tull and Yes, who use "the physical compulsion of beat and volume to involve the mind", Led Zeppelin "make body music of an oddly cerebral cast, arousing aggression rather than sexuality." As such, along with other second-generation English hard rock bands like Black Sabbath and Mott the Hoople, they can attract both intellectuals and working-class youths in "a strange potential double audience." Years later, In Through the Out Door's "tuneful synthesizer pomp" further confirmed for Christgau they were an art rock band.

Page stated that he wanted Led Zeppelin to produce music that had "light and shade". This began to be more clearly realised beginning with Led Zeppelin III, which made greater use of acoustic instruments. This approach has been seen as exemplified in the fourth album, particularly on "Stairway to Heaven", which begins with acoustic guitar and recorder and ends with drums and heavy electric sounds. Towards the end of their recording career, they moved to a more mellow and progressive sound, dominated by Jones' keyboard motifs. They also increasingly made use of various layering and production techniques, including multi-tracking and overdubbed guitar parts. Their emphasis on the sense of dynamics and ensemble arrangement has been seen as producing an individualistic style that transcends any single music genre. Ian Peddie argues that they were "... loud, powerful and often heavy, but their music was also humorous, self-reflective and extremely subtle".

A black and white photograph showing a headshot of Robert Plant with a microphone in hand
Plant, whose vocal style has been highly influential in rock music, on stage in New York City in 1973

Many have considered Led Zeppelin to be one of the most successful, innovative, and influential bands in the history of rock music. Rock critic Mikal Gilmore said, "Led Zeppelin—talented, complex, grasping, beautiful and dangerous—made one of the most enduring bodies of composition and performance in twentieth-century music, despite everything they had to overpower, including themselves".

Led Zeppelin have influenced hard rock and heavy metal bands such as Deep Purple,Black Sabbath,Rush,Queen,Aerosmith,[170]the Black Crowes,[171] and Megadeth as well as progressive metal bands like Tool and Dream Theater. They influenced some early punk and post-punk bands, among them the Ramones,Joy Division[176][177] and the Cult. They were also an important influence on the development of alternative rock, as bands adapted elements from the "Zeppelin sound" of the mid-1970s, including the Smashing Pumpkins,Nirvana,Pearl Jam, and Soundgarden. Bands and artists from diverse genres have acknowledged the influence of Led Zeppelin, such as Madonna,Shakira,Lady Gaga,Kesha,[189] and Katie Melua.

A red tinged photograph of John Paul Jones playing a bass guitar
Jones performing with the band in Mannheim, Germany in 1980 on their last tour

Led Zeppelin have been credited with a major impact on the nature of the music business, particularly in the development of album-orientated rock (AOR) and stadium rock. In 1988 John Kalodner, then-A&R executive of Geffen Records, remarked that "In my opinion, next to the Beatles they're the most influential band in history. They influence the way music is on records, AOR radio, concerts. They set the standards for the AOR-radio format with 'Stairway to Heaven,' having AOR hits without necessarily having Top 40 hits. They're the ones who did the first real big arena concert shows, consistently selling out and playing stadiums without support. People can do as well as them, but nobody surpasses them".Andrew Loog Oldham, the former producer and manager of the Rolling Stones, commented on how Led Zeppelin had a major influence on the record business, and the way rock concerts were managed and presented to huge audiences.

The band have sold over 200 million albums worldwide according to some sources, while others state that they have sold in excess of 300 million records, including 111.5 million certified units in the United States. According to the Recording Industry Association of America, Led Zeppelin are the second-highest-selling band, the fourth highest selling music act in the US, and one of only three acts to earn five or more Diamond albums. They achieved eight consecutive number-ones on the UK Albums Chart, a record for most consecutive UK number-one albums shared with ABBA.[197] Led Zeppelin remain one of the most bootlegged artists in the history of rock music.

Led Zeppelin also made a significant cultural impact. Jim Miller, editor of Rolling Stone Illustrated History of Rock & Roll, argues that "on one level, Led Zeppelin represents the final flowering of the sixties' psychedelic ethic, which casts rock as passive sensory involvement". Led Zeppelin have also been described as "the quintessential purveyors" of masculine and aggressive "cock rock", although this assertion has been challenged. The band's fashion-sense has been seminal; Simeon Lipman, head of pop culture at Christie's auction house, has commented that "Led Zeppelin have had a big influence on fashion because the whole aura surrounding them is so cool, and people want a piece of that". Led Zeppelin laid the foundation for the big hair of 1980s glam metal bands such as Mötley Crüe and Skid Row. Other musicians have also adapted elements from Led Zeppelin's attitude to clothes, jewellery and hair, such as the hipster flares and tight band T-shirts of Kings of Leon, shaggy hair, clingy T-shirts and bluesman hair of Jack White of the White Stripes, and Kasabian guitarist Sergio Pizzorno's silk scarves, trilbies and side-laced tight jeans.

Achievements[edit]

Main article: List of awards and nominations received by Led Zeppelin

Led Zeppelin have collected many honours and awards throughout the course of their career. They were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995, and the UK Music Hall of Fame in 2006. Among the band's awards are an American Music Award in 2005, and the Polar Music Prize in 2006. Led Zeppelin were the recipient of a Grammy Lifetime Achievement Award in 2005, and four of their recordings have been inducted into the Grammy Hall of Fame. They have been awarded five Diamond albums, as well as fourteen Multi-Platinum, four Platinum and one Gold album in the United States, while in the UK they have five Multi-Platinum, six Platinum, one Gold and four Silver albums. In addition to listing five of their albums among "the 500 Greatest Albums of All Time", Rolling Stone named Led Zeppelin the 14th-greatest artist of all time in 2004.

In 2005, Page was appointed an Officer of the Order of the British Empire in recognition of his charity work, and in 2009 Plant was honoured as a Commander of the Order of the British Empire for his services to popular music. The band are ranked number one on VH1's 100 Greatest Artists of Hard Rock and Classic Rock's "50 best live acts of all time". They were named as the best Rock band in a poll by BBC Radio 2.[214] They were awarded an Ivor Novello Award for "Outstanding Contribution to British Music" in 1977, as well as a "Lifetime Achievement Award" at the 42nd Annual Ivor Novello awards ceremony in 1997. The band were honoured at the 2008 MOJO Awards with the "Best Live Act" prize for their one-off reunion, and were described as the "greatest rock and roll band of all time". The three surviving members (Page, Plant, and Jones) were named as 2012 recipients of Kennedy Center Honors.

Discography[edit]

Main articles: Led Zeppelin discography and List of songs recorded by Led Zeppelin

Studio albums

Members[edit]

Band members

  • Robert Plant – lead vocals, harmonica, percussion
  • Jimmy Page – guitar, backing vocals
  • John Paul Jones – bass, keyboards, mandolin, backing vocals
  • John Bonham – drums, percussion, backing vocals

Live performance guests

See also[edit]

  1. ^ Dreja would later take the photograph that appeared on the back of Led Zeppelin's debut album.
  2. ^ The first show was in Denver on 26 December 1968, followed by other West Coast dates before the band travelled to California to play Los Angeles and San Francisco.
  3. ^ One alleged example of such extravagance was the shark episode said to have taken place at the Edgewater Inn in Seattle on 28 July 1969.

References[edit]

  1. ^ Led Zeppelin.com
  2. ^ "Monitor". Broadcasting. Washington, DC: Broadcasting Publications Inc. 12 November 1979.
  3. ^ Chris Welch (1994) Led Zeppelin, London: Orion Books. ISBN 1-85797-930-3, pp. 92–94.
  4. ^ a b "Rock group Led Zeppelin disbands". Spokesman-Review. (Spokane, Washington, U.S.). Associated Press. 6 December 1980. p. 24.
  5. ^ "The Long Shadow of Led Zeppelin". 10 August 2006.
  6. ^ John Bonham Biography Archived 16 March 2010 at the Wayback Machine
  7. ^ Anders, Marcel (October 2014). "Q&A: Robert Plant". Classic Rock #202. p. 30.
  8. ^ Chamberlain, Rich (October 2014). "Heavy Load: Myles Kennedy". Classic Rock #202. p. 138.
  9. ^ "Jimmy Page remastering Led Zeppelin albums for 2013 boxset release". NME. UK. 30 October 2012. Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  10. ^ "First Three Albums Newly Remastered With Previously Unreleased Companion Audio". Retrieved 14 March 2014.
  11. ^ "Led Zeppelin Reissues Continue with Deluxe Editions of Led Zeppelin IV and Houses of the Holy". Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  12. ^ "Physical Graffiti Deluxe Edition Arrives Exactly 40 Years After Debut, Produced and Newly Remastered by Jimmy Page, with Previously Unreleased Companion Audio". Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  13. ^ Grow, Kory (3 June 2015). "Led Zeppelin Announce Final Three Deluxe Reissues". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 3 June 2015.
  14. ^ "Pre-Order Deluxe Editions of Presence, In Through the Out Door, and Coda, Each Newly Remastered by Jimmy Page, With Previously Unreleased Companion Audio". Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  15. ^ "Led Zeppelin / Mothership 4LP vinyl". superdeluxeedition.com.
  16. ^ "The Complete BBC Sessions – With Previously Unreleased Recordings Out Sept. 16th". Retrieved 22 January 2017.
  17. ^ "Led Zeppelin Official Illustrated Book - Coming 2018". Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  18. ^ "Live Album How The West Was Won To Be Reissued With New Remastering Supervised By Jimmy Page". Retrieved 24 January 2018.
  19. ^ "Led Zeppelin share teaser trailer for beautiful Record Store Day release". NME. 3 January 2019.
  20. ^ "Aerosmith inducts Led Zeppelin 1995". Rockhall.com. Retrieved 10 May 2016.
  21. ^ "Jimmy Page and the Black Crowes Interview". Guitar.com. Archived from the original on 13 May 2016. Retrieved 10 May 2016.
  22. ^ "The Records That Changed My Life: Bernard Sumner of New Order". 4 July 2005. Retrieved 31 August 2017.
  23. ^ "Peter Hook : my top 10 favourite albums – Louder Than War". 26 October 2012. Retrieved 31 August 2017.
  24. ^ "Ke$ha: 'I have 200 songs for my second album". NME. UK. 5 June 2011. Retrieved 21 January 2017.
  25. ^ "Eminem scores seventh consecutive UK Number 1 album". Official Charts Company. 11 November 2013. Retrieved 30 September 2016.
  26. ^ "BBC – Radio 2 – Rock And Roll Band – The Best Band". BBC News. Retrieved 27 October 2014.

Bibliography[edit]

  • "Artist Chart History – Led Zeppelin". Billboard. 2009. Archived from the original on 21 February 2009. Retrieved 1 October 2011.
  • "Led Zeppelin Billboard Albums". AllMusic. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • "Led Zeppelin – Charting History". Official Charts Company. Archived from the original on 12 January 2013. Retrieved 12 January 2013.
  • "Zeppelin celebrate Grammy honour". BBC. 13 February 2005. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  • "Award for 'pioneers' Led Zeppelin". BBC. 23 May 2006. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  • "Led Zeppelin make UK Hall of Fame". BBC. 12 September 2006. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  • "Sold on song: Stairway to Heaven". BBC. 2011. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  • "Led Zeppelin trio back in studio". BBC. 26 August 2008. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 25 November 2008.
  • "Led Zeppelin at Bron-Yr-Aur". BBC. 2011. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  • Batchelor, Bob; Stoddart, Scott (2007). American Popular Culture Through History: the 1980s. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood. ISBN 978-0-313-33000-1.
  • Beech, Mark (29 September 2008). "Led Zeppelin Singer Robert Plant rules out reunion record, tour". Bloomberg. Archived from the original on 9 October 2011. Retrieved 29 September 2008.
  • Billboard (28 May 1977). "PRS/Novello Awards shared by intl artists". Billboard. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  • Bosso, Joe (7 January 2009). "'Led Zeppelin are over!', says Jimmy Page's manager". MusicRadar. Archived from the original on 8 October 2011. Retrieved 1 October 2011.
  • "Certified Awards Search—Led Zeppelin". British Phonographic Industry. 2011. Archived from the original on 26 August 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  • Brackett, John (2008). "Examining rhythmic and metric practices in Led Zeppelin's musical style". Popular Music. 27 (1): 53–76. doi:10.1017/s0261143008001487.
  • Brown, Pat (2001). The Guide to United States Popular Culture. Minneapolis: Popular Press. ISBN 978-0-87972-821-2.
  • Buckley, Peter (2003). The Rough Guide to Rock. London: Penguin Books. ISBN 978-1-85828-457-6.
  • Budofsky, Adam (2006). The Drummer: 100 Years of Rhythmic Power and Invention. Milwaukee: Hal Leonard. ISBN 978-1-4234-0567-2.
  • Bukszpan, Daniel (2003). The Encyclopedia of Heavy Metal. New York: Barnes & Noble. ISBN 978-0-7607-4218-1.
  • Christgau, Robert (15 June 1972). "A Power Plant". Newsday. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  • Christgau, Robert (December 1972). "Growing Up Grim With Mott the Hoople". Newsday. Retrieved 10 September 2018.
  • Christgau, Robert (31 March 1980). "Christgau's Consumer Guide". The Village Voice. Retrieved 6 September 2018.
  • "50 Best Live Acts of All Time". Classic Rock (118). May 2008.
  • Clinton, Heylin (2004). Bootleg! The Rise & Fall of the Secret Recording Industry. London: Omnibus Press. ISBN 978-1-84449-151-3.
  • Cochrane, Greg (23 January 2009). "Lady GaGa reveals her touring secrets". BBC. Retrieved 13 March 2011.
  • CNN (19 January 1999). "Interview Madonna reviews life on Larry King Live". CNN. Archived from the original on 21 January 2012. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • Cohen, Jonathan (27 July 2007). "Led Zeppelin readies fall reissue bonanza". Billboard. Retrieved 1 October 2011.
  • Cope, Andrew L. (2010). Black Sabbath and the Rise of Heavy Metal Music. Aldershot: Ashgate. ISBN 978-0-7546-6881-7.
  • Davies, Claire (29 September 2010). "Megadeth interview (Monster Riffs Week): Megadeth axeman Dave Mustaine walks Total Guitar through the fiery riff from 'Hangar 18'". Total Guitar. Archived from the original on 22 February 2012. Retrieved 22 February 2012.
  • Davis, Erik (2005). Led Zeppelin IV. New York: Continuum. ISBN 978-0-8264-1658-2.
  • Davis, Stephen (20 May 1976). "Album Review: Led Zeppelin: Presence". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 23 April 2009. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Davis, Stephen (1985). Hammer of the Gods: The Led Zeppelin Saga. London: Pan. ISBN 978-0-330-34287-2.
  • Dawtrey, Adam (26 October 2012). "'Zeppelin' film grosses mil in one night". Variety. Penske Business Media. Archived from the original on 13 January 2013. Retrieved 12 January 2013.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2007). "The Cult – Biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 15 January 2007.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2010). "Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin II: review". AllMusic. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011a). "Led Zeppelin: biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 8 September 2011.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011b). "Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin: review". AllMusic. Retrieved 16 September 2011.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011c). "Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin Box Set: review". AllMusic. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011e). "Led Zeppelin: Led Zeppelin Box Set 2: review". AllMusic. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  • Erlewine, Stephen Thomas (2011f). "Led Zeppelin: BBC Sessions: review". AllMusic. Retrieved 22 September 2011.
  • Fast, Susan (2001). In the Houses of the Holy: Led Zeppelin and the Power of Rock Music. New York: Oxford University Press. ISBN 978-0-19-514723-0.
  • Fast, Susan (2011). Led Zeppelin (British Rock Group). Encyclopædia Britannica. London. ISBN 978-0-19-514723-0.
  • The List (20 November 2007). "Jimmy Page says last Led Zeppelin reunion was a disaster". The List. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Fortnam, Ian (2008). Classic Rock Magazine: Dazed and Confused: Classic Rock Presents Led Zeppelin.
  • Fricke, David (26 November 2012). "Jimmy Page Digs Up 'Substantial' Rarities for New Led Zeppelin Remasters". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 27 November 2012.
  • Fyfe, Andy (2003). When the Levee Breaks: The Making of Led Zeppelin IV. Chicago: Chicago Review Press. ISBN 978-1-55652-508-7.
  • Gans, Alan (11 December 2007). "Dustin Hoffman, David Letterman, Natalia Makarova, Buddy Guy, Led Zeppelin Are Kennedy Center Honorees". Playbill. Archived from the original on 9 November 2012. Retrieved 12 September 2012.
  • Gardner, Alan (11 December 2007). "You review: Led Zeppelin". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  • Gaar, Gillian G. (2009). The Rough Guide to Nirvana. London: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 978-1-85828-945-8.
  • Garofalo, Reebee (2008). Rockin' Out: Popular Music in the USA (4th ed.). Pearson Prentice Hall. ISBN 978-0132343053.
  • Grammy (2011). "Grammy Hall of Fame". National Academy of Recording Arts and Sciences. Archived from the original on 18 December 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  • Gilmore, Mikal (10 August 2007). "The Long Shadow of Led Zeppelin". Rolling Stone (2006). Archived from the original on 12 December 2007. Retrieved 9 December 2007.
  • Greene, Andy (13 September 2012). "Led Zeppelin's 2007 reunion concert to hit theaters in October". Rolling Stone. Retrieved 29 September 2012.
  • Grossman, Perry (2002). "Alternative rock". St. James Encyclopedia of Pop Culture 2002. Gale Group. ISBN 1-55862-400-7. Archived from the original on 13 October 2010.
  • Grein, Paul (20 December 2012). "Chart watch extra: Led Zep's road to the Kennedy Center Honors". Yahoo Chart Watch. Retrieved 27 December 2012.
  • Gulla, Bob (2001). Guitar Gods: The 25 Players Who Made Rock History. Santa Barbara, California: ABC-CLIO. ISBN 978-0-313-35806-7.
  • Haskins, Django (1995). Stand Alone Tracks '90s Rock: Handy Guide, Book & CD. Los Angeles: Alfred Music. ISBN 978-0-88284-658-3.
  • Huey, Steve (2011). "The Honeydrippers: biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 19 September 2011.
  • Hughes, Rob (2010). "The real Jimmy Page". Uncut. Archived from the original on 18 December 2011. Retrieved 31 May 2010.
  • Hunter, Nigel (21 June 1997). "Anniversaries abound at the Novello Awards". Billboard. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  • Independent (7 December 2007). "Led Zeppelin: Katie Melua on rock'n'roll riffs that rake the psyche". The Independent. Retrieved 5 March 2010.
  • Jones, Robert (2 April 2003). "Conservative Punk's interview with Johnny Ramone". Retrieved 2 December 2010.
  • Kielty, Martin (28 November 2012). "Led Zep talks will delay remasters". Classic Rock. Archived from the original on 1 December 2012. Retrieved 30 November 2012.
  • Leonard, Michael (31 December 2008). "Robert Plant awarded CBE in UK Honours list". MusicRadar. Archived from the original on 18 December 2011. Retrieved 18 December 2011.
  • Lewis, Dave (1994). The Complete Guide to the Music of Led Zeppelin. London: Omnibus Press. ISBN 978-0-7119-3528-0.
  • Lewis, Dave (2003). Led Zeppelin: Celebration II: The 'Tight But Loose' Files. London: Omnibus Press. ISBN 978-1-84449-056-1.
  • Lewis, Dave; Pallett, Simon (1997). Led Zeppelin: The Concert File. London: Omnibus Press. ISBN 978-0-7119-5307-9.
  • Long, Carola (7 December 2007). "Led Zeppelin: the enduring influence of flares and flowing locks". The Independent. Retrieved 27 September 2011.
  • Márquez, Gabriel García (8 June 2002). "The poet and the princess". The Guardian. Retrieved 20 February 2012.
  • Miller, Jim (27 March 1975). "Album review: Physical Graffiti". Rolling Stone. Archived from the original on 23 April 2009. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Mojo (2008). "Mojo Awards 'Best Live Act' 2008 – Acceptance Speech". Archived from the original (video) on 13 October 2011.
  • MTV (9 March 2006). "MTV – Black Sabbath: the greatest metal bands of all time". MTV. Archived from the original on 19 March 2008. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • Murray, Charles Shaar (August 2004). "The Guv'nors". Mojo.
  • Newswire (3 June 1977). "Led Zeppelin official website: concert summary". LedZeppelin.com. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • Pareles, Jon (14 July 1997). "Lollapalooza's recycled hormones: rebellion by the numbers". The New York Times. Retrieved 4 December 2010.
  • Peddie, Ian (2006). "The bleak country: the Black Country and the rhetoric of escape". In Ian Peddie, ed (ed.). The Resisting Muse: Popular Music and Social Protest. Aldershot: Ashgate. ISBN 978-0-7546-5114-7.CS1 maint: Extra text: editors list (link)
  • Pond, Steven (24 March 1988). "Led Zeppelin: The Song Remains the Same". Rolling Stone. 522.
  • Prato, Greg (2008). "Jimmy Page: biography". AllMusic. Retrieved 11 November 2008.
  • Prown, Pete; Newquist, H. P.; Eiche, Jon F. (1997). Legends of Rock Guitar: The Essential Reference of Rock's Greatest Guitarists. Milwaukee: H.Leonard. ISBN 978-0-7935-4042-6.
  • "Led Zeppelin to sell music online". Reuters. 15 October 2007. Retrieved 23 September 2010.
  • RIAA (2009). "Gold & Platinum database search: 'Led Zeppelin'". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 26 March 2009.[permanent dead link]
  • RIAA (2011). "Top-Selling Artists". Recording Industry Association of America. Retrieved 8 January 2011.
  • Rock and Roll Hall of Fame (2010). "Led Zeppelin: biography". Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. Retrieved 5 September 2010.
  • "The RS 500 Greatest Albums of All Time". Rolling Stone. 18 November 2003. Archived from the original on 10 July 2008. Retrieved 4 June 2013.
  • Grohl, Dave (2011). "Led Zeppelin". In Brackett, Nathan (ed.). Rolling Stone: The 100 Greatest Artists of All Time. Rolling Stone.
  • Robertplant.com (29 September 2008). "Robert Plant – official statement". robertplant.com. Retrieved 29 September 2008.
  • Rolling Stone (10 August 2006). "Led Zeppelin: the heaviest band of all time". Rolling Stone. 1006. New York. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Rolling Stone (2009). "Led Zeppelin". Rolling Stone. New York. Retrieved 24 December 2009.
  • Rolling Stone (2011). "Greatest guitarists of all time: 9 – Jimmy Page". Rolling Stone. New York. Archived from the original on 4 August 2011. Retrieved 28 July 2011.[not in citation given]
  • Schinder, Scott; Schwartz, Andy (2008). Icons of Rock. Westport, Connecticut: Greenwood. ISBN 978-0-313-33846-5.
  • Shadwick, Keith (2005). Led Zeppelin: The Story of a Band and Their Music 1968–1980. San Francisco: Backbeat Books. ISBN 978-0-87930-871-1.
  • Sorel-Cameron, Peter (9 December 2007). "Can Led Zeppelin still rock?". CNN.com Entertainment. Retrieved 17 February 2011.
  • Sparks, Ryan (2010). "Carpe Diem: an exclusive interview with Mike Portnoy from Dream Theater". classicrockrevisited.com. Archived from the original on 3 January 2010. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Straw, Will (1990). "Characterizing rock music culture: the case of heavy metal". In Simon Frith and Andrew Goodwin, eds (ed.). On Record: Rock, Pop and the Written Word. London: Routledge. ISBN 978-0-415-05306-8.CS1 maint: Extra text: editors list (link)
  • Talmadge, Eric (28 January 2008). "Led Zeppelin guitarist wants World tour". The Huffington Post. Retrieved 25 November 2008.
  • Thompson, Dave (2004). Smoke on the Water: The Deep Purple Story. Toronto, Ontario: ECW Press. ISBN 978-1-55022-618-8.
  • Thorpe, Vanessa (29 July 2007). "Led Zeppelin join the net generation". The Observer. Retrieved 23 July 2011.
  • Turner, Gustavo (26 August 2010). "The L.A. weekly interview: Billy Corgan". LA Weekly.
  • TVNZ (17 December 2009). "Guinness 2010 entertainment winners". TVNZ. Retrieved 23 September 2009.
  • VH1 (2010). "Greatest artists of hard rock". VH1. Retrieved 17 February 2010.
  • Waksman, Steve (2001). Instruments of Desire: the Electric Guitar and the Shaping of Musical Experience. Cambridge, Massachusetts: Harvard University Press. ISBN 978-0-674-00547-1.
  • Waksman, Steve (2009). This Ain't the Summer of Love: Conflict and Crossover in Heavy Metal and Punk. Berkeley, California: University of California Press. ISBN 978-0-520-25310-0.
  • Wale, Michael (11 July 1973). "Led Zeppelin". The Times.
  • Wall, Mick (1 November 2008). "The truth behind the Led Zeppelin legend". The Times. Retrieved 29 July 2011.
  • Wall, Mick (2008). When Giants Walked the Earth: A Biography of Led Zeppelin. London: Orion. ISBN 978-1-4091-0319-6.
  • Walser, Robert (1993). Running with the Devil: Power, Gender, and Madness in Heavy Metal Music. New York: Wesleyan University Press. ISBN 978-0-8195-6260-9.
  • Welch, Chris (1994). Led Zeppelin. London: Orion. ISBN 978-1-85797-930-5.
  • Welch, Chris; Nicholls, Geoff (2001). John Bonham: A Thunder of Drums. San Francisco: Backbeat. ISBN 978-0-87930-658-8.
  • Williamson, Nigel (May 2005). "Forget the myths". Uncut.
  • Williamson, Nigel (2007). The Rough Guide to Led Zeppelin. London: Dorling Kindersley. ISBN 978-1-84353-841-7.
  • Witmer, Scott (2010). History of Rock Bands. Edina, Minnesota: ABDO. ISBN 978-1-60453-692-8.
  • Yorke, Ritchie (1993). Led Zeppelin: The Definitive Biography. Novato, California: Underwood–Miller. ISBN 978-0-88733-177-0.

Further reading[edit]

External links[edit]


From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

Jump to navigation Jump to search
Contents:
Ancient music – Early history – 1500s – 1510s – 1520s – 1530s – 1540s – 1550s – 1560s – 1570s – 1580s – 1590s – 1600s – 1610s – 1620s – 1630s – 1640s – 1650s – 1660s – 1670s – 1680s – 1690s – 1700s – 1710s – 1720s – 1730s – 1740s – 1750s – 1760s – 1770s – 1780s – 1790s – 1800s – 1810s – 1820s – 1830s – 1840s – 1850s – 1860s – 1870s – 1880s – 1890s – 1900s – 1910s – 1920s – 1930s – 1940s – 1950s – 1960s – 1970s – 1980s – 1990s – 2000s – 2010s

This page indexes the individual year in music pages.

Main article: 2010s in music

  • 2019 in music, 2019 in American music
  • 2018 in music, 2018 in American music, 2018 in British music, 2018 in Canadian music, 2018 in Danish music, 2018 in Finnish music, 2018 in Icelandic music, 2018 in Japanese music, 2018 in Norwegian music, 2018 in Philippine music, 2018 in Scandinavian music, 2018 in South Korean music, 2018 in Swedish music
    • Deaths of Hugh Masekela, Tom Rapp, Vic Damone, Fredo Santana, Craig Mack, Avicii, XXXTentacion, Jimmy Wopo, Joe Jackson, Aretha Franklin, Mac Miller, Dolores O'Riordan, Lil Peep
    • Notable releases
  • 2017 in music, 2017 in American music, 2017 in British music, 2017 in Canadian music, 2017 in Danish music, 2017 in Finnish music, 2017 in Icelandic music, 2017 in Japanese music, 2017 in Norwegian music, 2017 in Philippine music, 2017 in Scandinavian music, 2017 in South Korean music, 2017 in Swedish music
    • Deaths of Tom Petty, Chester Bennington, Al Jarreau, Fats Domino, Allan Holdsworth, Chuck Berry, J. Geils, John Wetton, Larry Coryell, Svend Asmussen, Chris Cornell, Gregg Allman, Butch Trucks, Rosalie Sorrels, Prodigy, Glen Campbell, Walter Becker, Grant Hart, Walter "Junie" Morrison, Jaki Liebezeit, Holger Czukay, David Cassidy, Johnny Hallyday, Keely Smith, Malcolm Young and Pierre Henry
    • The One Love Manchester event takes place, after the devastating Manchester Arena bomb attacks.
    • Notable releases:
    • Luis Fonsi and Daddy Yankee, remixing with Justin Bieber release the record breaking hit single Despacito.
  • 2016 in music, 2016 in American music, 2016 in Asian music, 2016 in Brazilian music,2016 in British music, 2016 in Canadian music, 2016 in Chinese music, 2016 in Danish music, 2016 in European music (Continental Europe), 2016 in Finnish music, 2016 in French music, 2016 in German music, 2016 in Icelandic music, 2016 in Indian music, 2016 in Irish music, 2016 in Japanese music, 2016 in Malaysian music, 2016 in Norwegian music, 2016 in Philippine music, 2016 in Scandinavian music, 2016 in South Korean music, 2016 in Swedish music, 2016 in Vietnamese music
    • Deaths of Juan Gabriel, Paul Bley, Pierre Boulez, Elizabeth Swados, David Bowie, Paul Kantner, Glenn Frey, Leif Solberg, Harald Devold, George Martin, Naná Vasconcelos, Keith Emerson, Merle Haggard, Christina Grimmie, Glenn Yarbrough, Dan Hicks, Maurice White, Pete Burns, John Berry, Vanity, Prince, Oscar Brand, Mose Allison, Nick Menza, the members of Viola Beach, Fred Hellerman, Leonard Cohen, Leon Russell, Sharon Jones, Phife Dawg, Greg Lake and George Michael
    • Notable releases:
  • 2015 in music, 2015 in American music, 2015 in Australian music, 2015 in British music, 2015 in Canadian music, 2015 in Danish music, 2015 in European music (Continental Europe), 2015 in Finnish music, 2015 in Icelandic music, 2015 in Indian music, 2015 in Irish music, 2015 in Japanese music, 2015 in Philippine music, 2015 in South Korean music, 2015 in Norwegian music, 2015 in Swedish music
    • Deaths of Lemmy, Clark Terry, Erik Amundsen, Rod McKuen, John Eaton, Lesley Gore, Percy Sledge, Ben E. King, B.B. King, Jean Ritchie, Ronnie Gilbert, Ornette Coleman, Theodore Bikel, Bob Johnston, Kurt Masur, Nora Brockstedt, Scott Weiland, Svein Christiansen, Gary Richrath, Dallas Taylor, Kim Fowley, and Natalie Cole.
    • Notable releases:
    • Jerry Lee Lewis embarks on a final tour of the UK.
  • 2014 in music, 2014 in American music, 2014 in Australian music, 2014 in Brazilian music, 2014 in British music, 2014 in Canadian music, 2014 in European music (Continental Europe), 2014 in Irish music, 2014 in Japanese music, 2014 in Norwegian music, 2014 in Philippine music, 2014 in South Korean music, 2014 in Swedish music
    • Death of Phil Everly, Pete Seeger, Casey Kasem, Bobby Womack, Tommy Ramone, Johnny Winter, Paco De Lucia, Jack Bruce, Bobby Keys, Joe Cocker
    • Ringo Starr and Paul McCartney perform together on 50th anniversary celebration to the Beatles, with performances by various artists.
    • Notable releases:
    • Mark Robson teams up with Bruno Mars to record the number one hit single Uptown Funk
  • 2013 in music, 2013 in American music, 2013 in Australian music, 2013 in British music, 2013 in Canadian music, 2013 in European music (Continental Europe), 2013 in Irish music, 2013 in Japanese music, 2013 in Norwegian music, 2013 in South Korean music, 2013 in Swedish music
    • Death of Patti Page, Cecil Womack, Lil Snupe, Alvin Lee, Clive Burr, Jeff Hanneman, Lou Reed, and Ray Manzarek.
    • Notable release:
    • Film star Anna Kendrick releases Cups (When I'm Gone) (featured on the soundtrack to the film Pitch Perfect)
  • 2012 in music, 2012 in American music, 2012 in Asian music, 2012 in Australian music, 2012 in British music, 2012 in Canadian music, 2012 in European music (Continental Europe), 2012 in Norwegian music, 2012 in Irish music, 2012 in Japanese music, 2012 in Swedish music, 2012 in South Korean music
    • Death of Ian Bargh, Whitney Houston, Etta James, Ravi Shankar, Davy Jones, Robert B. Sherman, Earl Scruggs, Levon Helm, Adam Yauch, Donna Summer, Robin Gibb, Doc Watson, Bob Welch, Kitty Wells, Jon Lord, Andy Williams, Jenni Rivera, Mitch Lucker, Dave Brubeck and Richard Rodney Bennett.
    • The Beach Boys embark on a 2012 world tour celebrating their 50th Anniversary.
    • Swedish House Mafia announce their break up and embark on One Last Tour.
    • English singer-songwriter Jake Bugg releases his debut album, Jake Bugg.
    • Madonna's 12th studio album is released, entitled MDNA. It tops the charts across the globe including the United Kingdom where she becomes the solo artist with the most number one albums and the UK breaks the iTunes pre-order record.[3] To support the album she embarks on The MDNA Tour which grosses over 5 million and becomes the second highest grossing female tour, behind her own Sticky and Sweet Tour.
    • South Korean pop singer Psy releases his album Psy 6 (Six Rules), Part 1.
    • Nicki Minaj releases her album Pink Friday: Roman Reloaded
    • Kesha releases Warrior
    • Taylor Swift releases Red
    • Kendrick Lamar releases good kid, m.A.A.d city
    • Frank Ocean releases Channel Orange
  • 2011 in music, 2011 in American music, 2011 in British music, 2011 in Canadian music, 2011 in European music (Continental Europe), 2011 in Irish music, 2011 in Japanese music, 2011 in Norwegian music, 2011 in Swedish music
    • Death of Gerry Rafferty, Gary Moore, George Shearing, Mike Starr, Ferlin Husky, Gil Scott-Heron, Clarence Clemons, Amy Winehouse, Sylvia Robinson, Bert Jansch, and Dobie Gray.
    • English singer Adele released the album 21, which had sold 26.4 million copies worldwide according to the International Federation of the Phonographic Industry, became the best selling album in the past 15 years, and also won six Grammys.
    • Lady Gaga releases her iconic album Born This Way
    • Jessie J releases her debut studio album, Who You Are
    • LMFAO release the album Sorry for Party Rocking
    • Gotye releases the album Making Mirrors, which features the number one hit single Somebody That I Used to Know
  • 2010 in music, 2010 in American music, 2010 in Australian music, 2010 in British music, 2010 in European music (Continental Europe), 2010 in Irish music, 2010 in Japanese music, 2010 in Norwegian music, 2010 in Swedish music
    • Tour of Jerry Lee Lewis.
    • Metallica, Megadeth, Slayer and Anthrax perform together for the first time as part of the Big 4 shows.
    • Death of Teddy Pendergrass, Ed Thigpen, Kate McGarrigle, Ronnie James Dio, Peter Steele, Paul Gray, Lena Horne, Jimmy Dean, Tuli Kupferberg, Eddie Fisher, Joan Sutherland and Bobby Farrell.
    • Notable releases:

Main article: 2000s in music

Live 8 concerts took place in 9 countries worldwide during 2005.
  • 2009 in music, 2009 in British music, 2009 in Canadian music, 2009 in Irish music, 2009 in Japanese music, 2009 in Norwegian music, 2009 in South Korean music
    • Deaths of Michael Jackson, James Owen Sullivan, Leon Kirchner, Les Paul, Ali Akbar Khan, Merce Cunningham, Ron Asheton, Henri Pousseur, Mary Travers, Stephen Gately, and Alain Bashung.
    • Lady Gaga releases The Fame Monster
    • Flo Rida releases his studio album R.O.O.T.S.. His lead single "Right Round" introduces future pop star Kesha to a mainstream audience.
    • Noel Gallagher departs from Oasis after 18 years.
    • Phoenix release Lisztomania
    • Michael Bublé's Crazy Love
    • The Black Eyed Peas's The E.N.D
  • Debut of:
  • 2008 in music, 2008 in British music, 2008 in Canadian music, 2008 in Irish music, 2008 in Japanese music, 2008 in Norwegian music, 2008 in South Korean music
    • Deaths of Mauricio Kagel, Artie Traum, Wilfrid Mellers, LeRoi Moore, Erik Darling, Isaac Hayes, Bo Diddley, Richard Wright, Nick Reynolds, Mitch Mitchell, Miriam Makeba, Odetta, Eartha Kitt, Freddie Hubbard, and Robert Hazard.
    • Mariah Carey's "Touch My Body" becomes her 18th U.S. chart-topper, setting the record for most U.S. number ones singles by a solo artist – only behind The Beatles with 20 – and most weeks at number one on the Hot 100 chart with a total of 79.
    • Lil Wayne released Tha Carter III and sold 1 million copies in the first week, becoming the best selling album of 2008.
    • Madonna's Sticky and Sweet Tour becomes the highest grossing female tour of all-time (surpassing her own record) and then the highest grossing solo tour of all time. It promotes her 11th studio album Hard Candy which sells 4 million copies and includes the international hit song "4 Minutes".
    • Kanye West's 808s & Heartbreak
    • Lady Gaga's first studio album, The Fame
    • Katy Perry releases her first studio album, One of the Boys
    • Taylor Swift's second studio album, Fearless releases.
  • 2007 in music, 2007 in British music, 2007 in Canadian music, 2007 in Irish music, 2007 in Japanese music, 2007 in Norwegian music, 2007 in South Korean music
    • Deaths of Beverly Sills, Max Roach, Oscar Peterson, Izumi Sakai, Luciano Pavarotti, Karlheinz Stockhausen, and Don Arden.
    • Live Earth and Led Zeppelin reunion.
    • Radiohead splits from EMI and independently releases In Rainbows with an online download method of payment that allows the buyer to choose their price.
    • The Mars Volta releases one of the first USB flash drive albums, as part of their The Bedlam in Goliath.
    • Kanye West releases Graduation
    • Amy Winehouse releases Back to Black
  • 2006 in music, 2006 in British music, 2006 in Irish music, 2006 in Norwegian music, 2006 in South Korean music, 2006 in Swiss music
  • 2005 in music, 2005 in British music, 2005 in Irish music, 2005 in Norwegian music, 2005 in South Korean music, 2005 in Swiss music
    • Gorillaz release the hit album, Demon Days.
    • Mariah Carey releases her 10-million selling The Emancipation of Mimi, the best-selling album of the year worldwide, alongside the album's second single "We Belong Together", the year's most successful single, and the Song of the Decade 2000–2009.
    • Death of Luther Vandross and John Herald.
    • Pink Floyd reunion for Live 8.
    • Madonna releases Confessions on a Dance Floor, her 10th studio album. It wins a Grammy award, Brit award, sells in excess of 12 million copies and has the worldwide hit "Hung Up" which tops the charts in a record-breaking 41 countries.[4]
    • Kanye West releases his album Late Registration
    • Debuts by:
  • 2004 in music, 2004 in British music, 2004 in Irish music, 2004 in Norwegian music, 2004 in South Korean music
    • Death of Ray Charles and Dimebag Darrell.
    • Danger Mouse releases The Grey Album, sparking days of electronic disobedience by Internet file sharers against EMI.
    • Green Day releases American Idiot to critical acclaim.
    • Canadian singer Celine Dion became recipient of the Diamond award, and she was honored in 2004 by World Music Awards receiving the best selling female artist of all time.
    • Debut by:
    • Notable releases:
      • Norwegian pop band O-Zone release Dragostea Din Tei, going on to become an Internet sensation.
  • 2003 in music, 2003 in British music, 2003 in Irish music, 2003 in Norwegian music, 2003 in South Korean music
  • 2002 in music, 2002 in British music, 2002 in Norwegian music, 2002 in South Korean music
  • 2001 in music, 2001 in British music, 2001 in Norwegian music, 2001 in South Korean music
    • Deaths of Mimi Fariña, Chet Atkins, Aaliyah, George Harrison, John Lee Hooker, John Phillips, Perry Como, Isaac Stern, and Chuck Schuldiner
    • Duran Duran is reunited with the original five members and goes on tour for the first time since 1985.
    • Michael Jackson's last studio album Invincible released.
    • Gorillaz' self-titled debut album Gorillaz is released.
    • Kylie Minogue releases Fever
    • Napster's popularity peaks.
    • Metallica and Dr. Dre sue Napster over illegal distribution of their music.
    • Debuts by:
  • 2000 in music, 2000 in British music, 2000 in Norwegian music, 2000 in South Korean music
    • Mariah Carey becomes the Best-Selling Artist of the Millennium according to the World Music Awards.
    • Britney Spears' Oops!... I Did It Again sells over 23 million copies and becomes the best-selling album by a female artist of the decade.
    • Blink-182 enjoy mainstream success (mainly from their hit single "All the Small Things") and lead pop-punk into the 21st Century.
    • Madonna releases her album Music, which goes on to sell 15 million copies, becomes universally acclaimed, and gets nominated for 5 Grammy awards. It follows her 1998 comeback Ray of Light.
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases

List of 10 best-selling albums of the 2000s[edit]

  1. The Beatles – 1 – 31 million[5] – 2000
  2. Norah Jones – Come Away with Me – 26 million[6] – 2002
  3. Backstreet Boys – Black & Blue – 24 million[7] – 2000
  4. Linkin Park – Hybrid Theory – 24 million[9] – 2000
  5. Britney Spears – Oops!... I Did It Again – 20 million[10] – 2000
  6. Usher – Confessions – 20 million[11] – 2004
  7. Eminem – The Eminem Show – 19 million[12] – 2002
  8. Eminem – The Marshall Mathers LP – 19 million[12][13] – 2000
  9. Avril Lavigne – Let Go – 17 million[14] – 2002
  10. Evanescence – Fallen – 17 million[15] – 2003

Main article: 1990s in music

  • 1999 in music, 1999 in British music, 1999 in Norwegian music, 1999 in South Korean music
    • Arrival of Britney Spears, Coldplay, Jenni Rivera, Christina Aguilera, Jessica Simpson, Slipknot, Muse and Jennifer Lopez.
    • Deaths of Rick Danko, Scatman John and Curtis Mayfield.
    • Notable releases:
    • Ricky Martin releases the massively popular hit song Livin' la Vida Loca
  • 1998 in music, 1998 in British music, 1998 in Norwegian music, 1998 in South Korean music
  • 1997 in music, 1997 in British music, 1997 in Norwegian music
  • 1996 in music, 1996 in British music, 1996 in Norwegian music
    • Death of Ella Fitzgerald, Tupac Shakur, and Brad Nowell.
    • Arrival of Lynda Thomas, Spice Girls.
    • Guns N' Roses break up, later reuniting for 2008's Chinese Democracy.
    • Pink Floyd disband.
    • Celine Dion released the album Falling into You, selling over 32 million copies worldwide.
    • Andrea Bocelli releases the acclaimed song "Con te partirò".
    • Max Cavalera leaves Sepultura, later going on to form Soulfly.
    • Notable releases:
    • Debut album:
  • 1995 in music, 1995 in British music, 1995 in Norwegian music
    • Michael Jackson releases HIStory: Past, Present and Future, Book I, the best-selling multi-disc album of all time.[16][17] This double album contains "You Are Not Alone" – the first single ever to enter the Billboard Hot 100 at number one.[18]
    • Death of Jerry Garcia, Dean Martin, Phyllis Hyman, Selena, Burl Ives, and Eazy-E.
    • Mariah Carey becomes the first female artist in history to have a song debut at number one with Fantasy.
    • Coolio and L.V. release the award-winning single "Gangsta's Paradise" from the film Dangerous Minds
    • Mariah Carey and band Boyz II Men releases the multiple-record holding "One Sweet Day", the single with the most weeks at number and the Song of the Decade 1990–1999.
    • Italian DJ Robert Miles releases his debut single Children to universal acclaim.
    • Los del Río release Macarena, the record breaking dance song of all time.
    • Queen releases their final album Made in Heaven following the death of frontman Freddie Mercury.
    • Notable releases:
  • 1994 in music, 1994 in British music, 1994 in Norwegian music
    • Deaths of:
    • Debuts by:
    • Other albums released:
      • Pink Floyd's The Division Bell, their last album until 2014's The Endless River.
      • Madonna's Bedtime Stories
      • Blur's Parklife
      • Green Day's major-label debut, Dookie, with the hits "Longview", "Welcome to Paradise", "Basket Case", "When I Come Around" and "She".
      • The Offspring's Smash
      • Common's Resurrection
      • Soundgarden's Superunknown
      • R.E.M.'s Monster
      • NOFX's Punk in Drublic
      • Nine Inch Nails' The Downward Spiral
      • Bad Religion's Stranger Than Fiction. With this album, the band earned their first (and only) US gold record in its 15-year career.
      • Mariah Carey's Merry Christmas, with its multi-platinum lead single "All I Want for Christmas Is You", which eventually becomes the nineteenth best-selling digital single of the 20th century.
      • Beck's major-label debut, Mellow Gold.
  • 1993 in music, 1993 in British music, 1993 in Norwegian music
  • 1992 in music, 1992 in British music, 1992 in Norwegian music
    • Debut albums by Body Count (Body Count), Dr. Dre (The Chronic), Pavement (Slanted and Enchanted), Rage Against the Machine (Rage Against the Machine), Stone Temple Pilots (Core), Sublime (40oz. to Freedom), Therapy? (Nurse), Ugly Kid Joe (America's Least Wanted) and Tori Amos (Little Earthquakes) are released.
    • Death of John Cage and Yutaka Ozaki.
    • U2 start the Zoo TV Tour
    • Freddie Mercury Tribute Concert
    • Birth of Selena Gomez
    • Other releases:
      • R.E.M.'s Automatic for the People
      • Madonna's sexually-provocative book Sex, which was accompanied by the double-platinum album Erotica. It becomes one of the most controversial books and albums ever released, but enjoys commercial success. From it, Madonna made 0 million for her label.[19]
      • The soundtrack to the film The Bodyguard, the best selling soundtrack album of all time, selling over 45 million copies worldwide to date. Its leading single "I Will Always Love You" became the best selling single by a female artist (Whitney Houston) of all time, selling over 15 million copies.
      • Faith No More's Angel Dust
      • Obituary's The End Complete
  • 1991 in music, 1991 in British music, 1996 in Norwegian music
  • 1990 in music, 1990 in British music, 1990 in Norwegian music
    • Debut albums by Alice in Chains (Facelift), Cannibal Corpse (Eaten Back to Life), Mariah Carey (Mariah Carey), Deee-Lite (World Clique), Green Day (39/Smooth), Helmet (Strap It On), Ice Cube (AmeriKKKa's Most Wanted), Primus (Frizzle Fry), Ride (Nowhere) and A Tribe Called Quest (People's Instinctive Travels and the Paths of Rhythm) are released.
    • Death of Sarah Vaughan, Leonard Bernstein, Luigi Nono, Johnnie Ray, and Sammy Davis, Jr..
    • Milli Vanilli becomes exposed as a music fraud.
    • The Three Tenors; Plácido Domingo, José Carreras and Luciano Pavarotti give their first concert, at the Baths of Caracalla in Rome, with recording of the concert turned into Carreras Domingo Pavarotti in Concert, becoming the fastest-selling classical album of all time.
    • Notable releases:

List of 10 best-selling albums of the 1990s[edit]

  1. Whitney Houston / Various artists – The Bodyguard – 45 million[20][21] – 1992
  2. Shania Twain – Come on Over – 40 million[22] – 1997
  3. Alanis Morissette – Jagged Little Pill – 33 million[23] – 1995
  4. Mariah Carey – Music Box – 32 million[24] – 1993
  5. Celine Dion – Falling into You – 32 million[25] – 1996
  6. Michael Jackson – Dangerous – 32 million[26][27] – 1991
  7. Celine Dion – Let's Talk About Love – 31 million[28] – 1997
  8. Madonna – The Immaculate Collection – 30 million[29][30] – 1990
  9. Britney Spears – ...Baby One More Time – 30 million[31][32] – 1999
  10. Backstreet Boys – Millennium – 30 million[33][34] – 1999

Main article: 1980s in music

  • 1989 in music, 1989 in British music, 1989 in Norwegian music
    • Debut albums are released by:
    • Other notable releases:
    • Ice Cube departs from N.W.A after financial problems and several conflicts with their manager Jerry Heller and the group's founder Eazy-E, and begins a solo career.
  • 1988 in music, 1988 in British music, 1988 in Norwegian music
  • 1987 in music, 1987 in British music, 1987 in Norwegian music
  • Notable releases:
  • The Beastie Boys' debut Licensed to Ill, released the year before, becomes the first hip hop record to reach number one on the Billboard 200.
  • Death of legendary record producer John H. Hammond.
  • Debuts by:
  • 1986 in music, 1986 in British music, 1986 in Norwegian music
    • Aerosmith re-records "Walk This Way" with rap group Run-D.M.C. which blends rock and rap music, introduces rap music to a mainstream audience for the first time, and marks the beginning of the resurrection of Aerosmith's career, one of rock's most remarkable comebacks
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases:
    • Deaths of:
  • 1985 in music, 1985 in British music, 1985 in Norwegian music
    • Death of Ricky Nelson
    • Live Aid and Farm Aid benefit concerts take place.
    • Duran Duran records "A View to a Kill" to the James Bond movie of the same name. This single remains the only Bond theme to go to Number 1 on the US charts, and the highest-placed Bond theme on the UK chart where it reached Number 2.
    • The famous hard rock band Guns N' Roses was formed in Los Angeles.
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases:
  • 1984 in music, 1984 in British music, 1984 in Norwegian music
    • Deaths of:
    • Akhnaten by Philip Glass premieres in Stuttgart
    • Notable releases:
    • Debuts by:
    • Duran Duran was the first group ever to utilize a monitor in concert to project their performance.
    • R. Murray Schafer's Concerto for flute and orchestra peroformed featuring Robert Aitken on flute.
    • Band Aid, a group of familiar music names, is formed to perform Do They Know It's Christmas?
    • Michael Jackson's album Thriller wins a record-breaking 8 Grammy Awards at the 1984 Grammys.
  • 1983 in music, 1983 in British music, 1983 in Norwegian music
  • 1982 in music, 1982 in British music, 1982 in Norwegian music
    • The compact disc is introduced.
    • Blondie disband.
    • Ronnie James Dio leaves Black Sabbath and forms Dio.
    • Metallica makes its debut on record, appearing on the first Metal Massacre compilation album. "Hit the Lights", the track recorded for this compilation album, would be re-recorded a year later for their debut album Kill 'Em All.
    • Deaths of:
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases:
    • Survivor release their top hit "Eye of the Tiger" from the soundtrack to the film Rocky III
  • 1981 in music, 1981 in British music, 1981 in Norwegian music
    • MTV first airs
    • Death of Bob Marley
    • Bands formed:
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases:
  • 1980 in music, 1980 in British music, 1980 in Norwegian music
    • Deaths of:
    • Debuts by:
    • Notable releases:

Main article: 1970s in music

  • 1979 in music, 1979 in British music, 1979 in Norwegian music
  • 1978 in music, 1978 in British music, 1978 in Norwegian music
  • 1977 in music, 1977 in British music, 1977 in Norwegian music – Sex Pistols release Never Mind the Bollocks, Here's the Sex Pistols; Death of Elvis Presley, Bing Crosby, Marc Bolan; Fleetwood Mac releases Rumours; Queen – News of the World; Bee Gees – Saturday Night Fever; Lynyrd Skynyrd Convair 240 plane crash; Steve Hackett leaves Genesis; Birth of Gerard Way from My Chemical Romance, Birth of Mike Shinoda of Linkin Park and Fort Minor
  • 1976 in music, 1976 in British music, 1976 in Norwegian music – Births of:
    • Deaths of:
    • Notable releases:
    • Debuts by:
    • The Band performs their final concert, The Last Waltz
  • 1975 in music, 1975 in British music, 1975 in Norwegian music – Death of Dmitri Shostakovich, Tim Buckley, Umm Kulthum; Bob Dylan begins Rolling Thunder Revue; Bruce Springsteen – Born to Run; Bob Dylan – Blood on the Tracks; Led Zeppelin – Physical Graffiti; Aerosmith – Toys in the Attic; Patti Smith – Horses; Release of Donna Summer's Love to Love You Baby; Peter Gabriel leaves Genesis; Queen releases A Night at the Opera; Birth of Melanie Brown
  • 1974 in music – Death of Duke Ellington, Nick Drake; Birth of Melanie Chisholm and Victoria Beckham; Release of Genesis's The Lamb Lies Down on Broadway; ABBA win the 1974 Eurovision Song Contest with Waterloo, Olivia Newton-John places fourth with Long Live Love.
  • 1973 in music – Pink Floyd – The Dark Side of the Moon, Death of Bobby Darin, Gram Parsons; Birth of Ferry Corsten; The Who's Quadrophenia Released; Buffalo, Volcanic Rock, Diana Ross released Touch Me in the Morning, David Bowie releases Aladdin Sane, Maureen McGovern releases The Morning After, Roberta Flack releases Killing Me Softly With His Song, Marie Osmond releases Paper Roses
  • 1972 in music, 1972 in British music, 1972 in Norwegian music
  • 1971 in music, 1971 in British music, 1971 in Norwegian music – Birth of Tupac Shakur, Snoop Dogg; Death of Igor Stravinsky, Duane Allman, Louis Armstrong, Jim Morrison, Carl Ruggles; Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin IV, Marvin Gaye – What's Going On, The Who – Who's Next, Joni Mitchell – Blue; Birth of the band Queen
  • 1970 in music, 1970 in British music, 1970 in Norwegian music – Birth of Mariah Carey. The Beatles disband; Death of Jimi Hendrix, Death of Janis Joplin; John Lennon releases John Lennon/Plastic Ono Band, Diana Ross departs from The Supremes and releases Ain't No Mountain High Enough, Black Sabbath releases debut album, George Harrison releases All Things Must Pass

Main article: 1960s in music

  • 1969 in music, 1969 in British music, 1969 in Norwegian music – Death of Brian Jones and Judy Garland; Woodstock music festival held in Bethel, New York; Birth of Dave Grohl, Marilyn Manson, Jennifer Lopez, Jenni Rivera and Tiësto; The Beatles – Abbey Road, Bob Dylan – Nashville Skyline, The Archies – Sugar Sugar, The Who's Tommy released, Jackson 5 appearance on Ed Sullivan, King Crimson – In the Court of the Crimson King
  • 1968 in music, 1968 in British music, 1968 in Norwegian music – Birth of Toni Braxton; – Van Morrison – Astral Weeks, Sammy Davis Jr. – I've Gotta Be Me, The Rolling Stones – Beggars Banquet, The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Electric Ladyland, Led Zeppelin – Led Zeppelin, The Beatles – The Beatles (AKA The White Album), Johnny Cash – At Folsom Prison, The Band – Music from Big Pink; Birth of John Ondrasik (Five for Fighting) and Thom Yorke Anne Murray releases What About Me
  • 1967 in music, 1967 in British music, 1967 in Norwegian music – Birth of Kurt Cobain, Chuck Schuldiner; Death of Woody Guthrie, John Coltrane, Otis Redding; The Beatles – Sgt. Pepper's Lonely Hearts Club Band and Magical Mystery Tour, The Velvet Underground – The Velvet Underground & Nico, The Jimi Hendrix Experience – Are You Experienced and Axis: Bold as Love, Pink Floyd – The Piper at the Gates of Dawn, Aretha Franklin – Respect, The Doors – The Doors (with the hit single, "Light My Fire"), Louis Armstrong – What a Wonderful World, Bob Dylan – John Wesley Harding, The 13th Floor Elevators – Easter Everywhere; Monterey Pop Festival
  • 1966 in music, 1966 in British music, 1966 in Norwegian music – The Beach Boys – Pet Sounds, Cream – Fresh Cream, The Beatles – Revolver, Bob Dylan – Blonde on Blonde, The 13th Floor Elevators – The Psychedelic Sounds of the 13th Floor Elevators; Birth of Rick Astley
  • 1965 in music, 1965 in British music, 1965 in Norwegian music – The Beatles – Help!, The Beatles – Rubber Soul, Bob Dylan – Bringing It All Back Home and Highway 61 Revisited (with the single "Like a Rolling Stone"), The Rolling Stones – Out of Our Heads (with the single "(I Can't Get No) Satisfaction"), Tom Jones - "What's New Pussycat?" (from the film of the same name), James Brown – "I Got You (I Feel Good)", Herman's Hermits debut; Death of Edgard Varèse, Nat King Cole.
  • 1964 in music, 1964 in British music, 1964 in Norwegian music – Birth of Robert Trujillo – Death of Sam Cooke, Milton Babbitt, Ensembles For Synthesizer; The Beatles appear on The Ed Sullivan Show; The Beatles – A Hard Day's Night, Bill Lear invents 8-track tape cartridge; Bob Dylan – The Times They Are a-Changin', British Invasion begins, Beatlemania invades America and becomes international, The Righteous Brothers become the first white act signed to Phil Spector's Philles label. The Beach Boys – I Get Around released and hits No. 1.
  • 1963 in music, 1963 in British music, 1963 in Norwegian music – First cassette tapes made by Philips, The Beatles – Please Please Me, Birth of Paul Oakenfold, Birth of Whitney Houston, George Michael, Birth of Eazy-E, Birth of James Hetfield; Death of Patsy Cline, Édith Piaf; Bob Dylan – The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan, The Righteous Brothers "Little Latin Lupe Lu" is released on the Moonglow label; Stevie Wonder releases his first big hit 'finger-tips – part 2' aged only 13, arguably making Motown music commercially popular for the first time even though its birth was in 1959; Elvis Presley records Today, Tomorrow and Forever with Ann-Margret, which uses the melody of Franz Liszt's Liebesträume.
  • 1962 in music, 1962 in British music, 1962 in Norwegian music – "Love Me Do" released as a single by The Beatles; Bob Dylan is the debut album from the highly influential American artist of the same name. It was released on March 19, 1962 on Columbia Records, when Dylan was 20 years old. Birth of Anthony Kiedis, Flea, Jon Bon Jovi, Axl Rose; Death of Marilyn Monroe
  • 1961 in music, 1961 in British music, 1961 in Norwegian music – Birth of Dave Mustaine, Tom Araya; Death of Cisco Houston, Moss Hart
  • 1960 in music, 1960 in British music, 1960 in Norwegian music – Birth of Bono; Death of Oscar Hammerstein II

Main article: 1950s in music

  • 1959 in music, 1959 in British music, 1959 in Norwegian music
    • Births of Sheena Easton, Irene Cara, "Weird Al" Yankovic, Pete Burns (from Dead or Alive), and Marie Osmond.
    • Deaths of Billie Holiday, Ritchie Valens, Buddy Holly, the Big Bopper, and Heitor Villa-Lobos.
    • Motown Records is founded, with their first hit being Barrett Strong's "Money (That's What I Want)".
    • Notable releases:
  • 1958 in music, 1958 in British music, 1958 in Norwegian music – Death of Ralph Vaughan Williams; Cannonball Adderley records Somethin' Else; Art Blakey and the Jazz Messengers, Moanin'; Alvin and the Chipmunks release The Chipmunk Song (Christmas Don't Be Late), Bruce Dickinson, Nikki Sixx, Prince, Madonna and Michael Jackson are born. Born Bossa Nova a Brazilian kind of music. Carl Ruggles, Exaltation in honour of his late wife, Charlotte. Cliff Richard and The Drifters release Move It, considered Britain's first rock and roll hit single. Little Richard enters seminary.
  • 1957 in music, 1957 in British music, 1957 in Norwegian music – Death of Jean Sibelius;Birth of Anita Ward; "That'll Be the Day" by Buddy Holly and The Crickets becomes a US No. 1 hit; Harry Belafonte has a big hit that reached number five on the Billboard charts with the calypso song "Day-O"; At the Gate of Horn is the second solo album by American folk singer Odetta who was a seminal influence on the folksingers of the 1960s. John Lennon and Paul McCartney meet in Liverpool.
  • 1956 in music, 1956 in British music, 1956 in Norwegian music – The first Eurovision Song Contest is held on 24 May, Elvis Presley appears on The Ed Sullivan Show; Odetta Sings Ballads and Blues is the influential debut solo album by American folk singer Odetta.
  • 1955 in music, 1955 in British music, 1955 in Norwegian music – Cole Porter's Silk Stockings; Deaths of George Enescu and Charlie Parker; "Rock Around the Clock" becomes first worldwide No. 1 rock and roll record; Little Richard records "Tutti-Frutti", one of the first rock and roll songs; Birth of Yo-Yo Ma, Harry James signs with Capitol releasing Harry James in Hi-Fi, Lonnie Donegan released "Rock Island Line".
  • 1954 in music, 1954 in British music, 1954 in Norwegian music
  • Death of Billy Murray
  • Elvis Presley's debut single, "That's All Right", is released on Sun Records
  • First Fender Stratocaster produced
  • 1953 in music, 1953 in British music, 1953 in Norwegian music – Cole Porter's Can-Can; Death of Hank Williams, Death of Sergei Prokofiev, Soviet composer and pianist
  • 1952 in music, 1952 in British music, 1952 in Norwegian music – Birth of Joe Strummer, Johnny Thunders, The official UK singles chart is launched; Recording Industry Association of America (or RIAA) established
  • 1951 in music, 1951 in British music, 1951 in Norwegian music – "Rocket 88" is recorded by Ike Turner and hailed as the first rock 'n' roll song; The Rake's Progress by Igor Stravinsky premieres in Venice. Birth of Joey Ramone; The King and I by Rodgers and Hammerstein; death of Arnold Schoenberg
  • 1950 in music, 1950 in British music, 1950 in Norwegian music – Births of Stevie Wonder, Tom Petty, Agnetha Fältskog; Cartoon voice actor Mel Blanc releases the song I Tawt I Taw a Puddy Tat as his classic Looney Tunes characters Tweety and Sylvester; Deaths of Kurt Weill, Al Jolson, Vaslav Nijinsky

Main article: 1940s in music

  • 1949 in music, 1949 in British music, 1949 in Norwegian music – Birth of Bruce Springsteen, Maureen McGovern, Valery Leontiev, Paul Rodgers, Billy Joel, Roger Taylor and Mark Knopfler; RCA Victor introduces 45 RPM records; South Pacific by Rodgers and Hammerstein
  • 1948 in music, 1948 in British music, 1948 in Norwegian music – Birth of Robert Plant, John Bonham, Steven Tyler, Donna Summer, Johnny Ramone, Ted Nugent, James Taylor, Alice Cooper, Jackson Browne, Kenny Loggins, Ian Paice, Olivia Newton-John, and Ozzy Osbourne; Kiss Me, Kate – Cole Porter; Four Last Songs – Richard Strauss; Columbia Records introduces 331/3 RPM (LP) records.
  • 1947 in music, 1947 in British music, 1947 in Norwegian music – Birth of Elton John, David Bowie, Bob Weir, Brian Johnson, Emmylou Harris, Arlo Guthrie, Tracy Nelson, Paul Brady, Tim Buckley, Jim Messina, Mick Fleetwood, Organum, Jeff Lynne and Carlos Santana
  • 1946 in music, 1946 in British music, 1946 in Norwegian music – Birth of Freddie Mercury, Toquinho, Keith Moon, Benny Andersson, Bon Scott, Donovan, Linda Ronstadt, Marianne Faithfull, Gram Parsons, Cher, Patti Smith David Gilmour, John Paul Jones and Dolly Parton
  • 1945 in music, 1945 in British music, 1945 in Norwegian music – Birth of Bob Marley, Pete Townshend, Neil Young, Van Morrison, Bob Seger, Bette Midler, Deborah Harry, Anne Murray, Carly Simon, John Fogerty, Rod Stewart, Kim Carnes, Davy Jones, Micky Dolenz, Anni-Frid Lyngstad, Björn Ulvaeus, John McVie, Ian Gillan, Roger Glover, Ritchie Blackmore, Itzhak Perlman, Debbie Harry and Eric Clapton; Death of Jerome Kern; Peter Grimes by Benjamin Britten premieres in London; Carousel – Rodgers and Hammerstein; Metamorphosen by Richard Strauss;
  • 1944 in music, 1944 in British music, 1944 in Norwegian music – Birth of Keith Emerson, Barry White, Diana Ross, Jeff Beck, Chico Buarque, Marvin Hamlisch, Roger Daltrey, John Entwistle, Booker T. Jones, Joe Cocker, Patti LaBelle, Gladys Knight, Gary Glitter, Brenda Lee, Townes Van Zandt, Mary Wilson (singer) and Jimmy Page; Disappearance of Glenn Miller,
  • 1943 in music, 1943 in British music, 1943 in Norwegian music – Birth of Mick Jagger, Keith Richards, Jim Morrison, George Harrison, Janis Joplin, Joni Mitchell, Robbie Robertson, Richard Manuel, John Denver, Jack Bruce, Barry Manilow, Christine McVie, Jim Croce, Carlos, Gavin Bryars, Bobby Sherman, Roger Waters and Richard Wright; Death of Lorenz Hart, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Formation of Rodgers and Hammerstein, Carl Ruggles, Evocations; The original Broadway production of Oklahoma! opened on March 31, 1943 at the St. James Theatre in New York City.
  • 1942 in music, 1942 in British music, 1942 in Norwegian music – Birth of Paul McCartney, Jimi Hendrix, Brian Jones, John P. Hammond, Ronnie James Dio, Brian Wilson, Jerry Garcia, Peter Tork, Michael Nesmith, Aretha Franklin, Barbra Streisand, Carole King, Rick Danko, Lou Reed, Paul Butterfield, Jerry Jeff Walker and Tammy Wynette; Death of George M. Cohan
  • 1941 in music, 1941 in British music, 1941 in Norwegian music – Birth of Bob Dylan, Joan Baez, Paul Simon, Art Garfunkel, Hank Marvin, Otis Redding, Jon Lord, Chubby Checker, Aaron Neville, Charlie Watts, Neil Diamond, Richie Havens, Cass Elliot, Wilson Pickett, Linda McCartney and Ritchie Valens; Les Paul builds one of the first solid-body electric guitars;
  • 1940 in music, 1940 in British music, 1940 in Norwegian music – Birth of John Lennon, Ringo Starr, Frank Zappa, Tom Jones, Vicente Fernández, Dionne Warwick, Cliff Richard, Phil Ochs, Levon Helm, Nancy Sinatra, Denny Doherty, Smokey Robinson, Ricky Nelson, Tim Hardin, Dionne Warwick, Bobby Hatfield, Bill Medley and (both of the Righteous Brothers)
  • 1939 in music, 1939 in British music, 1939 in Norwegian music – Birth of Judy Collins, Marvin Gaye, Ray Manzarek, Ginger Baker, Tina Turner and Grace Slick; Cole Porter's DuBarry Was a Lady; Judy Garland records "Over the Rainbow"
  • 1938 in music, 1938 in British music, 1938 in Norwegian music – Birth of Peter Yarrow, Gordon Lightfoot, Ben E. King, Death of Robert Johnson, Benny Goodman presents a jazz concert in Carnegie Hall; Death of Dan W. Quinn
  • 1937 in music, 1937 in British music, 1937 in Norwegian music – Death of George Gershwin, Birth of Roberta Flack, Waylon Jennings, Merle Haggard, Garth Hudson, Tom Paxton, Philip Glass, Dame Shirley Bassey, Carl Orff's Carmina Burana premieres
  • 1936 in music, 1936 in British music, 1936 in Norwegian music – Birth of Buddy Holly, Roy Orbison, Kris Kristofferson, Bill Wyman, Dave Van Ronk, Steve Reich, Bobby Darin, Billboard publishes first U.S. music chart
  • 1935 in music, 1935 in British music, 1935 in Norwegian music – Birth of Elvis Presley, Jerry Lee Lewis, Gene Vincent, Luciano Pavarotti, Ronnie Hawkins, Johnnie Mathis, John Phillips, Lou Rawls, La Monte Young, Terry Riley; Audiovox produce first electric bass guitar; Porgy and Bess by George Gershwin premieres in New York
  • 1934 in music, 1934 in British music, 1934 in Norwegian music – Cole Porter's Anything Goes; Birth of Leonard Cohen, Jackie Wilson; Tammy Grimes, Bob Shane, King Curtis, Florence Henderson, Renata Scotto, Shirley Jones, Otis Rush, Frankie Valli, Pat Boone, André Prévost, Freddie King, Brian Epstein, Dave Guard, Del Shannon; Deaths of Edward Elgar and Gustav Holst
  • 1933 in music, 1933 in British music, 1933 in Norwegian music – Birth of James Brown, Quincy Jones, Willie Nelson, Nina Simone, Yoko Ono, Nick Reynolds
  • 1932 in music, 1932 in British music, 1932 in Norwegian musicNight and Day by Cole Porter; Birth of Johnny Cash, Petula Clark, Patsy Cline, Glenn Gould, Loretta Lynn, Miriam Makeba Carl Perkins, Little Richard, and John Williams; Death of John Philip Sousa; Adolph Rickenbacker produces first electric guitar; Bell Labs creates first stereophonic sound recordings
  • 1931 in music, 1931 in British music, 1931 in Norwegian music – Birth of Teresa Brewer, Sam Cooke, João Gilberto, George Jones and Phyllis McGuire; Death of Anna Pavlova
  • 1930 in music, 1930 in British music, 1930 in Norwegian music – Birth of Ray Charles, Herbie Mann, Odetta, Sonny Rollins, Stephen Sondheim, and The Big Bopper
  • 1929 in music, 1929 in British music, 1929 in Norwegian music – Cole Porter's Fifty Million Frenchmen; Birth of Beverly Sills, Bill Evans, Dick Clark, Berry Gordy, Henri Pousseur
  • 1928 in music, 1928 in British music, 1928 in Norwegian music – Birth of Bo Diddley and Karlheinz Stockhausen; Fats Domino The Threepenny Opera by Kurt Weill and Bertolt Brecht (libretto) premieres in Berlin
  • 1927 in music, 1927 in British music, 1927 in Norwegian music – Jerome Kern's Show Boat; Igor Stravinsky's Apollo; Birth of Harry Belafonte, Antônio Carlos Jobim, Patti Page, Ralph Stanley
  • 1926 in music, 1926 in British music, 1926 in Norwegian musicTapiola by Jean Sibelius; Birth of Marilyn Monroe, Joan Sutherland, John Coltrane, Miles Davis, Chuck Berry, Tony Bennett, Big Mama Thornton; Turandot by Giacomo Puccini premieres in Milan
  • 1925 in music, 1925 in British music, 1925 in Norwegian music – Birth of Celia Cruz, B.B. King and Pierre Boulez; Big record labels begin using electric microphones for recording; 78 RPM adopted as standard for records; BBC makes first radio broadcast in stereo; Wozzeck by Alban Berg premieres in Berlin, Carl Ruggles, Portals. Debut of the Grand Ole Opry.
  • 1924 in music, 1924 in British music, 1924 in Norwegian music – Gershwin's Rhapsody in Blue premieres in New York; the Symphony No. 7 by Jean Sibelius; Death of Giacomo Antonio Domenico Michele Secondo Maria Puccini, Italian opera composer, Carl Ruggles. Men and Mountains. Debut of the National Barn Dance, the first radio program devoted to country music.
  • 1923 in music, 1923 in British music, 1923 in Norwegian music – Birth of Hank Williams, First recordings by Louis Armstrong, Bessie Smith, and many other African-American artists, Carl Ruggles, Vox clamans in deserto
  • 1922 in music, 1922 in British music, 1922 in Norwegian music – Birth of Judy Garland.
  • 1921 in music, 1921 in British music, 1921 in Norwegian music – Death of Enrico Caruso, Carl Ruggles Angels
  • 1920 in music, 1920 in British music, 1920 in Norwegian music – Birth of Charlie Parker, Ravi Shankar, Isaac Stern; Death of Alberto Nepomuceno, Brazilian composer, pianist, organist and conductor.
  • 1919 in music, 1919 in British music, 1919 in Norwegian music – Birth of Pete Seeger, Merce Cunningham, Carl Ruggles, Toys
  • 1918 in music, 1918 in British music, 1918 in Norwegian music – Phonograph cylinders become obsolete; the Society for Private Musical Performances is founded in Vienna by Arnold Schoenberg; Death of Claude Debussy
  • 1917 in music, 1917 in British music, 1917 in Norwegian music – Birth of Lou Harrison, Ella Fitzgerald, John Lee Hooker, Dinu Lipatti, Isang Yun; First hit jazz recordings by Original Dixieland Jass Band, Death of Scott Joplin
  • 1916 in music, 1916 in British music, 1916 in Norwegian music – Birth of Milton Babbitt, Henri Dutilleux, Alberto Ginastera, Betty Grable, Harry James, Dinah Shore,
  • 1915 in music, 1915 in British music, 1915 in Norwegian musicAn Alpine Symphony by Richard Strauss; Birth of Billie Holiday, Frank Sinatra, John Serry, Sr.; Tom Brown starts billing his group as a "Jass Band"
  • 1914 in music, 1914 in British music, 1913 in Norwegian music – "St. Louis Blues" published; first calypso music recordings
  • 1913 in music, 1913 in British music, 1913 in Norwegian music – Birth of Muddy Waters, Vinicius de Moraes; Igor Stravinsky's The Rite of Spring is premiered in Paris.
  • 1912 in music, 1912 in Norwegian music – Birth of Woody Guthrie, Lightnin' Hopkins, John Cage
  • 1911 in music, 1911 in Norwegian music – Birth of Robert Johnson, Der Rosenkavalier by Richard Strauss premieres in Dresden, Death of Gustav Mahler, Austrian composer and conductor
  • 1910 in music, 1910 in Norwegian music – Birth of Howlin' Wolf, Artie Shaw, John H. Hammond, Django Reinhardt; "Let Me Call You Sweetheart"
  • 1909 in music, 1909 in Norwegian music – Death of Francisco Tárrega; Elektra by Richard Strauss premieres in Dresden; Birth of Benny Goodman
  • 1908 in music, 1908 in Norwegian music – The two first atonal pieces are composed, first by Béla Bartók and then by Arnold Schoenberg.
  • 1907 in music, 1907 in Norwegian music – Death of Edvard Grieg, Norwegian composer (b. 1843); Birth of Gene Autry, Cab Calloway, Benny Carter, Kate Smith
  • 1906 in music, 1906 in Norwegian music – Birth of Dmitri Shostakowich, soviet composer and pianist, Victor begins selling the Victrola phonograph player for .00; Len Spencer, I Am The Edison Phonograph --- earliest recorded advert played in Phonograph shops to sell the devices; the Symphony No. 8 by Gustav Mahler
  • 1905 in music, 1905 in Norwegian musicThe Merry Widow by Franz Lehár premieres in Vienna; Salome by Richard Strauss premieres in Dresden
  • 1904 in music, 1904 in Norwegian music – The Violin Concerto (Sibelius) by Jean Sibelius; Death of Antonín Dvořák, Czech composer, Madama Butterfly by Giacomo Puccini premieres in Milan
  • 1903 in music, 1903 in Norwegian musicValse triste by Jean Sibelius; Birth of Bing Crosby and Vladimir Horowitz
  • 1902 in music, 1902 in Norwegian music – Birth of Richard Rodgers, Pelléas et Mélisande by Claude Debussy premieres in Paris
  • 1901 in music, 1901 in Norwegian music – Birth of Louis Armstrong, Death of Giuseppe Verdi, Italian composer
  • 1900 in music, 1900 in Norwegian musicTosca by Giacomo Puccini premieres in Rome
  • 1899 in music, 1899 in Norwegian musicRusalka by Antonín Dvořák; Ein Heldenleben by Richard Strauss; Symphony No. 1 and publication of Finlandia by Jean Sibelius; Shéhérazade by Maurice Ravel; Enigma Variations by Edward Elgar; "Maple Leaf Rag" by Scott Joplin; Death of Johann Strauss II; Birth of Duke Ellington
  • 1898 in music, 1898 in Norwegian music – Birth of George Gershwin, Paul Robeson
  • 1897 in music, 1897 in Norwegian music – Ragtime music becomes popular in the United States; Death of Brahms, Birth of Marian Anderson
  • 1896 in music, 1896 in Norwegian musicAlso sprach Zarathustra by Richard Strauss; Jungfrun i tornet by Jean Sibelius; Death of Carlos Gomes, Brazilian composer and opera composer and Anton Bruckner, Austrian composer and organist
  • 1895 in music, 1895 in Norwegian musicThe Swan of Tuonela by Jean Sibelius; Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks by Richard Strauss; George W. Johnson becomes first African American recording artist with "The Laughing Song"; Birth of Carl Orff, Oscar Hammerstein II, William Grant Still, the "Dean of African-American music"
  • 1894 in music, 1894 in Norwegian music – Cello Concerto and Humoresques by Antonín Dvořák
  • 1893 in music, 1893 in Norwegian music – Symphony No. 9 and String Quartet No. 12 by Antonín Dvořák; Symphony No. 3 by Gustav Mahler; Karelia Suite by Jean Sibelius; Death of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer
  • 1892 in music, 1892 in Norwegian music – Dan W. Quinn makes first recordings in New York City; Kullervo by Jean Sibelius; Pagliacci by Ruggero Leoncavallo; The Nutcracker by Marius Petipa
  • 1891 in music, 1891 in Norwegian music – Piano Trio No. 4 by Antonín Dvořák; Birth of Sergei Prokofiev, Soviet composer and pianist
  • 1890 in music, 1890 in Norwegian music – John Philip Sousa makes first recordings with Columbia Phonograph Company; Birth of Bronislava Nijinska, choreographer
  • 1889 in music, 1889 in Norwegian music – Birth of Vaslav Nijinsky, – Ballet dancer (d. 1950); Effie Stewart records first serious classical music at Edison's Menlo Park; First Phonograph Parlor opens in San Francisco; Kaiser-Walzer by Johann Strauss II; Death and Transfiguration by Richard Strauss.
  • 1888 in music, 1888 in Norwegian music – The Symphony No. 2 by Gustav Mahler; Birth of Lead Belly; Death of Charles-Valentin Alkan, French composer and ultra virtuoso pianist; Wax phonograph cylinders commercially marketed; Emile Berliner invents lateral-cut disc records.
  • 1887 in music, 1887 in Norwegian music – The Havanaise (Saint-Saëns) by Camille Saint-Saëns; Birth of Heitor Villa-Lobos, Brazilian composer, cellist, and guitarist
  • 1886 in music, 1886 in Norwegian musicThe Carnival of the Animals and the Symphony No. 3 by Camille Saint-Saëns; birth of Marcel Dupré, Al Jolson, Paul Paray, Othmar Schoeck; Franz Liszt publishes his final Hungarian Rhapsody; death of Franz Liszt.
  • 1885 in music, 1885 in Norwegian musicThe Mikado – Arthur Sullivan; The Gypsy Baron by Johann Strauss II; Birth of Jerome Kern
  • 1884 in music, 1884 in Norwegian music – Birth of Sophie Tucker
  • 1883 in music, 1883 in Norwegian music – Birth of Edgard Varèse, Death of Richard Wagner, German composer
  • 1882 in music, 1882 in Norwegian music – Birth of Igor Stravinsky, Russian composer, Parsifal by Richard Wagner premieres in Bayreuth; Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky – 1812 Overture premiere
  • 1881 in music, 1881 in Norwegian music – Births of Béla Bartók and George Enescu
  • 1880 in music, 1880 in Norwegian musicStabat Mater and "Songs My Mother Taught Me" by Antonín Dvorák; The Violin Concerto No. 3 (Saint-Saëns) by Camille Saint-Saëns; Death of Jacques Offenbach, composer (b. 1819)
  • 1879 in music, 1879 in Norwegian music – Birth of Jean Cras
  • 1878 in music – Birth of George M. Cohan; William S. Gilbert and Arthur Sullivan, H.M.S. Pinafore; reshapes British and American musical theater;
  • 1877 in music – Phonograph and phonograph cylinder invented by Thomas Alva Edison; Samson and Delilah by Camille Saint-Saëns Birth of Billy Murray (singer)
  • 1876 in musicSiegfried and Götterdämmerung by Richard Wagner premiere in Bayreuth; Birth of Carl Ruggles
  • 1875 in music – Birth of Joseph-Maurice Ravel, French composer and pianist; Carmen by Georges Bizet premieres in Paris; Swan Lake by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky premiers
  • 1874 in musicBoris Gudonov by Modest Mussorgsky premieres in Saint Petersburg; Die Fledermaus by Johann Strauss II premieres in Vienna; Richard Wagner concludes Götterdämmerung, finishing The Ring Cycle; Requiem (Verdi) by Giuseppe Verdi; Danse macabre by Camille Saint-Saëns; Birth of Arnold Schoenberg
  • 1873 in music – Birth of Enrico Caruso, Sergei Rachmaninoff, Russian composer, ultra virtuoso pianist and conductor
  • 1872 in music – The Cello Concerto No. 1 (Saint-Saëns) by Camille Saint-Saëns; Birth of Ralph Vaughan Williams, English composer; birth of Sergei Diaghilev, choreographer (d. 1929)
  • 1871 in music – Richard Wagner concludes Siegfried; Aida by Giuseppe Verdi premieres in Cairo
  • 1870 in musicDie Walküre (the Valkyrie) by Richard Wagner premieres in Munich
  • 1869 in music – Death of Hector Berlioz, French composer, Das Rheingold by Richard Wagner premieres in Munich
  • 1868 in music – Death of Gioachino Rossini, Italian composer, Die Meistersinger von Nürnberg by Richard Wagner premières in Munich; Ein deutsches Requiem by Johannes Brahms premières in Bremen; Wiegenlied by Brahms (Brahms' Lullaby); Tales from the Vienna Woods by Johann Strauss II; the Piano Concerto No. 2 (Saint-Saëns) by Camille Saint-Saëns
  • 1867 in music Birth of Scott Joplin, famous ragtime composer; The Blue Danube by Johann Strauss II; Roméo et Juliette (opera) by Charles Gounod; Peer Gynt by Edvard Grieg
  • 1866 in music – Franz Liszt completes his oratorio Christus; Birth of French composer Erik Satie.
  • 1865 in music – Birth of Finnish composer Jean Sibelius; Tristan und Isolde by Richard Wagner premieres in Munich, marking the beginning of the end for traditional tonality; The Symphony No. 1 by Antonín Dvorak; Franz Liszt publishes his solo piano transcriptions of the full Beethoven Symphonies 1 – 9.
  • 1864 in music Birth of Richard Strauss, German composer, Alberto Nepomuceno, Brazilian composer, pianist, organist and conductor
  • 1863 in music– The Introduction and Rondo Capriccioso by Camille Saint-Saëns; Birth of Ernesto Nazareth
  • 1862 in music – Birth of French composer Claude Debussy
  • 1861 in music – Birth of Anton Arensky; Franz Liszt completes his first Mephisto Waltz The Dance in the Village Inn.
  • 1860 in music – Birth of Gustav Mahler, Austrian composer and conductor
  • 1859 in musicFaust by Charles Gounod premieres in Paris; Richard Wagner concludes Tristan und Isolde; In 1859, John Freeman Young published the English translation of Silent Night that is most frequently sung today.
  • 1858 in music – Birth of Medardo Rosso and Giacomo Puccini, Italian opera composer, Orphée aux enfers by Jacques Offenbach, the first operetta, premieres in Paris; Hector Berlioz writes Les Troyens; Johann Strauss II writes Tritsch-Tratsch-Polka
  • 1857 in music – First public performance of Franz Liszt's Piano Sonata in B Minor
  • 1856 in music – Death of Robert Schuman, German composer and pianist; Richard Wagner, German composer, concludes Die Walküre
  • 1855 in music – Birth of Ernest Chausson
  • 1854 in music – Richard Wagner, German composer, concludes Das Rheingold
  • 1853 in musicIl trovatore by Giuseppe Verdi premieres in Rome; La traviata by Verdi premieres in Venice
  • 1852 in music – Birth of Charles Villiers Stanford, Irish composer, teacher and conductor; birth of Francisco Tárrega, Spanish composer and guitarist
  • 1851 in musicRigoletto by Giuseppe Verdi premieres in Venice
  • 1850 in musicLohengrin by Richard Wagner premieres in Weimar; Foster's Plantation Melodies by Stephen Foster, including "Camptown Races"
  • 1849 in music – Death of Frédéric Chopin, Polish composer and pianist; Franz Liszt publishes his Three Concert Études, alongside completing Funérailles.
  • 1848 in musicAlbum for the Young by Robert Schumann; Death of Gaetano Donizetti, Italian opera composer
  • 1847 in music – "Oh! Susanna" by Stephen Foster published
  • 1846 in music – Adolphe Sax invents the saxophone
  • 1845 in musicTannhäuser by Richard Wagner premières in Dresden; The Violin Concerto by Felix Mendelssohn
  • 1844 in music – Birth of Nikolai Rimsky-Korsakov and Charles-Marie Widor
  • 1843 in music – Birth of Edvard Grieg, Norwegian composer (d. 1907); Minstrel show premieres in United States; The Flying Dutchman by Richard Wagner premieres in Dresden
  • 1842 in music – "Lisztomania" sweeps Europe
  • 1841 in music – Birth of Antonín Dvořák, Czech composer; Nabucco by Giuseppe Verdi
  • 1840 in music – Birth of Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, Russian composer; Death of Niccolò Paganini, Italian composer and ultra virtuoso violinist
  • 1839 in musicBlumenstück by Robert Schumann
  • 1838 in musicKinderszenen by Robert Schumann
  • 1837 in musicRequiem (Berlioz) by Hector Berlioz
  • 1836 in music – Birth of Carlos Gomes, Brazilian composer and opera composer, Les Huguenots by Giacomo Meyerbeer premieres in Paris
  • 1835 in music – Death of Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini, Italian opera composer, Lucia di Lammermoor by Gaetano Donizetti premieres in Naples; Gaetano Corticelli is in vogue in salons of Bologna, Italy featuring his terzettis and fantasies; I puritani by Vincenzo Bellini premieres
  • 1834 in musicDie Neue Zeitschrift für Musik first published by Robert Schumann
  • 1833 in music – Johannes Brahms born
  • 1832 in music – Death of Muzio Clementi, Italian composer and pianist
  • 1831 in musicLa sonnambula and Norma by Vincenzo Bellini
  • 1830 in musicSymphonie Fantastique by Hector Berlioz is written; The Hebrides (overture) by Felix Mendelssohn; Anna Bolena by Gaetano Donizetti; and I Capuleti e i Montecchi by Vincenzo Bellini
  • 1829 in music – The Italian Symphony, the Scottish Symphony, and the Songs Without Words by Felix Mendelssohn; Birth of Anton Rubinstein, Russian composer and ultra virtuoso pianist
  • 1828 in music – Franz Schubert dies
  • 1827 in music – Ludwig van Beethoven dies; Winterreise by Franz Schubert; Il pirata by Vincenzo Bellini
  • 1826 in music – June 5, Death of Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber, German opera composer. String Quartet No. 14 in C Sharp minor by Ludwig van Beethoven was completed. October 31, Muzio Clementi's complete Gradus ad Parnassum (100 pieces) appears for the first time, simultaneously in Paris, Leipzig and London.
  • 1825 in music – Birth of Johann Strauss II, Austrian composer; Songs from Sir Walter Scott by Franz Schubert, including "Ellens dritter Gesang" (Schubert's Ave Maria); The Octet by Felix Mendelssohn
  • 1824 in music – Birth of Anton Bruckner, Austrian composer and organist; Beethoven's 9th Symphony
  • 1823 in music' – Die schöne Müllerin by Franz Schubert
  • 1822 in music
  • 1821 in musicDer Freischütz by Carl Maria von Weber, premieres in Berlin
  • 1820 in music
  • 1819 in music – April 16, The publication of Muzio Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum Volume II is entered at Stationer's Hall, London. September 13, Birth of Clara Schumann, German pianist and composer.
  • 1818 in musicHammerklavier sonate by Ludwig van Beethoven; "Silent Night" written by Josef Mohr and composed by Franz Xaver Gruber, – The first performance of Silent Night on December 25, (Church of St. Nikolaus in Oberndorf, Austria).
  • 1817 in music – March 1, Muzio Clementi's Gradus ad Parnassum Volume I is published simultaneously in London, Paris and Leipzig.
  • 1816 in musicIl barbiere di Siviglia (The Barber of Seville) by Gioachino Rossini, premieres in Rome
  • 1815 in music
  • 1814 in music
  • 1813 in music – Birth of French-Jewish composer and ultra virtuoso pianist Charles-Valentin Alkan; Birth of German composer Richard Wagner; Birth of Italian composer Giuseppe Verdi.
  • 1812 in music – Birth of German composer Friedrich von Flotow; Birth of Swiss composer and virtuoso pianist Sigismund Thalberg.
  • 1811 in music – Birth of Hungarian composer and virtuoso pianist Franz Liszt.
  • 1810 in music – Birth of Polish composer and virtuoso pianist Frédéric Chopin; Birth of German composer and virtuoso pianist Robert Schumann; Ludwig van Beethoven completes his Fifth Piano Concerto Emperor.
  • 1809 in music – Birth of Felix Mendelssohn-Bartholdy, German composer, pianist, organist and conductor; Death of Joseph Haydn, Austrian composer
  • 1808 in music – Beethoven completes his 6th Symphony "Pastoral", Beethoven's 5th Symphony
  • 1807 in musicLa Vestale by Gaspare Spontini
  • 1806 in musicFourth Piano Concerto,Violin Concerto by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • 1805 in musicFidelio by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • 1804 in musicSymphony No. 3 'Eroica' by Ludwig van Beethoven
  • 1803 in music – Birth of Hector Berlioz, French composer
  • 1802 in music – Bach's Sonatas and partitas for solo violin are published by Bote and Bock
  • 1801 in music – Birth of Vincenzo Salvatore Carmelo Francesco Bellini, Italian opera composer, Beethoven's Moonlight Sonata
  • 1800 in music
  • 1789 in music – Mozart's Così fan tutte
  • 1788 in music – Death of Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, German composer and keyboardist
  • 1787 in music – Mozart's Don Giovanni
  • 1786 in music – Birth of Carl Maria Friedrich Ernst von Weber, German opera composer, Mozart's Le nozze di Figaro (The marriage of Figaro)
  • 1785 in music – Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart composes his Piano Concerto No. 21
  • 1784 in music
  • 1783 in music
  • 1782 in music – Birth of Niccolò Paganini, Italian composer and ultra virtuoso violinist; Death of Johann Christian Bach, German composer, Mozart's Die Entführung aus dem Serail (The Abduction from the Seraglio)
  • 1781 in music
  • 1780 in music
  • 1739 in music – The Clavier-Übung III by Johann Sebastian Bach is published
  • 1738 in music
  • 1737 in music
  • 1736 in musicAlexander's Feast by George Frideric Handel
  • 1735 in music – Birth of Johann Christian Bach, German composer
  • 1734 in music
  • 1733 in musicLa serva padrona by Giovanni Battista Pergolesi, the first opera buffa, premieres in Naples; Hippolyte et Aricie by Jean-Philippe Rameau, premieres in Paris, Death of François Couperin, French composer and harpsichordist
  • 1732 in music – Joseph Haydn born
  • 1731 in music
  • 1730 in music
  • 1729 in music
  • 1728 in musicThe Beggar's Opera by John Gay and Johann Christoph Pepusch, premieres in London
  • 1727 in musicZadok the Priest (the coronation anthem) by George Frideric Handel, Johann Sebastian Bach finishes and presents his St Matthew Passion
  • 1726 in music
  • 1725 in music – publication of Twelve concerti, Op. 8 by Antonio Vivaldi, including the Four Seasons – Death of Alessandro Scarlatti, Italian composer
  • 1724 in musicGiulio Cesare by George Frideric Handel premières in London, Johann Sebastian Bach presents his St John Passion
  • 1723 in music – Vivaldi composes The Four Seasons
  • 1722 in music – Johann Sebastian Bach finishes the Book I from The Well-Tempered Clavier, Traité de l'harmonie by Jean-Philippe Rameau causes a revolution in music theory.
  • 1721 in music
  • 1720 in music – Johann Sebastian Bach presents his Brandenburg Concertos to Christian Ludwig; Johann Sebastian Bach completes the Sonatas and partitas for solo violin
  • 1689 in musicDido and Aeneas, opera, by Henry Purcell and Nahum Tate (libretto) performed
  • 1688 in music
  • 1687 in music – Death of Jean-Baptiste Lully, French composer
  • 1686 in music
  • 1685 in musicAlbion and Albanius, opera, by Louis Grabu; Birth of: Johann Sebastian Bach and Georg Friedrich Häendel (German composers, organists and harpsichordists); Domenico Scarlatti, Italian composer and harpsichordist
  • 1684 in music
  • 1683 in music – Birth of Jean-Philippe Rameau, French composer and music theorist
  • 1682 in music
  • 1681 in music
  • 1680 in music
  • 1619 in music – Michael Praetorius, Polyhymnia caduceatrix
  • 1618 in music
  • 1617 in music – Johann Hermann Schein, Banchetto musicale
  • 1616 in music
  • 1615 in music
  • 1614 in music – Marco da Gagliano, Sacrarum cantionum
  • 1613 in music
  • 1612 in music
  • 1611 in music – William Byrd, Fantasia a 6, No. 3; Carlo Gesualdo, Morro lasso al mio duolo
  • 1610 in music – Claudio Monteverdi, Vespro della Beata Vergine 1610

1490s and 1500s[edit]

Early history[edit]

15th century[edit]

14th century[edit]

13th century[edit]

12th century[edit]

Ancient music[edit]

See also[edit]

References[edit]

  1. ^ "Bring Me the Horizon on how divorce and trauma shaped new album 'Amo': 'Everything boils down to love in the end'". August 25, 2018.
  2. ^ "Maynard James Keenan says Tool's new album is coming in 2019". September 10, 2018.
  3. ^ Madonna Breaks iTunes Pre-Order Record With 'MDNA' | Prefix Archived March 3, 2016, at the Wayback Machine
  4. ^ Hung Up
  5. ^ Lewis, Randy (April 8, 2009). "Beatles' catalog will be reissued September 9 in remastered versions". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved May 2, 2009.
  6. ^ Brown, Helen (April 23, 2012). "Norah Jones Little Broken Hearts CD review". The Daily Telegraph. Retrieved April 27, 2012.
  7. ^ "The boys are back". Windsor Star. August 7, 2008. Retrieved August 21, 2008.
  8. ^ "Linkin Park headlines Live Earth Tokyo". Live Earth, LLC. May 25, 2007. Archived from the original on March 6, 2012. Retrieved May 3, 2008.
  9. ^ "The Evolution of Britney Spears: 2000 – Oops... she did it again". MSN. May 12, 2011. Retrieved May 3, 2012.
  10. ^ "Usher Confessions part II Video". Black Entertainment Television. Retrieved June 23, 2012.
  11. ^ a b Byrne, Ciar (August 18, 2005). "The real Slim Shady stands up the fans on his European tour". London: The Independent. Archived from the original on May 14, 2009. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  12. ^ Raide, Stephanie (June 8, 2011). "Eminem – the Fast Rising Rapper". The Independent. London. Archived from the original on October 22, 2012. Retrieved May 10, 2012.
  13. ^ "Avril Lavigne Ends North American Run of Shows with Two Dates in Washington Beginning May 9". transworldnews.com. May 4, 2008. Archived from the original on December 5, 2008. Retrieved May 29, 2008.
  14. ^ "Evanescence Biography". Artistdirect. Retrieved September 23, 2012.
  15. ^ Putti, Laura (August 24, 2001). "Il nuovo Michael Jackson fa un tuffo nel passato". La Repubblica. Retrieved May 10, 2009.
  16. ^ Michael Jackson Archived September 3, 2009, at the Wayback Machine
  17. ^ a b MTV – Michael Jackson Biography Archived August 4, 2012, at the Wayback Machine
  18. ^ Sex
  19. ^ Hlavaty, Craig (February 13, 2012). "Whitney Houston: An Overview of Her Films". Houston Press. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
  20. ^ "Adele's 21 Closing in on Billboard Charts Record". Black Entertainment Television. January 26, 2012. Retrieved June 30, 2012.
  21. ^ Blakeley, Kiri (May 10, 2011). "Why Shania Twain Can't Sing". Forbes. Retrieved August 23, 2012.
  22. ^ Montgomery, James (February 1, 2010). "'You Oughta Know': The Story Behind Beyonce's Grammy Cover". MTV. MTV Network. Retrieved May 3, 2008.
  23. ^ Cashmere, Paul (April 24, 2008). "Mariah Carey Has the Right Energy in E=MC2". Undercover Pty., Ltd. Retrieved May 8, 2008.
  24. ^ Reporter, Metro (March 8, 2010). "Oscars 2010 special: Avatar v The Hurt Locker v Inglourious Basterds v Up In The Air". Metro.co.uk. Associated Newspapers. Retrieved March 23, 2010.
  25. ^ Bidasio, Claudia (May 19, 2008). "Gli imperdibili di Michel Jackson". MenStyle.it. Retrieved May 9, 2009.
  26. ^ "Michael Jackson sulla sedia a rotelle". Affari Italiani. July 11, 2008. Archived from the original on August 22, 2008. Retrieved May 10, 2009.
  27. ^ Anderson, Jason (June 15, 2009). "Learning to Love Celine Dion". Toronto: The Globe and Mail. Retrieved December 27, 2009.
  28. ^ "Girl gone wild: is it time for Madonna to grow up?". The Irish Times. March 23, 2012. Retrieved September 21, 2012.
  29. ^ Kawaguchi, Judith (October 23, 2007). "Words to Live by: Goh Hotoda". The Japan Times. Toshiaki Ogasawara. Retrieved December 2, 2009.
  30. ^ "With dreams in her heart". The Telegraph. April 28, 2001. Retrieved September 22, 2012.
  31. ^ dsussman (February 11, 2010). "The Top 10 Worst Albums that Went Platinum". Spike. Retrieved September 22, 2012.
  32. ^ Grossberg, Josh (July 25, 2007). "Backstreet Boys Unite!". E! Entertainment Television. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  33. ^ "Liz the 'Fame' Dame". BBC News. February 15, 2000. Retrieved January 7, 2012.
  34. ^ Lubkin, Gregory (Summer 2002). "Review: Music and Patronage in the Sforza Court, by Paul A. Merkley and Lora L. M. Merkley" Archived February 14, 2016, at the Wayback Machine. Journal of the American Musicological Society, Vol. 55, No. 2, pp. 346–353. Retrieved via JSTOR February 8, 2016 (subscription required).

External links[edit]

  • Music Timeline A Chronology of Music From Prehistory to the Present Day.

Retrieved from "https://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Timeline_of_musical_events&oldid=893504078"



Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (91 pictures) Pussy, 2018, cleavage
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (99 pics) Selfie, iCloud, butt
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (39 foto) Gallery, 2018, cleavage
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (11 images) Gallery, 2016, lingerie
Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (78 images) Sideboobs, 2020, braless
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (12 pics) Hacked, iCloud, cameltoe
Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (26 foto) Fappening, iCloud, in bikini
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (16 photo) Bikini, Twitter, legs
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (44 pics) Boobs, Snapchat, see through
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (89 foto) Fappening, Instagram, lingerie
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (15 fotos) Porno, Facebook, lingerie
Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (31 photos) Is a cute, Snapchat, braless

Porno Gillian Lewis naked (43 photo) Porno, Instagram, underwear

Porno Gillian Lewis naked (29 pictures) Video, iCloud, braless

Porno Gillian Lewis nude (45 images) Topless, Instagram, braless
Porno Gillian Lewis nude (15 images) Hot, iCloud, cameltoe
Porno Gillian Lewis nudes (61 photos) Gallery, YouTube, lingerie
Porno Gillian Lewis naked (86 pics) Topless, Facebook, cameltoe

 

2019 punchaceleb.com | Sitemap