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[March 28, 2019] CI 100th Anniversary - Celebration

CI friends and family,


As you know, this year we celebrate 100 years as a law enforcement agency. Over the next couple of months, you will have the opportunity to sign up for events, order commemorative items, and celebrate our rich history in a variety of ways. In an effort not to overload you with too much information in one email, we will discuss one event at a time. This email is specifically about the event to be held atAlcatraz on July 22

We have 2 events planned for Alcatraz. We intend to bring a group of about 100 people to the prison around 3 or 4pm on the 22nd. There will be a tour and a special opportunity to hear about inmates who were incarcerated as a result of IRS charges (or investigations). That tour will cost . After 2 1/2 hours, we'll be back on the wharf and will embark on our second event- a 2 hour boat cruise around the harbor with views of the sunset, the golden gate bridge and Alcatraz among other things. Passed appetizers and beer and wine are included in the 0 cost of that cruise.

 

Obviously we have to pay for these events up front so we will do this in 2 parts. Please RSVP to me if you plan to attend with the total number of attendees no later than April 12th. Once we have the list and numbers, we will send out a request for payment within 2 weeks of that date. This is the only way we can ensure we get the right price for the boats and are not left hanging.

 

YOU MAY GO TO ONE or BOTH EVENTS. Your choice! Please indicate what you are RSVP'ing for in your email.

 

(I am going to just Alcatraz and not the evening boat cruise)

(I am going to just the boat cruise and not the Alcatraz tour)

(I am going to BOTH Alcatraz and the evening boat tour)

 

Please feel free to pass this email on to any friends of CI, retirees, etc who may be interested in going.

 

Thanks and I look forward to hearing from you!

 

Justin

Justin T. Cole

Director, Communication & Education

IRS Criminal Investigation

1111 Constitution Ave., N.W, Room #2526

Washington, D.C. 20224

(202) 317-3930 – office

(202) 768-2110 – cell

[March 05, 2019] Sad News: Passing of Robert A. Diotkowski

Robert A. Dlotkowski Sr., age 77, Army Veteran of Orland Park.  Beloved husband of Dorianne (nee Buike).  Loving father of Robert Jr. (Amy) and Bonnie (John) Evans.  Dear grandfather of Joshua and Julia Evans and Samuel Edwin Dlotkowski.  Cherished son of the late Anton and Marie Dlotkowski.

Funeral Thursday 10am at RICHARD J MODELL FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICES, 12641 W. 143rd St., Homer Glen.

Interment Holy Sepulchre Cemetery.

In lieu of flowers donations to P.A.W.S. of Tinley Park appreciated.

Visitation Wednesday 2pm to 8pm.

708-301-3595

 


[November 27, 2018] New benefits are now offered to members...

New benefits are now offered to members, which include substantial discounts for travel and entertainment venues, as well as discounted legal advice and legal shield protection. Log in and check it out.

[November 13, 2018] Sad News: Passing of Special Agent Bryan Thiel

Friends and Colleagues,

 

The services for Special Agent Bryan Thiel is as follows:

 

Memorial Service

 

Friday, November 16th at 11:00 a.m.

Cherry Hills Community Church Chapel

3900 Grace Blvd., Highlands Ranch, CO 80126

 

The service will be family-friendly and children are welcome to attend.  It will be followed by a reception, also at the Cherry Hills Community Church.

 

 

 

Open House Reception

 

Saturday, November 17th from 4:00 – 8:00 p.m.

Heritage Greens Community Clubhouse

4814 E. Links Cir., Centennial, CO  80122

 

Memorial Website:  https://www.forevermissed.com/bryanthiel/#about

 

[July 10, 2018] Sad News: Passing of Thomas J. Clancy, AFSA-IRS Founding Father

 

THOMAS J. CLANCY

November 6, 1932 – July 8, 2018

 

 

 

Erin (Tom Clancy’s daughter) advised that Tom died yesterday, July 8, 2018.  She said he was diagnosed with a terminal illness and was under Hospice care.  Also, Tom’s wife, Mary died of pneumonia June 30, 2018 after a few month’s illness.  A joint memorial service will be held as follows:

 

Date:Saturday July 14, 2018 at 11:00 a.m.

 

Location:St. Ambrose Catholic Church

3901 Woodburn Rd.

Annandale, VA 

 

Burial immediately 

following at:

 

Fairfax Memorial Park

9900 Braddock Rd.

Fairfax, VA 22032

 

Erin told me that the family is not having a reception or luncheon after the joint memorial service, but they would be really pleased if his co-workers introduced themselves to the family, particularly following burial.  She repeatedly expressed to me that she knew of his great fondness for his job as a special agent and of the many agents with whom he worked.  Also, Erin said that the family is keeping Tom’s email open for a while and will be honored to receive emails from former co-workers at any time.  I interpreted that to mean she would be really pleased to receive emails before the memorial service if persons so chose.  Tom’s email address is”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Tom played a major and most significant role in the formation and early functions of AFSA beginning in 1988, the year this Association was established.  He was one of the ten founders of the Association and assisted in every aspect of the formation of AFSA and development of the organization's sense of purpose and direction.  His initial guidance was provided in the capacity of President. He was unanimously named President by the other founding members, and he served as President for the years 1988 through 1991.  Upon completion of his final term in that capacity, he continued to serve on the Board of Directors as an at-large Director for the year 1992.

 

While serving as President and Director in the early days and years of the organization, Tom gave freely of his time and counsel.  He worked tirelessly with the other founding members and others who became involved in support of AFSA.  Tom established AFSA's first database of members on his personal computer, and he personally entered the data into the recordkeeping system that he developed. He was a hands-on administrator who never shirked even mundane duties essential to promotion of the organization and for achieving membership growth.  For example, Tom arranged for the printing of AFSA Newsletters and provided the mailing labels.  Once those newsletters were on hand, Tom joined other members to fold them and affix the mailing labels to prepare them for delivery to the Post Office.

 

As President, Tom presided at AFSA's annual meetings in 1990 and 1991 and conducted numerous meetings of the Board of Directors (the other officers and the Directors) who were the founding members.  He provided guidance and direction at all meetings with an emphasis on expansion of the membership and defining the purpose of the organization.  He was always open to the suggestions of others and willing to let everyone have an opportunity to convey their ideas.  

 

Even since his tenure as an officer and Director of AFSA was completed, he has continued to support the Association.  Tom has attended a number of annual meetings and participated in the social events as well as the business meetings.  He has also been one of the regular attendees at the monthly luncheons in the DC area for retired and current special agents.

 

In summary, Tom Clancy was a steady hand and a major contributor during the formative stage of AFSA, and he continues to support and encourage success for this organization. 

 

 

 

[April 22, 2018] Sad News: Passing of MARK L. COHEN

Mark L. Cohen, Age 62. Loving husband of Renee nee Rockoff. Devoted father of Chani (Ben) Unell and Yossi (Simcha) Cohen. Proud grandfather of Nina and Talya. Service Thursday 2:00 PM at Chicago Jewish Funerals, 8851 Skokie Blvd (at Niles Center Road), Skokie. Interment Shalom. In lieu of flowers, memorials can be made to your favorite charity.

[January 10, 2018] Sad News: Passing of Tyrone G. Barney

Tyrone Glen Barney was born in Baltimore, Maryland on July 19, 1954 to Thomas Leroy Freeman and Marian Catherine Freeman. The fourth of seven children, Tyrone was raised in the Gilmore Projects until the age of 12, a point he often stressed. His family then moved to Yosemite Ave. in West Baltimore where he resided for the duration of his childhood. Tyrone accepted Christ into his life and was baptized at an early age. He was preceded in death by his older brother, Kevin Barney and his younger sister, Patricia Freeman Chiddick.

 

Tyrone or “Ty”, as he was often referred to by friends and loved ones, graduated from Northwestern High School in Baltimore, MD in 1972. Ty continued his education at The University of Maryland, College Park, graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in Criminal Justice in 1976.

 

It was at the University of Maryland where he met his future wife, Cheryl Lynn (Hockaday), the sister of his college roommate, Eric. On February 14, 1981, Ty and Cheryl were married at New Shiloh Baptist Church and would spend the next 36 years building a family and life together. From this union three beloved children were born, Justin, Ashley and Troy. Ty was devoted to his wife and endeavored to travel the world with her. He also found his place in Cheryl’s family, who embraced him wholeheartedly. 

 

Ty began his career with the Internal Revenue Service’s Criminal Investigation Division as a co-op student. He progressed through the ranks from Criminal Investigator (CI) to several executive positions within the organization, including the Director of Investigations Southeast Region, Director of Strategy and many more. Ty received numerous awards and recognition for his service. In 2008, Ty retired from the IRS with a legacy of countless mentees, colleagues and friends. After retirement he joined the Association of Former Special Agents of the Internal Revenue Service (AFSA-IRS). However, after 32 years of working, and children still in college, Ty returned to the workforce as a Contractor for The Doyle Group, LLC until February 2016. 

An avid chef, Ty didn’t just enjoy cooking, he became a self-taught student of the craft. So much so that he didn’t allow his wife to cook, only permitting her to act as sous chef on occasion. From memories of his parents’ recipes, to the recipes and techniques of family, friends and the various online sites, Ty sought and often achieved culinary perfection. As “Chef Ty”, he became well known to those who had the pleasure of sharing his meals. A consummate host, Ty created a home filled with warmth and welcomed all who visited.

 

Ty’s love of cooking was equally matched with his love of sports, particularly football, basketball, and baseball. Being from Baltimore, it is no surprise that Ty was an Orioles and Ravens’ fan, remaining loyal to his city of birth by rooting for the home teams. Ty attended all Ravens’ home games and had the pleasure of attending Super Bowl XLVII in New Orleans with his wife.

 

To his children, Ty was everything. An advisor, confidante, teacher and hero, Ty ensured that not only were his children’s needs met but their dreams were fulfilled as well. Ty frequently spoke of the pride he felt in his children’s accomplishments, of course making sure to point out his own contributions to their success. Aside from his pride in their achievements, Ty continually conveyed to his children the love, respect and care he felt for them. It was not uncommon for Ty to spend hours speaking with his children about anything from a recent Raven’s game to the meaning of life. Ty led through example, instilling a host of values in his children, responsibility, work ethic, compassion, loyalty, trust and honesty to name a few. He constantly imparted these same values to his many nieces and nephews. When Ty welcomed his late sister’s son, Benjamin Freeman, into his home to continue his education, he treated him as he did his children. As Uncle Ty, he was not only the patriarch of the family but presented an excellent example of what a man, father and caring person should be.

 

Ty adored his granddaughter, Jasmine Marie Barney, his La Pooh. He delighted in watching her learn and explore, regularly commenting on the awe he felt in her growth. Jasmine loved him dearly, turning to her “Pop-Pop” for comfort and play, listening to the lessons he imparted and watching him prepare meals at the kitchen counter. He was anxiously awaiting the arrival of his second grandchild, Baby Boy Barney.

 

Generous, patient and engaging with a hint of sarcasm, Tyrone charmed everyone that he encountered. He acted as a mentor to not only his colleagues, but family and friends as well. Everyone in his life benefited from his presence and in turn he was surrounded by love and admiration.

 

He leaves to cherish his memory; his wife, Cheryl Barney; children, Justin Barney (Maya), Ashley Barney and Troy Barney (Jovanna); grandchildren, Jasmine Barney and Baby Boy Barney; sisters, Landa McLaurin, Valerie Barney, Andrea McFarland and Kimberly Brewton (Wendell); a brother-in-law and close friend, Eric Hockaday (Denise); aunts, in-laws, nieces, nephews, cousins and a host of friends and former colleagues.

 

CI Family,

It is with deep sadness that I inform you of the sudden passing of former IRS-CI Executive Tyrone Barney.  Ty served in many leadership roles within in CI before his retirement in 2008 after 33 years of government service.  He had a tremendous impact on many of the current leaders within the organization.    Please continue to keep Ty’s family in your thoughts and prayers during this very difficult time.

 

Below are details for the services:

 Don Fort

Viewing: 

Wylie Funeral Home, 

9200 Liberty Road, 

Randallstown, MD

Friday, January 12, 2018- 5-7

Funeral Services:

Rising Sun First Baptist Church

2212 St Luke’s Lane 

Baltimore, MD. 21207 

Saturday, January 13, 2018

             Wake:  10-11

             Services : 11

Internment immediately following services:

Arbutus Memorial Park

1101 Sulpher Spring Rd. 

Baltimore, MD 21227

Repast following internment at Rising Sun Baptist Church.

[November 06, 2017] Sad News: Passing of John Jones

 

 

It is with a heavy heart we share the news of the passing of our friend and former coworker, John Jones, after a courageous battle with cancer.  John was passionate about CI in his position as a Senior Analyst at Headquarters retiring in December 2007, and he was affectionately known as “The Original Mr. CIMIS”.

 

At John’s request, there will not be an official obituary, and flowers are gratefully declined.  Below is the  information for his CI family to honor John’s legacy:

 

  • ·       On Friday, November 17th at 11:00 a.m. a Memorial Mass will be held at St. Leo The Great Catholic Church, 3700 Old Lee Highway, Fairfax, VA 22030  followed by a service at 12:30 at Fairfax Memorial Funeral Home, 9900 Braddock Road, Fairfax, VA 22032 .  A light reception will follow at a location to be determined.  If you plan to attend, please let Cheryl Hayes know so the family can plan accordingly. 

 

  • ·        Following retirement, John’s life revolved around spending time with his grandchildren.  As a result, in lieu of flowers, the family has set up a memorial account for the continuing education of his grandchildren, Books, Bryce, Cole and Kenzie. https://www.youcaring.com/brycegaskillkenziegaskillcoledornerandbrooksdorner-996258

 

  • ·       Condolences may be sent to the family (wife, Joanne Jones, and daughters, Cristin Gaskill and Carlie Dorner) to:

Cristin Gaskill

26104 Flintonbridge Dr.

Chantilly, VA 20152

 

Please feel free to pass this information along to those who knew John!!

[November 06, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Robert C. Sawyer

[October 27, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Michael Edward Rentsch

Michael Edward Rentsch, age 63, of Ennis, Texas died on Wednesday October 18, 2017. Michael was born March 20, 1954 in Omaha, Nebraska. 

A memorial service for Michael will be held Saturday, October 28, 2017 at 2:00 PM at First Presbyterian Church of Ennis, 210 North Mckinney Street, Ennis , Texas 75119. 

[July 18, 2017] Sad News: Passing of John Patrick Lafferty

John Patrick Lafferty 74, of Quitman, TX passed away on June 25, 2017 in Tyler, TX. He was born on Friday, August 21, 1942 to the late Alfred Lafferty and Elsie Ewald Lafferty. 
John was a member of Wood County Master Gardner Club and was active with the republican party and was a Eagle Scout. John graduated Miami University in Oxford, OH and served 31 years in the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS as a Special Agent.
John is survived by his wife Sondra Lafferty of Quitman; two son's, Michael Lafferty of Quitman, Stephen Lafferty and his wife Christina of Rockwall; two daughters, Kathryn Lafferty and her husband Patrick Bhirdo of Dallas, Cynthia Herndon and her husband Brent of Carrollton; six grandchildren, Chelsea Herndon, Samantha Herndon, Sydney Lafferty, Joshua Lafferty, Jacob Lafferty, Madeline Bhirdo.
Visitation will be on Thursday, June 29, 2017 from 6-8 pm at Beaty Funeral Home in Mineola. Funeral service will be on Friday, June 30, 2017 at 10:00 am at Beaty Funeral Home in Mineola officiated by Rev. Charles Long. Burial will follow at Roselawn Memorial Gardens in Mineola

[July 11, 2017] Sad News: Passing of George Allen Kelt

George Allen Kelt Jr. was born June 30, 1935, at the Valley Farm in Navarro County, TX, to George and Elizabeth Braswell Kelt. He was the second of four children. 
He graduated from San Jacinto High School in Houston; Texas A&M with an Accounting degree and Bates College of Law at the University of Houston.
He served in the U.S. Air Force, was an accountant for Shell Pipeline in Wyoming, a special agent for the Intelligence Division of the Internal Revenue Service and as an Assistant U.S. Attorney at the time of his retirement in 2000. He also served as a U.S. Magistrate Judge for eight years in the Southern District of Texas.
A lifelong Christian, George has been a loyal member of Baptist and Methodist churches and has been a member of Lovers Lane United Methodist Church for 12 years.
George was preceded in death by his parents and sisters Benadene Fairfield and Carol Nelson. He is survived by his wife Clara, step-daughter and husband Allison and Fernando Salazar of Murphy, Texas, grandchildren, Daniel and Ruth Salazar, sister Patricia Rosenfeld of Houston, brothers-in-law Ray John and LeRoy of San Antonio, Texas, and Bobby Nelson and Mary Jane of Huntsville, Texas, and several nieces and nephews.
Burial will be for near family members at Chatfield Cemetery.

[May 02, 2017] IRS-CI HEAD WEBER TO STEP DOWN, LEAVING PROUD LEGACY BUT UNCERTAIN FUTURE FOR AGENCY

[May 01, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Jerry Lee Stamps

Jerry Lee Stamps LUBBOCK-Jerry Lee Stamps was born on Oct. 23, 1936, to Roy and Leola Stamps in Childress, Texas. Jerry went to be with his Lord and Savior on Sunday, April 23, 2017. He graduated from Plainview High School in 1955. He served in the Air Force from 1956-1959. He attended Texas Tech and graduated with a BBA in Accounting in 1962. He married Nancy Winford on June 11, 1963. He was a CPA and retired from the IRS in 1987. After retirement, he worked independently and enjoyed traveling, square dancing, RVing, hunting, fishing and spending time with his family. He was a member of First Christian Church where he served as an elder. Survivors include his wife, Nancy; daughters, Vicki Ward and Cynthia Stamps; grandchildren, Derek, Devin, Dustin, and Denae Ward; C.J. and Claire Mroczkowski; one great-granddaughter, Aria Ward; and brother, Doyle Stamps and wife, Dorothlyn. We will gather for fellowship and remembrance from 6 to 8 p.m. today, April 25, 2017, at Lake Ridge Chapel and Memorial Designers. Family and friends will gather to celebrate his life of 80 years on Wednesday, April 26, 2017, at 10:30 a.m. at First Christian Church. A tribute of Jerry's life may be found at www.memorialdesigners.net, where you may leave memories and expressions of sympathy for his family. In lieu of flowers the family suggests memorials to The American Cancer Society - See more at: file:///Users/maryruiz/Downloads/Jerry Stamps Obituary - Lubbock, TX _ Lubbock Avalanche-Journal.html#sthash.Y0zKObxD.dpuf

[May 01, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Norman Edward "Ed" Calhoun

Norman Edward "Ed" Calhoun, 71

APRIL 13, 1946-APRIL 21, 2017

  • ·         Apr 22, 2017 Updated Apr 22, 2017
  • ·          
  • ·         Norman Edward "Ed" Calhoun went to his eternal life with Christ on Friday, April 21, 2017, after living a beautiful and rich life on Earth.

He was born in Lewistown, Pa., on April 13, 1946, to Blair Robert and Clara Valerie "Dot" Calhoun.

Ed is survived by his wife of 26 years, Cindy Calhoun (Zawalish); his two children and four grandsons, son, Bryan Calhoun, daughter-in-law, Heidi, and grandsons, Grant and Adam, of Bethel Park, Pa.; and daughter, Beth Hoffman (Calhoun), son-in-law, Andrew Hoffman, and grandsons, Drew and Michael, of Hagerstown, Md. He also is survived by his brother, Andrew Calhoun and his wife, Kathy, of Enola, Pa.

After serving in the U.S. Navy, Ed graduated from the University of Pittsburgh with a degree in criminal justice.

He began his career as a deputy U.S. marshal in Harrisburg, Pa. He transferred to the Criminal Investigation Division of the Internal Revenue Service, where he retired after 30 years of service. He loved being a special agent and firearms instructor.

He had many interests in his wonderful life, including firefighting, train and RV travel, scuba diving, photography, Scouting and elongated penny machines.

He continued his dad's work at the Lewistown, Pa., train station by serving as the project manager for the installation of a fire- suppression system.

Ed also was a Mason and Shriner. He was past master of Lodge 91 in Shepherdstown, W.Va. He worked with the Philadelphia Shriners Hospital as a transporter.

He was involved in the fire service for more than 40 years. He instructed at the Pennsylvania Fire Academy, and had been the fire chief of the Broughton Volunteer Fire Department and a long-term member of the Needmore (Pa.) Fire Department.

He will be missed greatly by those whose lives he touched. Let us remember that we need not mourn when great men as these are lost, but rather celebrate that they had lived among us.

The family will receive friends Monday, April 24, 2017, from 2 to 4 p.m. and 6 to 8 p.m. at Brown Funeral Homes' South Berkeley Chapel, Inwood, W.Va.

The funeral service will be Tuesday, April 25, 2017, at 11 a.m. at the chapel. Interment will be private.

In lieu of flowers, memorial donations may be made to Shriners Hospitals for Children, 3551 N. Broad St., Philadelphia, PA 19140-4131.

Online condolences may be offered at www.brownfuneralhomeswv.com.

[May 01, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Robert W. "Steamboat" Jones

Obituary for Robert W. "Steamboat" Jones, (CDR, USN, Ret.)
Robert W. "Steamboat" Jones (CDR, USN, Ret.), age 83, of Alexandria, VA, passed away on November 29, 2016. Beloved father of Robert F. Jones and wife Oksana; Lynn Jones Darmetko; and Brian D. Jones and wife Jenni. Cherished grandfather of Jeffrey Darmetko and wife Lisa; Amy Keighley; Emily Dent and husband David; Heather Jones; and Nicole Jones. Great grandfather of Colleen Keighley, Connor Keighley, and Anthony Darmetko. Dear brother of Carol Satkus and husband Jerry; and Allen Jones and wife Elaine. Also survived by numerous nieces and nephews. Robert was predeceased by his parents, Albert and Ethel Jones, as well as his siblings Doris Long, Albert "Bucky" Jones, and Norman Jones.

Robert proudly served our country for almost 30 years in the United States Navy, where he retired as Commander. He later worked as a special agent for the United States Treasury Department. He had a love for his family, especially his grandchildren, who referred to him as "Grampy" and "Grampy Yo." His passion for boating and the water never left him after retirement from the Navy. He enjoyed all types of boating, and was a member of the Capital Yacht Club and Old Dominion Yacht Club.

The family will receive friends at the Mountcastle Turch Funeral Home, 4143 Dale Boulevard, Dale City, VA 22193 on Friday, December 16, 2016 from 1 p.m. until the time of his Life Celebration at 3 p.m., with reception to follow at the National Museum of the Marine Corps, Triangle, VA. Internment with Full Navy Honors will be in Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.

[April 17, 2017] Departure of Chief Richard Weber

Criminal Investigation 

Announces the Departure of

CHIEF RICHARD WEBER

Please join us on Wednesday, May 24, 2017 in the Main IRS lobby/atrium from 1 - 3 pm as we celebrate his five years of dedicated leadership.

 

contact Cheryl Hayes at

[January 27, 2017] Sad News: Passing of Michael Dreiblatt

Obituary for Michael Dreiblatt

Michael Dreiblatt, 71, of Valencia Isles in Boynton Beach, Florida passed away suddenly on Saturday January 21, 2017. Michael was very involved with his Valencia Isles community serving as a member and Past President of their Board of Directors.

 

He was a US Navy Veteran and a graduate of the New York Institute of Technology, graduating in 1970 with a B.S. is Business Administration. Michael worked in the Criminal Investigation Division of the the Internal Revenue Service in New York and Connecticut, retiring in 1995 as the Chief/Special Agent in Charge of the Hartford office directing activities in both Connecticut and Rhode Island. There he led a team of 53 agents, 5 Group Managers, an Assistant Chief, and a clerical staff of 14. After retiring in 1995. Michael continued as an Investigative Consultant in the private sector. He was a Certified Fraud Examiner, held a Private Investigators License in Florida, and was a member of the Association of Retired IRS Special Agents. He was often called upon to serve as an expert witness in legal proceedings.

 

Michael is survived by his beloved family; Anita, his loving wife of 47 years; his devoted children Jessica (John) Dittami and Lainie (Bryan) Kemp; 4 cherished grandchildren, Joanna, Joshua, Camryn and Robbie; a dear sister Barbara (Rich) Seidenberg; and his mother-in-law Mildred Eiferman, whom he thought of as a mother.

 

Chapel services will be held at 1PM on Tuesday January 24, 2017 at Beth Israel Memorial Chapel, 11115 Jog Rd., Boynton Beach, Florida 33437 followed by entombment with Navy Honors at Eternal Light Memorial Gardens in Boynton Beach. Those wishing to honor Michael with a memorial contribution are asked to kindly consider the Valencia Isles Chapter of the PAP Corps.

 

[January 03, 2017] Sad News: Passing of B. Alan Wells

 

 

B. ALAN WELLS

 

1948 - December 13, 2016

 

B. Alan Wells, resident of Georgetown, Texas passed away December 13, 2016. He was born in Austin, Texas in 1948 to Jack and Cecelia "Pansy" Wells. He had one brother, David Wells. Alan graduated from McCallum High School in 1966 where he lettered in football and baseball. He went on to attend Texas Lutheran College 1966-1971, graduating with a Bachelor's Degree in Business Administration. One of his proudest accomplishments was to be a two-sport All American in football and baseball and in the TLC Hall of Fame. He was also a member of Kappa Pi Alpha fraternity. After college he was signed by the Kansas City Royals Organization continuing in his love of baseball. After his time in baseball, he married Patty Spencer in Austin, TX. They moved to the Ft. Worth Area where he accepted a Revenue Officer position with the Internal Revenue Service and this was where his daughter, Shannon, was born. He advanced within his career to be a Special Agent in the U.S. Treasury Department. He later advanced to Chief of U.S. Treasury Department, supervising Special Agents in Shreveport, LA and Sacramento, CA. It was in Sacramento, CA where Alan met his wife, Kathy. They shared a love for golf, traveling and mostly being with family and friends, whom he considered as close as family. He later opened his own Investigation firm, Wells & Nielsen and was a partner in that firm for 32 years, focusing on white collar fraud. Alan and Kathy resided in Mission Viejo until Kathy's passing, after over 30 years of marriage. He then moved back to his home state of Texas to be closer to his mother and brother. He was visiting Shannon and her family in Santa Barbara when he was diagnosed and suddenly passed away with late-stage lung cancer. He was preceded in death by his wife Kathy, his father Jack Wells, and his mother Cecilia "Pansy" Wells. He is survived by his brother, David Wells and sister-in-law, Karen Wells of Covington TX; by his daughter, Shannon Montanaro and son-in-law, Jon Montanaro and his granddaughter, Alexis of Santa Barbara, CA; and by his step-daughter, Shannon Smith of Ventura, CA. He is also survived by his beloved dog Peanut who brought immense happiness to Alan, Kathy and his mother's lives. He is now reunited with Kathy, the love of his life, as well as his parents. A memorial service will be held after the New Year in Orange County, CA.

 

 

 

[January 03, 2017] Sad News: Passing of William B. Smith

Smith, William "Bill" William "Bill" Bruce Smith, age 63, of Grand Rapids, went home to

be with his Lord after a courageous battle with cancer on Monday, December 19, 2016.

Bill was preceded in death by his parents, Mary Ann and Charles Smith; and by his sisters, Karen and Penny. Bill leaves behind and will be deeply missed by his wife, Margaret; his children, William Smith, Michael (Beth) Morris; Shawna (Paul) Magee; grandson, Paul Magee; nephew, Sean Eyrich; brothers-in-law and sisters-in-law, Peter (Alicia) Stipek, Thomas (Cindy) Stipek, Carol (John) Foreman; and two grand-puppies, Hanna and Ari. Bill proudly served his country as a Sergeant in the US Marine Corps during the Vietnam War and retired from the US Department of Treasury as a Special Agent for the IRS in 2008. Bill's family will greet friends and relatives on Thursday, December 22, from 1-3 & 6-8 pm during a visitation at Zaagman Memorial Chapel (2800 Burton St. SE). A formal funeral service will not be held, but a private family interment will occur at a later date. If one wishes, please consider making a memorial donation, in lieu of flowers, to Faith Hospice (2100 Raybrook St. SE, Suite 300, Grand Rapids, Michigan 49546).

[December 07, 2016] Sad News Passing of James (Jim) A. Barrett

 

James Augustus Barrett

 

October 22, 1926

 

September 16, 2016

 

James A. Barrett Sr. (Jim Barrett) passed away peacefully holding his wife Cathie's hand in Las Vegas, NV. He was 89 years-old. Jim was born on October 22, 1926 in Washington, D.C. were he spent his youth delivering newspapers, helping neighbors home from the grocery store in the mornings with his wagon and working for small tips so he could make it to the Saturday afternoon matinees.

 

In August of 1944 before graduating high school Jim joined the United States Navy to serve his country during World War II. He completed his basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Station in North Chicago, Ill. and served on a minesweeper in the South Pacific as a Chief Petty Officer. Shortly before Jim's discharged from the Navy, on June 6, 1946, he was informed he would receive his high school diploma from Roosevelt High School due to his good grades, positive reputation before joining the Navy and his service to his country. Jim graduated from George Washington University.

 

On New Year's Eve 1946 "Jim & Cathie" met while attending a mutual friend's party. They immediately started dating and married on September 11, 1948. Jim & Cathie valued the sacrament of marriage beyond measure and found sweet, simple ways to express their love and gratitude every day. Throughout their 68 years of marriage Jim & Cathie created a family of ten children, 26 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren and four great, great grandchildren.

 

As a Special Agent for the United States Internal Revenue Service, Jim & Cathie worked their way down the east coast living in Wilmington, North Carolina, Asheville, North Carolina and North Miami Beach, Florida.

 

While working with the IRS in North Miami Beach, Jim experienced several high-level assignments including: Secret Service detail for visiting President Richard Nixon, heading cases involving organized crime, as well as money laundering. Before leaving North Miami Beach, Jim left his government position and moved into the private sector to serve as Vice President of two gaming casinos on the island of Bahama in the city of Nassau for Intercontinental Gaming Corporation. During his time in the Bahamas Jim & Cathie welcomed many dignitaries to the Island including a visit from Queen Elizabeth II.

 

In June 1972, Jim looked west for new insight and adventure and accepted a management position with Intercontinental to head their Keno Manufacturing division in Sparks, NV.

 

When Jim's position ended with Intercontinental Jim & Cathie decided to provide the small community of South Reno with a home furnishings and hardware store affectionately named, Granny's General Store. Granny's was located in the Del Monte Shopping Center and provided customers the opportunity to mail a letter, pick up a bag of nails, purchase fine unfinished furnishings, homemade fudge even a nice long black licorice whip.

 

It was a call in May 1975 from Nevada Governor Michael O'Callaghan that enticed Jim to return to public service where he served as the Director, Department of Crime, Corrections and Delinquency and Director of the Nevada Crime Commission until 1980.

 

For the next 13 years, Jim went on to share his extensive management and accounting experience with the Associated Builders & Contractors, The Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club as its first Executive Director as well as develop a coal cleaning operation located in Southern Indiana until deciding to formally retire in 1993.

 

In 2003, Jim & Cathie decided to trade in their over-sized ranch house in Southwest Reno for retirement in Las Vegas, NV where he and Cathie enjoyed a carefree, beautiful home and life style.

 

Jim was man of strong character, faith and love. He is survived by his brothers Paul and Raymond, his beloved wife Cathie, children Jay (Laura), Marybeth King (Bill), Patrick (Rebecca), Eileen Kahler (Scott), Chris (Barbara), Martin (Kathie), Vince (Beth), Greg (Kellie), and Catherine Gardella (Kyle), his 26 grandchildren, 14 great grandchildren and four great, great grandchildren.

 

He is preceded in death by his parents William & Margret Barrett, his brother Bill, son Michael and grandson Kevin.

 

In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club.

 

 

James Augustus Barrett

 

October 22, 1926

 

September 16, 2016

 

James A. Barrett Sr. (Jim Barrett) passed away peacefully holding his wife Cathie's hand in Las Vegas, NV. He was 89 years-old. Jim was born on October 22, 1926 in Washington, D.C. were he spent his youth delivering newspapers, helping neighbors home from the grocery store in the mornings with his wagon and working for small tips so he could make it to the Saturday afternoon matinees.

 

In August of 1944 before graduating high school Jim joined the United States Navy to serve his country during World War II. He completed his basic training at the Great Lakes Naval Station in North Chicago, Ill. and served on a minesweeper in the South Pacific as a Chief Petty Officer. Shortly before Jim's discharged from the Navy, on June 6, 1946, he was informed he would receive his high school diploma from Roosevelt High School due to his good grades, positive reputation before joining the Navy and his service to his country. Jim graduated from George Washington University.

 

On New Year's Eve 1946 "Jim & Cathie" met while attending a mutual friend's party. They immediately started dating and married on September 11, 1948. Jim & Cathie valued the sacrament of marriage beyond measure and found sweet, simple ways to express their love and gratitude every day. Throughout their 68 years of marriage Jim & Cathie created a family of ten children, 26 grandchildren and 14 great grandchildren and four great, great grandchildren.

 

As a Special Agent for the United States Internal Revenue Service, Jim & Cathie worked their way down the east coast living in Wilmington, North Carolina, Asheville, North Carolina and North Miami Beach, Florida.

 

While working with the IRS in North Miami Beach, Jim experienced several high-level assignments including: Secret Service detail for visiting President Richard Nixon, heading cases involving organized crime, as well as money laundering. Before leaving North Miami Beach, Jim left his government position and moved into the private sector to serve as Vice President of two gaming casinos on the island of Bahama in the city of Nassau for Intercontinental Gaming Corporation. During his time in the Bahamas Jim & Cathie welcomed many dignitaries to the Island including a visit from Queen Elizabeth II.

 

In June 1972, Jim looked west for new insight and adventure and accepted a management position with Intercontinental to head their Keno Manufacturing division in Sparks, NV.

 

When Jim's position ended with Intercontinental Jim & Cathie decided to provide the small community of South Reno with a home furnishings and hardware store affectionately named, Granny's General Store. Granny's was located in the Del Monte Shopping Center and provided customers the opportunity to mail a letter, pick up a bag of nails, purchase fine unfinished furnishings, homemade fudge even a nice long black licorice whip.

 

It was a call in May 1975 from Nevada Governor Michael O'Callaghan that enticed Jim to return to public service where he served as the Director, Department of Crime, Corrections and Delinquency and Director of the Nevada Crime Commission until 1980.

 

For the next 13 years, Jim went on to share his extensive management and accounting experience with the Associated Builders & Contractors, The Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club as its first Executive Director as well as develop a coal cleaning operation located in Southern Indiana until deciding to formally retire in 1993.

 

In 2003, Jim & Cathie decided to trade in their over-sized ranch house in Southwest Reno for retirement in Las Vegas, NV where he and Cathie enjoyed a carefree, beautiful home and life style.

 

Jim was man of strong character, faith and love. He is survived by his brothers Paul and Raymond, his beloved wife Cathie, children Jay (Laura), Marybeth King (Bill), Patrick (Rebecca), Eileen Kahler (Scott), Chris (Barbara), Martin (Kathie), Vince (Beth), Greg (Kellie), and Catherine Gardella (Kyle), his 26 grandchildren, 14 great grandchildren and four great, great grandchildren.

 

He is preceded in death by his parents William & Margret Barrett, his brother Bill, son Michael and grandson Kevin.

 

In lieu of flowers, please make a donation to the Truckee Meadows Boys & Girls Club.

 

 

 

 

 

 

[November 22, 2016] Sad News: Passing of William Witkowski

William E. Witkowski beloved husband of Carole; loving father of John (Noreen) and Robert (Christine); dearest grandfather of James, Allison, and Johnathon; dear brother of the late Richard; also many fond nieces and nephews. William was a Special Agent for the U.S. Treasury Department, Criminal Investigation Division for 28 years. Memorial visitation Friday November 25 from 3 PM - 9 PM with a funeral service at 7 PM at the Schielka Addison Street Funeral Home 7710 W Addison St. 773-625-3444

 

Published in a Chicago Tribune Media Group Publication from Nov. 18 to Nov. 22, 2016

- See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/chicagotribune/obituary.aspx?n=william-witkowski&pid=182592064#sthash.0jpGKwWY.dpuf

[October 23, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Michael McDonald

Michael McDonald Obituary

 

We are saddened to report that former Special Agent/Group Supervisor Michael McDonald has passed away Thursday evening (10/20) as a result of complications relating to his battle with melanoma.  Mike retired in 1998 from a legendary career with CI in Miami. Mike was an architect of Operation Greenback, the incredibly successful anti-money laundering initiative employed by IRS to find and seize drug proceeds. Interviews with Mike about the cocaine cartels are still frequently aired on the National Geographic Channel as well as in other documentaries aired on other channels.   After retiring, Mike became a highly successful consultant. Michael McDonald & Associates Inc. was highly sought after by banks and money service businesses in the U.S. and abroad to evaluate their anti-money laundering programs and to improve their effectiveness. Mike was a friend to many and an enemy to none (with the exception of several individuals from south of the border). Throughout his battle with melanoma, Mike never asked for, or wanted sympathy. He viewed his diagnosis as a challenge, which he intended to win right up to the end. Mike cherished his wife Melanie, his daughter Carrie his son Ryan (Kara) and his five year old grandson, Michael. Throughout his demanding career, Mike always found a way to put his family first.

 

Plans for a memorial service are incomplete. Expressions of sympathy may be sent to:

 

Michael McDonald & Associates

11924 W Forest Hill, #10A-300

Wellington, FL 33414

 

[September 27, 2016] Retired SA Bozeman - battling cancer

Retired SA Tom Bozeman (Fayetteville, NC POD) has been battling cancer and other health issues for some time. I just learned he’s in the hospital (Chapel Hill, NC) again and not doing well. He’s been there for about a week or so.  They are not sure when or if he’ll go home again.  Please keep Tom, his wife Kim, and their family in your thoughts and prayers.  Feel free to pass this along to retirees or others you think may know Tom or would like to know about his status.  Tom’s home address and phone number are shown below.  Thanks and be safe!   

 

7705 Eunice Drive

Fayetteville, NC 28306

 

Cell:     910-988-9152

[September 22, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Laura Wood Murray

Last week Russ Murray's wife of 73 years was called to the Lord.  Russ who is in his 90's  retired from CID many years ago.  He was a member of the AFSA-IRS for many years and up until his and Laura's health started failing attended many of the conventions. 

 

Mr. Miles spoke with Russ and needless to say he is saddened with a very heavy heart.  He is accepting phone calls.   

His  address is:                                                                                        

Russell W. Murray

14 Cheshire Glen Lane

The Woodlands, TX 77382

Tel No. 713-825-6063

 

In Memory of

Laura Wood Murray

July 2, 1925 - September 6, 2016

Laura Wood Murray, 91, of The Woodlands passed away on Tuesday, September 6,

2016. Laura was born and spent her childhood in Burlington, North Carolina. Laura and

Russ married on March 16, 1943, in Danville, Virginia. Laura, Russ and their

daughters spent many happy years together in Charlotte, North Carolina, Macon,

Georgia, and Atlanta, Georgia before Laura and Russ moved to Houston in January

1978.

Cherishing her memory are her husband, Russell W. Murray; sister, Polly Wilson;

daughters, Pamela M. Wright and her husband, Taylor; Laura Janette "Jan" Pilzer and

her husband, Ted; granddaughters, Bailey C. O'Leary and her husband, Brendan, and

Natalie H. Pilzer; grandsons, Dylan T. Wright and Matthew L. Pilzer; and her greatgrandson,

Aidan W. O'Leary.

Laura was a faithful member and volunteer for the Presbyterian church throughout her

life. The church, Russ, and her family were the center of her life. Her family and

friends enjoyed Laura's sense of humor; she loved to laugh. She enjoyed playing

bridge with her friends and Skip Bo with her grandkids. Laura also loved to read and

travel to Mo Ranch, where she arranged trips for seniors at her church. She spent

time teaching Body Recall classes to seniors also.

We are blessed to have had her with us. We love her greatly and will miss her

immeasurably.

 

[September 13, 2016] Wild game Cook-off Grand Champions!!!!

On September 9-10, 2016, “The Untouchable Hogs” Cooking Team participated in the Texas Association of First Responders (TAFR) Annual Law Enforcement, Fire Fighters and EMS Charity Wild Game Cook-Off, an event sanctioned by the Lone Star Barbecue Society.

The team consists of local, state and federal law enforcement agencies comprising the Houston Money Laundering Initiative, which is part of the Houston High Intensity Drug Trafficking Area (HIDTA) Task Force.  This was The Untouchable Hogs’ thirteenth year competing in this very special event that brings together first responder personnel from around the state of Texas in order to raise money to assist law enforcement officers, firefighters and EMS personnel injured in the line of duty.  All proceeds from the event benefit TAFR’s charitable activities.

This year’s cook-off, held at the Pasadena Municipal Fairgrounds in Pasadena, was again a huge success!  This year there were 85 cooking teams who participated in this event.  The Untouchable Hogs Cooking Team won over all Grand Champion (see attached).  They won a total of ten trophies including Grand Champion, 4th place Brisket, 1st and 5th place Ribs, 7th and 8th place Chicken, 5th and 7th place Seafood and 7th and 8th place Wild Game.  They also make it to the final table with 11th place Chicken and 18th place Brisket. Everyone had a great time.  Although this year will be hard to beat next year, we are looking forward to it.

The Untouchable Hogs Cooking Team wants to thank everyone for all of your contributions, your support for this year and the years to come.  A very special thanks to Mark and Mary Hammond, Anthony Rogers, Arnita Jackson, Bessilynn Spikes, Blake Bowen, Karen Nichols, Logan McCarthy, Sylvia Garza, Terri Hogan, Beth Wigginton, Edward Gonzales, Monica and Royce Click, and Roberta Laurel.

 

[August 05, 2016] AFSA-IRS Cruise 2017

 

AFSA Cruise 2017

The Enchanting Rhine June 29 – July 6, 2017

7 night cruise from Amsterdam to Basel

 

June 29 – Amsterdam

July 1 – Cologne & Koblenz

July 2 – Rhine Gorge & Rudesheim

Jul7 3 – Mannheim

July 4 – Strasbourg

July 5 – Breisach & Basel

July 6 Disembarkation

 

BOOK BY SEPTEMBER 30, 2016 AND SAVE ,000 PER PERSON ON CRUISE FARE

 

 

[August 03, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Colonel Judy (Judith) Welker

Colonel Judy (Judith) Welker, passed away at her home in Carlsbad, CA from head and neck cancer on July 12, 2016. Judy was born in Iowa on November 8, 1944 and was raised in Shelby, Montana by her parents Howard and Genny (Genevieve) Welker. After high school she attended Kinman Business College for a year and received a degree in Sociology from Montana State University. She was commissioned in the Army as a 2nd Lieutenant and retired as a Colonel in the Army Reserves after 35years. Judy was a graduate of the Army War College, an expert in Psychological Operations, and received the top award from the Selective Service System. Judy attended San Diego State University (SDSU), pursuing an MBA in Accounting and Finance. She was a member of the Accounting Honorary, Beta Alpha Psi, and taught accounting at SDSU. Judy passed the CPA exam and worked as an auditor and tax accountant, eventually becoming an IRS Special Agent (criminal investigator), primarily investigating money laundering in conjunction with narcotics and export violations. After 7 years, Judy transferred to US Customs Service as a Special Agent. She obtained a Masters Degree in Management from Salve Regina University and became a member of MENSA. Transferring to Washington, DC as a Senior Special Agent, she worked at the Financial Crimes Enforcement Network (FinCEN) and the U.S. Customs Headquarters, where she became the Area Director for Asian Operations, and ultimately, the national coordinator of narcotic undercover investigations. Judy retired in San Diego, CA as a Supervisor in charge of exports of high technology and military munitions. At retirement, she received the Albert Gallatin award, the highest award given to an individual by the Treasury Department. After retiring, she became an avid golfer and won the club champion 6 times at Lake San Marcos Country Club now known as St. Mark Golf Club. In May 2015 she shared the club championship at the Lake San Marcos Executive Course, which was the last time she got to play the game she loved so much. Throughout her life, Judy had continuing faith in Christ. Judy is survived by her brother, Jim and his wife, Claudia and their children and grandchildren who live in Colorado. She has a large extended family and was very close to her aunts, uncles, and many cousins all over the country with the majority residing in Montana. Services will be held at the Whitted Funeral Home in Shelby, MT on July 29th at 10:30 am. After the service there will be a grave side service at the Mountain View Cemetery and lunch at the Methodist Church for family and friends.

[June 20, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Richard H. Neier

Richard Neier Obituary - anaconda, Montana

 

Richard was born on January 24, 1955 and passed away on Friday, May 27, 2016.

[February 29, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Sheridan Cleo Morris, Jr.

[January 19, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Robert (Bob) E. Burgess

 

Retired Special Agent Robert (Bob) E. Burgess, of Virginia Beach, VA, passed away unexpectedly on Saturday, January 16, 2016. Bob retired from IRS-CI on January 3, 2003 but continued to provide his considerable skill and expertise in his post retirement job with the Peninsula Narcotics Enforcement Task Force (PNETF) until his passing. Bob generously shared his extensive knowledge in conducting complex criminal financial investigations with everyone he worked with from IRS-CI SA’s to other federal, state and local law enforcement personnel including the various U.S. Attorney’s offices that he worked with. He was beloved by all who knew and worked with him. His passing is deeply felt by his friends and colleagues that he worked with in the Hampton Roads, VA law enforcement community. Bob was a devoted family man and leaves behind his wife Barbara, three sons Randy, Carter and Chris Burgess and one grandson, Callan, and families, and Bob’s four brother’s and their families. See attached obituary and information about services for Bob. Please keep Bob’s wife, Barbara, and his entire family in your thoughts and prayers. 

 

Expressions of sympathy can be sent to Barbara Burgess at 1221 Worthington Lane, Virginia Beach, VA 23464. 

 

The family will receive friends on Wednesday January 20, 2016 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM at the Laskin Road chapel of H.D. Oliver Funeral Apts located at 2002 Laskin Road, Virginia Beach, VA 23454. The funeral service will be held at 11:00 AM, Thursday, January 21, 2016 at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, located at 5181 Singleton Way, Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462 with the Reverend Mary C. Lacy officiating. A reception at the church social hall will follow the funeral service. A private family interment will take place at a later date. Memorial donations may be made in Bob's memory to Emanuel Episcopal Church, 5181 Singleton Way, Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462. Online condolences may be sent to the family at hdoliver.com.   http://obit.hdoliver.com/obit_display.cgi?id=1581714

 

 

 

Robert E. Burgess, 67, died unexpectedly Saturday, January 16, 2016. He was a native of Franklin, Virginia and lived in Hampton Roads most of his life. He was the son of the late Chester W. Burgess, Jr. and Mildred Pfeiffer Burgess.

Bob graduated from Franklin High School and Virginia Commonwealth University, class of 1970, with a degree in Business Administration. He was a long time member of Emanuel Episcopal Church, VA Beach. He retired from the Department of Treasury, Internal Revenue Service as a Criminal Investigator after 30 years of service. Following his retirement he worked for a combined task force of the police departments of Newport News, Hampton and Poquoson.

Survivors include his loving wife of 38 years, Barbara Brittan Burgess of Virginia Beach and his sons; Robert Andrew "Randy" Burgess of Key Largo, Florida, Robert Carter "Carter" Burgess and his wife Antoinette "Annie" of Neptune Beach, Florida and Christopher Sims "Chris" Burgess and his significant other Sunyoung Yi "Sunny" both of Virginia Beach. He is also survived by his brothers; Chester W. Burgess III and his wife Jeanie of Chesapeake, William J. Burgess and his wife Ann of Franklin, Dennis D. Burgess and his wife Emily of Richmond and Benny Burgess and his wife Elizabeth of Franklin and his grandson, Callan Carter "Callan" Burgess and many nieces and nephews.

His family was very important to him and those who were not family were treated as such. Bob was a caring loving man who lived his Christian Values every day.

The family will receive friends Wednesday, January 20, 2016 from 7:00 PM to 9:00 PM in the Laskin Road chapel of H.D. Oliver Funeral Apts. The funeral service will be held at 11:00 AM, Thursday, January 21, 2016 at Emmanuel Episcopal Church, Virginia Beach, Virginia with the Reverend Mary C. Lacy officiating. A reception at the church social hall will follow the funeral service.

A private family interment will take place at a later date.

Memorial donations may be made in Bob's memory to Emanuel Episcopal Church, 5181 Singleton Way, Virginia Beach, Virginia 23462. Online condolences may be sent to the family at hdoliver.com

 

 

[January 19, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Steve Hironaka

Steve HIRONAKA passed away January 17, 2016, after a brief battle with cancer the last few months.  At his request, his family will have a private service and burial on Oahu”

[January 06, 2016] Sad News: Passing of Tim Kunsman

 

Condolences to Tim Kunsman’s family may be sent to Donna Kunsman & family at:

 

1026 Cavan Drive

Apopka, FL 32703

 

 

The funeral arrangements for Tim Kunsman have been scheduled for Friday, January 8, 2015 at 10:00 AM. 

 

Service is at:

 

Mosaic Church

608 W Oakland

Oakland, Florida

http://thisismosaic.org/location/oakland/

 

Followed by a procession to the graveside, for a service at the cemetery.

 

Woodlawn Memorial Park

400 Woodlawn Cemetery Road

Gotha, Florida

 Tampa FO received a very nice tribute to Tim from the Charlotte FO, where Tim served as the Charlotte FO’s UPM:

 

Charlotte FO personnel are extremely saddened by Tim’s passing. He was our UPM a couple years back and I can’t tell you how beneficial it was to have him in that capacity. I only spoke with him over the phone and unfortunately never met him in person; however, he was always – always at a high level of excitement and had a great tenacity and knowledge for the job. We were successful and enjoyed this success because of his efforts. He treated every case like it was his own. I wish I knew him better because providing his work product is nowhere near the overall person he was.

 

[October 07, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Rick Schmidt

 

After a valiant fight against pancreatic cancer, Rick Schmidt passed away on October 1st, 2015. Like every other challenge he encountered, he gave it hell.  You knew him as a special agent; a defining part of his personality, joy and legacy. In addition to following his beloved Chicago Bears, Rick spent his post-retirement years as a Texas rancher, die-hard Longhorn fan and contractor analyst for DEA. To all of his colleagues, we thank you for contributing to his passion for life and law enforcement. His happiest and most proud memories involved breaking down doors and drinking beers with the CID family.  Here's to one heck of a Director of Investigations, Special Agent in Charge, mentor, father, husband and friend. 

 

He will be missed by his wife Kara and his loving daughters Christine, Jennifer, Kimberly, Ann and Laura.  Memorial contributions may be made to the Lustgarten Foundation or the ASPCA.  Notes of condolence should be sent to Kara Schmidt, P.O. Box 753, Georgetown, Texas 78627.

[October 01, 2015] 3rd Annual Randy Gregory Softball Tourney Flyer - Oct 3, 2015

Hi all – our sincerest apologies, but we won’t be holding the softball tournament on Saturday, October 3rd.   Despite Randy’s strong desire to see everyone, he’s not feeling up for the long trip/layover from San Diego.  In addition to the long flight, the damp weather would be detrimental to his health.  And then there’s Hurricane Joaquin…..who is wreaking havoc with the weather, the softball fields, and everything else. 

 

We’ll track & donate the money we’ve received to date (& going forward) to Randy.  However, if you’d like all or part of your donation returned, please contact Kathy or me (whichever one you donated to), and we’ll return it. 

 

We’ve not yet come up with a plan B, but we’ll talk to Randy & Patti and keep you posted for future events. 

 

Patti & Randy wanted us to thank all of you for your continuing help in fighting  ALS, your ongoing prayers and support, and your generous donations. 

 

Thanks

 

Laurie A. Bender

Sr. Special Investigator

Dept. of Justice - Criminal Division 

             Asset Forfeiture Money Laundering Section

[September 16, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Tiberino-Ernest

[September 15, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Jose Ismael Marrero

In Memory of

Jose Ismael Marrero

 

February 20, 1954 - August 20, 2015

Obituary

 

On the morning of August 20, 2015, José Ismael "Tito" Marrero, 61, of Pompano Beach died after a years-long battle with cancer. He spent his final days at home, as he spent his life, surrounded by family. Born February 20, 1954, in Utuado, Puerto Rico to Carlos Manuel Marrero and Alba Luz Malaret, José is survived by the love of his life, his wife Virginia Marrero Cortés, his son José Miguel and wife Alexa, his daughter Dee-Ana and husband Nick, his granddaughter Addison, both his parents, his brother Carlos, his sisters Alba and Lillian, and a community of friends and family that stretches across continents and reflects José's profound influence on all those whose lives he touched.

 

José attended the University of Arizona and the University of Texas at El Paso in the early 1970s before earning his BBA from InterAmerican University in Hato Rey, Puerto Rico.

 

In 1975 José began his Internal Revenue Service career as a taxpayer service representative in Puerto Rico. He became a revenue agent in New Orleans in 1977, and became a special agent in 1979. He held positions of increasing responsibility as group manager in Cheyenne, Wyoming, and Denver, Colorado; senior regional analyst in Dallas, Texas; and Chief, Criminal Investigation Division in Jackson, Mississippi, St. Paul, Minnesota and Plantation, Florida. In April 2003, José was selected as the Deputy Director of Strategy at Headquarters in Washington, DC. José retired from government service on May 1, 2004, after 30 years with the IRS.

 

During his tenure with the IRS, José became the highest-ranking Hispanic in Criminal Investigation (Chief/SAIC) after his appointment as Chief in Jackson, Mississippi in October 1989 as well as the first Hispanic Special Agent In Charge and the first Hispanic Deputy Director of Strategy in the history of the Internal Revenue Service. He served on Internal Revenue Service committees and various task forces including the Southeast Regional Compliance Council, the Hispanic Employment Program, and was the Hispanic Internal Revenue Employees Chapter President in St. Paul, Minnesota. He was voted the Criminal Investigation Chief of the year for Mid-states Region in 1995 and EEO Manager of the Year in the North Central District for 1997. In 2002 José was selected as the Special Agent in Charge of the Year.

 

After retiring from the IRS, José worked in the private sector and was a founding partner of The MRW Consulting Group, LLP before finally forming JMPA Consulting and Advisory with his partner and former colleague Scott Rebein.

 

José's professional accomplishments were matched by enthusiastic personal and community pursuits. He loved to golf – especially with his best friend Manny and nephew Jan. He would be easy to spot on the golf course, as he would likely be wearing something purple in honor of his all-time favorite team, the Minnesota Vikings. He also loved games of chance, and whether by luck or by skill, he fared remarkably well at the 3-card poker table. A lover of all forms of entertainment, he was equally likely to be found besting his son, Miguel at a game of Rainbow Six on his Xbox or binge watching a new TV show with his daughter, Dee. The Marreros used technology to bind their tight-knit family, sending thousands of emoji-filled text messages to share a joke, provide updates on work or family, or just to feel closer from across the country. True to his Caribbean roots, José loved nothing more than to bring his family together on a cruise ship where they would enjoy tropical weather, lavish meals, exciting excursions, and most of all the joy of uninterrupted time together.

 

His commitment to community extended even beyond his own Puerto Rican heritage: José was a proud member of the Italian-American Civic League of Fort Lauderdale, a Knight of the 4th Degree in the Knights of Columbus, and a member of the Lions Clubs International of Lino Lakes, Minnesota. He spent much of his free time doing pro bono work for his church and volunteering his time and services to Habitat for Humanity in Broward. He also was a sponsor of their Youth Program Field Day for many years.

 

One of José's passions was his time spent with the Association of Former Special Agents of the Internal Revenue Service (AFSA). He served as the Committee Chairperson for the Investigative Seminar from 2005-2014, 2nd Vice President in 2007-2008, Vice President/President Elect in 2009-2010 and as President from 2011 to 2012. He was both honored and humbled to work with his peers in this capacity and thoroughly enjoyed the annual conventions he attended with his wife, Virgie.

 

José, known to his son as 'Pop' and his daughter as 'Daddy', loved to laugh and to make others laugh. Rarely could one find him upset or angry for anything longer than a moment. He was generous with his time and resources, and he welcomed others into his life and his home. He was a mentor and leader. He was a family man and a consummate professional. He was a hero to more people than he ever realized.

 

The memorial service for José will be held at Saint Vincent Catholic Church on Saturday, October 3, 2015, at 11:00 a.m. The church is located at 6350 NW 18th Street, Margate, FL 33063. For questions or directions, contact the church at (954) 972-0434.

 

Those wishing to show their support may consider a contribution to the Sylvester Comprehensive Cancer Center in acknowledgement of the tireless care given to José by Dr. Denise Pereira, Michelle Sapp, DNP, ARNP, BC and Michelle Charlow and the vital work being done there in the fight against cancer. http://sylvester.org/community/giving/make-a-gift-today No flowers please.

 

"It is a grand mistake to think of being great without goodness and I pronounce it as certain that there was never a truly great man that was not at the same time truly virtuous." -Benjamin Franklin

[September 01, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Jose Ismael Marrero It is with deep sadness that AFSA-IRS announces the death of Jose Ismael Marrero. Retired SAC José I. Marrero passed away on August 20, 2015. José retired on May 1, 2004 after 30 years of IRS service, 24 ½ with CI.

 

It is with deep sadness that AFSA-IRS announces the death of Jose Ismael Marrero.

Retired SAC José I. Marrero passed away on August 20, 2015. José retired on May 1, 2004 after 30 years of IRS service, 24 ½ with CI. He began his IRS career in 1975 as a taxpayer service representative in Puerto Rico.  José became a revenue agent in 1977 in New Orleans and became a special agent in 1979.  He held positions as a group manager in Cheyenne, WY, Denver, CO and Jackson, MS; was a senior regional analyst in Dallas, TX; and was the Chief/Special Agent in Charge in St. Paul, MN and Plantation, FL.  In April 2003, José was selected as the Deputy Director of Strategy at Headquarters. After retiring from CI, Mr. Marrero started his own consulting company in Fort Lauderdale, FL.

 

Jose joined AFSA-IRS in 2004, and was very active serving as Board Member in various capacities.  He became Regional Director in 2006, 2nd VP in 2007, VP/President Elect in 2009.  He served as President in 2011 and 2012 and continued on the Board as Immediate Past President in 2013 and 2014.  Jose was the AFSA – IRS Convention Host in 2013.  Additionally, he was the Committee Chairperson for the Investigative Seminars from 2005 – 2014.

 

Please join the Marrero Family for a Memorial Service in Memory of a Wonderful Man Jose Ismael Marrero.

 

Date:    Saturday, October 3, 2015

Time:    11:00 am

Place:   Saint Vincent Catholic Church

            6350 NW 18th Street

            Margate, FL 33063

 

 

Jim Meyers has identified a Marriott Town House Suites Hotel in Pompano Beach.  The hotel appears to be very easily reached as you travel South bound on I-95.  You will need to use exit 32-proceed South on the frontage road and go West/left onto West Commercial Blvd-turn right/North onto NW 31st Ave. 

 

The senior rate for a Friday 10/2 arrival is + tax.  A studio/full kitchen-comp breakfast, queen bedroom allows a cancellation 24 hours prior to arrival.   Check-in is 3:00 PM

 

Hotel specs re Jose’s Memorial-The Marriott Town House Suites Ft. Lauderdale West is located @ 3100 West Prospect Rd, phone # (954) 484-2214.

 

[September 01, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Karl Von Lipsey, Sr.

[September 01, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Karl Von Lipsey, Sr.

[July 30, 2015] Sad News: Passing of William Gary Gourley

William Gary Gourley, 73, of Paducah died on Sunday, July, 26, 2015 at Lourdes Hospital in Paducah.

Mr. Gourley was a retired US Treasury Agent and a member of Brookport First Christian Church.

Surviving is his wife, Mary Ruth Gourley of Paducah; on son, David William Gourley of Gainesville, VA; one daughter, Kelly Lynne Bornefeld of Hendersonville, TN; and four grandchildren.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Winifred Holland Gourley and Freda Wilma Gourley.

Memorial services will be at 2:00pm on Wednesday, July 29, 2015 at Lindsey Funeral Home with the Rev. Tommy Tucker and the Rev. Tom Hughes officiating.

Friends may call from 12:00pm to service hour on Wednesday at the funeral home.

Memorial contributions may be made to First Baptist Church of Paducah at 2890 Broadway St. Paducah, 42001 or McCracken County Humane Society of 4000 Coleman Rd. Paducah, KY 42001.

Lindsey Funeral Home of Paducah is in charge of arrangements.

[July 14, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Joe Flanagan

Joe Flanagan was a Special Agent and SSA in Miami, Florida for many years. Joe died on Sunday, July 12, 2015.  Anyone desiring to send a note of condolence should send it to Joe's widow, Bonnie Flanagan, 9812 S.W. 77 Place, Miami, FL 33156. The business address in the AFSA directory is an old office address.

 

Joe's Memorial Service and burial will be at the Caballero-Woodlawn Funeral Home at Woodlawn South Cemetery, 11655 SW 117 Ave, Miami, FL. on Friday July 17, Viewing @ 9AM; Service @ 11AM; Burial @ Noon. In lieu of flowers the family is requesting donations in Joe's memory to either the Diabetes Society or the Wounded Warrior Project. Please pass the word to anyone who may have known Joe. 

[July 07, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Pota Coston, AFSA-IRS Member

COUNTY COMMISSIONER POTA COSTON DIES AFTER MONTHS LONG BATTLE WITH CANCER

            FAYETTE NEWS COMMUNITY, FAYETTE COUNTY, NEWS, TOP STORIES, TYRONE JULY 3, 2015

 

Fayette County News has confirmed that Fayette County Commission Vice-Chair Pota Coston died today as a result of a months long battle with breast cancer.

Coston has the distinction of having been the first black candidate to serve on the Fayette County Board of Commissioners when she was sworn in this January.

Coston has been married 33 years to her husband Bernard Coston. They have one son, Bernie.

A prayer vigil to honor Coston was held Thursday night. Click here to read our coverage of the vigil, which was heavily attended and featured more than 20 speakers who were glowing in their praise for Coston.

Fayette County Administrator Steve Rapson confirmed the news, saying Coston’s husband, Bernard, had informed County Chairman Charles Oddo of her death.

“It’s a sad day for Fayette County,” Rapson said.

 

Pota Coston changed local history this year. On Jan. 2, she was sworn in as the first African-American woman elected to the Fayette County Commission. But this is just the latest in an amazing string of firsts for Pota. Her accomplishments span an astounding federal government career, and many suspect she has a few more firsts yet to come.

Pota grew up in Elkins, W. Va., a small town with an even smaller African-American population, and she credits her upbringing for her strong sense of community and foundation of core values. Her mother was the owner and operator of a hair salon, and her father worked for the phone company. Pota was a member of student council and National Honor Society, and was head cheerleader in high school.

“Living in such a small town, you had to learn to get along with different types of people,” Pota explains. “It was a close-knit community. Everyone knew each other, and we were always welcome in one another’s homes.”

In 1976, Pota began classes at Marshall University, which was still grieving after losing its football team in a plane crash in 1970. She was well on her way to a degree in criminal justice when she was approached about a very unusual internship opportunity. The IRS’ Criminal Investigation division wanted to offer her a student co-op position: She would finish her degree while beginning a career in federal law enforcement. Accepting the position would mean she would have a career path after graduation, but she’d have to add a whopping 24 hours – nine in business and 15 in pure accounting – to her studies.

It would also mean blazing a serious trail. Although the federal government was then in the midst of a major initiative to recruit more women and minorities, the IRS, and particularly its prestigious criminal investigation unit, were still almost exclusively white and male. But Pota, always interested in a challenge, was intrigued. In 1979, she began her new coursework and her co-op position. As expected, it wasn’t always easy.

“It was tough at times,” she admits. “They didn’t know how to work with a woman, and they didn’t want to train me because they didn’t think I’d stick with it. It took a lot of work to prove I was serious. Once I became an agent, I attended conferences and began building a network, and then I had resources, but it was very difficult at first.

“In fact, one of the main reasons I accepted management positions later on was so that I could make sure new agents didn’t have to go through some of the struggles I experienced.”

 

Despite the pressures and doubt surrounding her, Pota succeeded beautifully and began her field work after graduation. In 1981, she broke two barriers when she became the first African American and the first female special agent in the state of West Virginia. In 1988, she was promoted to a manager role and moved to Detroit, becoming the first female manager for the Detroit field office, which encompassed 12 working groups throughout the state.

“She was my very first supervisor in the organization,” explains Veronica Hyman-Pillot, Pota’s friend and former employee, “and she was such an inspiration. Over the years, she’s served as an incredible mentor for young people from all walks of life. She’s very compassionate and she has a real eye for seeing people’s talents and abilities – and for helping them find their areas of weakness and turn them into strengths. She inspired me to pursue my goals, and I wouldn’t have achieved my level of success in the organization without her influence.”

Just two years later, Pota was assigned to a regional analyst post in Atlanta, then returned to Detroit as branch chief in 1993. That position now goes by the more familiar title of Assistant Special Agent in Charge (ASAC), and is every bit as demanding and prestigious as it sounds.

Not only was Pota the first female ASAC in Detroit, she subsequently became the first African American in the country to be named Branch Chief of the Year. She was promoted again in 1998, this time to division chief, which is now titled Special Agent in Charge. This was an incredibly rare feat for a woman or a minority. Her new role was located in the New Orleans Field Office, one of the most challenging in the nation. Her territory covered the states of Louisiana, Mississippi and Alabama, but also spanned eight U. S. Attorney’s offices.

Once again, however, Pota shone. She was recognized as Chief of the Year and was the first African – American woman to receive such recognition.

Despite her incredibly demanding career and groundbreaking rise through federal government ranks, Pota always made sure to be there for her family. She has one son, Bernie, and cites her husband, Bernard, as a major inspiration in her life.

 

 “When I look back on my wife’s career,” says Bernard, “one thing I can absolutely, positively say is that she was always willing to take risks – from taking those accounting classes in college to all her career moves. Every step along the way was a step into the unknown.

But we always maintained a solid faith, and our mantra throughout all the moves was ‘home is where you’re at,’ meaning that, as long as the family was together, we were home. That kept us grounded.”

In 2000, the family moved to Washington D.C. when Pota was selected to be deputy director for the new Office of Strategy. Her division was responsible for human resources, training, finance, and information technology nationwide as well as divisional review, strategic planning, and more. Under her guidance, her division became one of the first in IRS to use online job applications and an early adopter of knowledge management databases. She achieved the federal government’s highest rank when she became director of strategy and only the second African American female promoted into the senior executive service with the IRS, Criminal Investigation Division.

When an opportunity as Director of Field Operation for the Southeast Area opened up in 2004, the Coston family returned to the Atlanta area. They had loved it before and wanted to be closer to family in Tallahassee.

“We were looking for some place close to the airport,” says Pota of their move to Fayette County. “My position required about 80 percent travel, and I didn’t want to spend even more time traveling back and forth to the airport. Tyrone reminded me immediately of home, and we knew it was where we wanted to be. We love it.”

For the last four years of her federal career, Pota was responsible for the field operations of 12 states plus Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands. She retired from the IRS in 2008 and did what anyone with her kind of drive might be expected to do; she asked, “Okay, now what?”

The answer was community involvement and volunteer work. Already a member of both the Women in Federal Law Enforcement and the National Association of Retired Special Agents, she joined a staggering number of local organizations, including the Fayette Chamber, Fayette County Ethics Board, Fayette FACTOR, Tyrone Founders Day Committee, and Women Working Wonders. She even launched an LLC devoted to teaching college students interview techniques, how to navigate through a corporate culture, and how to find a mentor. And then she discovered that the Association of Village PRIDE, Inc. (AVPRIDE), a Fayette organization specializing in leadership development for teens and young adults, was searching for a director of career exploration. She applied and, unsurprisingly, landed the job.

 

 “She just blew me away,” says Pam Reid, director of AVPRIDE. “Not only her experience, which is tremendous, but the heart she has for community and youth.”

In her new role, Pota had a chance to help teens obtain internships, establish mentors, and explore different fields of work. She set up mock interviews and connected participants with attorneys, the FAA, medical professionals, theatre organizations, and veterinarians – virtually anyone who might help guide the youths in pursuing their careers of interest. Eventually, she became the director of AVPRIDE’s workforce development program, which provides tutoring as well as courses and experiential learning in life skills and leadership. She continues to serve as a consultant in that role today.

Then, as the 2011 Tyrone Town Council elections began to gear up, a new challenge crossed Pota’s horizon when a friend asked if she’d considered running. Pota was surprised, but intrigued. The Hatch Act prohibits federal employees from holding elected office, so she’d literally never considered the idea. But once she started thinking about it and talking to the important people in her life, interest began to take hold. After all, she was active in her sorority in college and remains so as an alum, and one of Delta Sigma Theta’s very first official acts was to participate in the women’s suffrage march and remains strong in the area of social action. So she campaigned again for Town Council and came in only 300 votes short, an impressive showing for a relative newcomer. When a seat came open again in 2013, she ran again, but lost by a tiny margin: six votes. For someone so committed to community improvement, it was a disappointment, certainly, but Pota’s positive outlook remained.

 

 “Pota’s fortitude has always amazed me,” says Bernard. “Not only throughout her career with the IRS and all of her challenges there, but during the elections. She always took the high road and she never gave up, even though it was discouraging sometimes, especially when she came so close.”

Perhaps everything really does happen for a reason, however, because people soon began calling Pota to encourage her to run for the open spot on the Fayette County Commission. She wasn’t entirely sure she was ready to face another campaign, but she talked to her husband and prayed for guidance. And she kept getting calls of encouragement. Last fall, she ran and won. She was sworn into her new office on January 2, 2015. Those around her are elated.

“I watched the campaign from beginning to end,” recalls Pam. “I was out there with her on corners, holding signs and waving at people, and I just remember thinking, ‘Gosh, she has such passion for positive change.’ I knew that if anyone should have this opportunity it was Pota, and I was thrilled when she won. I think she’s going to do wonderful things.”

Her husband agrees, and he’s confident that Pota can make a difference in Fayette County.

“She’s always been a leader, a visionary, and willing to work with all people,” says Bernard. “Sometimes politicians will tell you what you want to hear, but Pota will not tell you ‘yes’ or ‘no’ until she has done her research, understands the issue, and determines the best solution. People should realize that she is extremely approachable and wants to hear their concerns. She is willing to serve and represent all residents in Fayette County.”

Pota, herself, has a clear vision for Fayette’s future.

 

 “Fayette County has tremendous potential,” she says. “We need to develop a plan to grow our economy, attract and keep our young people here, obtain gainful employment, provide opportunities for our senior citizens, and make Fayette County the best place for people to live, work, and play. I want to make a difference, but it’s going to take all of us working together. We need to hear from all segments of the community, from people with different backgrounds and experiences. The Fayette Visioning Initiative is an excellent start to move us forward. My main goal is for everyone in Fayette County to experience an exceptional quality of life.

“I see myself as a bridge-builder, a servant-leader,” she notes. “I’m a person who genuinely cares, and I truly, truly believe in working together. I always have.”

[June 25, 2015] Sad News: Passing of AFSA-IRS Member Russell T. DiBella

 

Russell T. DiBella

 

Russell T. DiBella passed peacefully at home from this life into eternal life on Father's Day, June 21st, 2015. Some say that when a Dad passes away on Father's Day, there are special gifts waiting for him in heaven.

 

Russell was a wonderful and loving husband and provider to his wife of 58 years, Mary (McGivern) DiBella, his five children, Diane (Jim) Hanna, Carole (Keith) Herndon, Kathleen (Gerald) Tower, Russell C (Kelley) DiBella, Michael (Gretchen) DiBella, 13 grandchildren, one great grandchild with another on the way, and his sisters Marie Schoedler and Delores (Joe) DelGross.

 

Russell was a graduate of North East Catholic High and LaSalle University where he studied accounting. He served in the United States Navy on the USS Wisconsin during the Korean War where was a member of the Navy Band.

 

Russell had long and successful career in Law Enforcement as a Special Agent with the Treasury Department, Division of Criminal Investigation. He spent a brief time with the Secret Service on special assignment protecting Spiro T. Agnew. After retiring from the Treasury Department, he spent 10 years working for the State of NJ, Attorney General's Office. Upon retiring from the State AG's Office he worked for the FBI as a background investigator.

 

Russell had a love for music and was an accomplished piano player. During his time in the Naval Band, Russell made an appearance on the Ed Sullivan "Toast of the Town" Show in September of 1955. Russell was an active member of Holy Eucharistic Church in Tabernacle, NJ serving as a Eucharistic Minister as well as in the Knights of Columbus.  Russell loved his cats, traveling, sports, especially the Eagles, ice cream, the shore, dining out and entertaining. However, what he loved most was spending time with his family.

 

Relatives and friends are invited to gather on Wednesday June 24, 2015 from 6-8PM and again on Thursday June 25, 2015 from 10-11AM at Church of the Holy Eucharist, 520 Medford Lakes Rd. Tabernacle, NJ 08088. A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 11AM. Interment to follow at Brig. Gen. Wm. C. Doyle Veterans Cemetery, Wrightstown, NJ. Arrangements are under the direction of and have been entrusted to Mathis Funeral Home, Medford, NJ.

 

 

[June 19, 2015] CI & Friends Golf Outing

8:00 a.m. Shot Gun Start

Prince Williams Golf Course

Nokesville, VA

Four-Person Scramble - Enter your team or as a single,  and we'll get you a team!  

Contact 

[June 12, 2015] Sad News: Passing of George J. Kurvers

Kurvers, George J. Passed away peacefully on April 28, 2015 at the age of 99. George was a native of Carver but grew up in Shakopee and graduated in 1939 from the College of St. Thomas with an accounting major. After he graduated from St. Thomas he went to work for Butler Bros., an iron mining company, but left after World War II broke out. Kurvers tried to get through the Navy's officer training program at Notre Dame University, but a knee injury he suffered from football sophomore year at St. Thomas resulted in a medical discharge in 1942. After this, George joined the service Intelligence Division of the IRS which he worked until he retired in July of '73. He was only retired for a few months before he joined the Minnesota Board on Judicial Standards in which he worked until his final retirement on July 1, 1984 as executive secretary ending a 40 year investigative career. Survived by wife of 65 years, Geraldine (Veigel); daughters, Deborah (Michael) Flanagan & Georgine (George) Larson; grandchildren, Michaela & Kristin Flanagan and Chelsea (Ian) Payne & Kallie Larson. Memorial Mass 10AM, Friday, May 1st at The Church of St. John Neumann, 4030 Pilot Knob Rd., Eagan. Gathering of Family & Friends 1 hour prior to the Mass at church. Memorials preferred to St. Thomas University. Klecatsky & Sons Eagan Chapel 651-454-9488

Published on April 30, 2015

 

[June 12, 2015] Sad News: Passing of LUNDQUIST, James Oliver

 

Lundquist, James Oliver Surrounded by his loving family, was taken home to be with the Lord on May 13th, 2015. He was born in Watertown, South Dakota on July 2, 1924. He grew up in Dawson, Mn and Mpls. He served in the U.S. Army in WWII, in both the European and Japanese theaters. When he returned to Minneapolis after the war he attended the University of Minnesota and received a Bachelor of Arts degree in accounting. He married Phyllis Rice on November 9, 1946. After graduating from the U of M, he accepted a position with the Internal Revenue Service. He served as a criminal investigator in the Intelligence Division of the Treasury Dept. He was active in bringing syndicated crime under control in Minneapolis and St. Paul, and retired after a very successful career in criminal investigation. He enjoyed family, many friends, world wide traveling with Phyllis, golf and dancing. He is survived by his wife, Phyllis; daughters, Lou Ellen (George) Gilbertson, Diane (Bruce) Berndt, Jeanne (Paul) Zimmer, Patricia Lundquist; son, James (Dawn) Lundquist; grandchildren, Vanessa Pechacek, Kirsten Prouty, Rachel Odland, Michael Kadier, Sean Lundquist, Conor Lundquist, Katy Lundquist and 9 great grandchildren. Funeral service Monday, May 18th, 2:00 P.M. at Normandale Lutheran Church, 6100 Normandale Road, Edina, MN.

 

 

[June 12, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Robert E. "Bob" Chandler, Jr

 

Robert E. "Bob" Chandler, Jr.

 

Robert E. "Bob" Chandler, Jr., 89, passed away on March 24, 2015 following complications from surgery. He was born on November 28, 1925 in Yakima, WA. He attended local public schools in Yakima while enjoying hunting, fishing and the many other outdoor activities available in the rural Yakima Valley in the 1930's and 1940's. During the years of his youth, Bob developed a strong sense of fairness, conservation, self-reliance and numerous life-long friends. Upon graduation from Yakima High School in 1943, Bob joined millions of other men and women, from America's Greatest Generation, by enlisting in the Armed Forces. After training as a Military Policeman, Bob was stationed in the South Pacific until well after cessation of combat operations. Bob mustered out in early 1946 with an honorable discharge.

 

Bob took advantage of the GI bill by attending Seattle University majoring in Accounting. While at Seattle U, he was introduced to Ann Egeland by a mutual friend. Bob and Ann were subsequently married on January 16, 1954. Bob and Ann chose the developing area of Edmonds as their new home. Together they had two boys, first, Mark, then Stephen.

 

In 1952, Bob went to work for the Internal Revenue Service as a Revenue Collection Officer. Later he made a career move into the Criminal Investigation Division, becoming a Special Agent for the majority of his career. During the 1950's, 60's and 70's Bob conducted investigations into white collar crime, political corruption, rackets, police corruption and illegal narcotics trafficking. Because of his law enforcement experience, confidence, demeanor and professionalism, Bob was the consummate role model for younger agents. Bob can be summed up with one word-"integrity".

 

Following mandatory law enforcement retirement, Bob became actively involved in real estate property management for many years. He enjoyed sport fishing, and looked forward to his yearly bird and duck hunting trips with his life-long friends and dogs in Eastern Washington.

 

Sadly, Mark was stricken with ALS in 2003. Bob was actively involved in the daily care of his oldest son until Mark's passing in 2006 Bob is survived by his wife Ann, his son Stephen, his brother, Dick, two granddaughters, Sam and Alex, two nieces Caren and Cathy and nephew, Jeff.

 

[June 12, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Ronald L. Zabel

 

RONALD L. ZABEL, 83 PEORIA - Ronald L. Zabel, 83, of Peoria, IL, formerly of Davis, IL and Berwyn, IL, passed away at 12:30 a.m. Friday, May 22, 2015, at Bickford Senior Living, Peoria. He was born October 28, 1931, in Chicago, IL to William F. and Jessie (Dennison) Zabel. He married Marilyn M. Eagleton on June 25, 1960, in Fieldon, IL. She survives. Also surviving are children, Lorena (Allen) Smuda of Willow Springs, IL and Lisa (Scott) Herman of Germantown Hills, IL; and grandchildren, Kevin and Kyle Smuda, and Brad, Lindsay and Cory Herman. He was preceded in death by his parents. Ron served in the U.S. Army during the Korean War. He worked for the Internal Revenue Service Chicago office as an investigator, retiring after 25 years. Ron was an avid reader, traveler, and lover of crossword puzzles, card games and Jeopardy. He was brilliant and meticulous with details. Ron spent his retirement years with his wife, Marilyn, at their lake house in Davis, IL playing golf, boating, traveling and enjoying his grandchildren. He was a wonderful provider and a loyal son, nephew, husband, father and grandfather. A Memorial Service will be held at 11 a.m. Saturday, May 30, 2015, at Mason Funeral Home Germantown Hills Chapel, with Pastor Joel Dryden officiating. Cremation rites will be accorded. Burial of ashes will be held at a later date. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be given to the Alzheimer's Association Central Illinois Chapter, 612 West Glen Avenue, Peoria, IL 61614. Online condolences at masonfuneralhomes.com. - See more at: http://www.legacy.com/obituaries/rrstar/obituary.aspx?pid=174920505#sthash.RwM91rWe.dpuf

[June 08, 2015] In Another Place and Time by: Robert Holm

 

AFSA Member Robert Holm has published a book:

"In Another Place and Time: My 31 Months in Vietnam" The book  can be purchased on Amazon for .95, or as a Kindle version for .99.  I am also selling the books direct for .95 (includes tax and shipping in the continental U.S.). Payment can be made through Pay Pal, by check, or cash.  If you would like to purchase direct, please contact me at:

Email:  

Email:  

Cell:     (623) 313-8511

 

 

[April 29, 2015] T-Men Mob Museum (link to video presentation)

 

https://youtu.be/VZQLONOiJjY

 

 

[March 27, 2015] Mysterious Mike Malone

 By DAVID PORTER, Associated Press

MOUNTAINSIDE, N.J. (AP) — The gun is a triumph of American craftsmanship from the early 20th century, its sleek barrel familiar to anyone raised on the movies of Bogart and Cagney, "Scarface" and "Little Caesar."

Except this Smith & Wesson .38 special has real-life stories to tell, stories of America's most legendary mobster and the undercover agent who was instrumental in toppling him when so many others had failed.

Stored for decades in attics, closets and a bank safe-deposit box in New Jersey, the gun belonging to former IRS agent Michael Malone — and possibly used by members of Al Capone's gang — is headed to Las Vegas, where it will be part of an the exhibit at The Mob Museum beginning in mid-April.

 

More than a lifeless artifact, the gun also represents a young man's quest to learn more about a mysterious relative, and an effort by an often-forgotten arm of the government to shed more light on the men behind the arrest and prosecution of Capone.

"Michael Malone was, I believe, the greatest undercover agent in the history of law enforcement," said Paul Camacho, a former head of IRS criminal investigations in Las Vegas and an unofficial agency historian. "This was the riskiest assignment you could ever think of. People were dying left and right, witnesses were dying left and right. Nobody wanted to be with these guys."

Malone infiltrated Capone's gang and worked undercover for nearly three years, Camacho said, passing himself off as a wiseguy from Philadelphia who had migrated to Chicago. He gained the mobster's trust to the point that he was invited to a going away party when it appeared Capone was going to plead guilty in exchange for a reduced sentence.

Capone eventually was convicted on tax charges and sentenced to prison, a fact well-known to mob historians and the general public. IRS investigators, known then as "T-Men" for their affiliation with the U.S. Treasury Department, feel their contributions have been given short shrift over the years.

Part of that may be due to the 1987 movie "The Untouchables," which credited Prohibition agent Eliot Ness with orchestrating Capone's downfall. Sean Connery's character, Jimmy Malone, was loosely based on Michael Malone but was a Chicago police officer in the film.

"The real story of Mike Malone hasn't been told," said Jonathan Larsen, head of IRS criminal investigations in New Jersey, whose office is overseeing the examination of the gun and its transport to Nevada.

Growing up in northern New Jersey in the 1950s, Marty Dolan often wondered about the great-uncle who would always come to visit dressed in a fedora and overcoat and who never shared much about his past or present. After Malone's death in Minnesota in 1960, Dolan, now a doctor in California, slowly began to fill in the gaps.

The gun — found under Malone's pillow after he died, according to Dolan's mother — was among Malone's effects stored in various family residences in New Jersey before. They ended up on a shelf in a closet at Dolan's sister's house on Long Beach Island.

A few years ago, after researching Malone on the Internet, Dolan realized the gun was a key piece of history.

That view was shared by Geoff Schumacher, the Mob Museum's director of content, who will include the gun in an exhibit called "Follow The Money" dedicated to the T-Men and their conquests.

"When we learned there was something tangible like a gun, rather than paperwork, that we could put on display, we were excited," he said.

IRS officials say the gun wasn't Malone's service weapon, and Schumacher said he's assuming it was used by Malone while undercover. Whether it came from Capone's organization could be answered if ATF agents can raise the gun's filed-off serial number, Larsen said.

That would provide another clue to a man a colleague once referred to as "the mysterious Mike Malone."

[March 23, 2015] THURSDAY, APRIL 16: FOLLOW THE MONEY, THE UNSUNG INTELLIGENCE UNIT THAT BROUGHT DOWN THE MOB

Here is the link summarizing the event for the grand opening of the TMEN exhibit at the Mob Museum.   

http://themobmuseum.org/archives/2015/01/04/thursday-april-16-follow-the-money-a-look-at-the-irs-unit-responsible-for-busting-mobsters/

 

 

 

THURSDAY, APRIL 16: FOLLOW THE MONEY, THE UNSUNG INTELLIGENCE UNIT THAT BROUGHT DOWN THE MOB

Cost of the evening is with 10% discount for Museum Members.

 

WHO PUT AMERICA’S MOST NOTORIOUS MOBSTERS BEHIND BARS?

ANSWER: THE INVESTIGATIVE SLEUTHS OF THE IRS.

 

These Treasury Department agents or T-Men, under the leadership of Director Elmer Irey, quietly built tax evasion charges  against the likes of mobsters Al Capone, Nucky Johnson, Waxey Gordon and Dutch Schultz; public official Huey Long and businessman Moses Annenberg. While the G-Men garnered the headlines and lunchboxes, the T-Men put some of the biggest mobsters and corrupt politicians behind bars. The Treasury Department’s Special Intelligence Unit pursued organized crime bosses and other criminals for not paying taxes on their ill-gotten gains — and their record of success was astonishing.

The Intelligence Unit’s key figures, especially Irey, Frank Wilson and Mike Malone, deserve more fame for their financial sleuthing skills. And even today, the IRS Criminal Investigation division continues to be an effective force in the fight against organized crime.

A panel of nationally known Justice Department and IRS Criminal Investigation experts will share the insider’s story behind the scenes on how Irey’s team was responsible for busting numerous mobsters and others in the public eye. The panel will include:

            Tom Moriarty, special investigator with the Department of Justice United States Attorney’s Office

            Rich Weber, chief of IRS Criminal Investigation, Washington, D.C.

            Paul Camacho, former IRS criminal investigator, Las Vegas

            Geoff Schumacher, moderator

BACKGROUND ON INTELLIGENCE UNIT 

The IRS created the Intelligence Unit in 1919 to investigate widespread allegations of tax fraud. Elmer Irey was put in charge, and he transferred six Postal Service inspectors to create the new unit. In 1978, the Intelligence Unit’s name changed to Criminal Investigation.

The Intelligence Unit’s efforts were given a boost in 1927, when the U.S. Supreme Court ruled that a criminal’s ill-gotten gains could be taxed. This opened the door for prosecution of the likes of Mob bosses, business schemers and corrupt politicians on tax evasion charges. The court’s majority opinion was written by Oliver Wendell Holmes.

Other big T-Men cases:

            Kansas City political boss Tom Pendergast

            Louisiana Governor Huey Long

            Charles Lindbergh baby kidnapping

            Businessman Moe Annenberg

            New York mobster Dutch Schultz

            Chicago mobster Frank Nitti

            Chicago mobster Johnny Torrio

            Chicago mobster Ralph Capone

            Chicago mobster Murray Humphreys

            St. Paul mobster Leon Gleckman

 

The Mob Museum is planning a new exhibit on third floor featuring artifacts from the families of T-Men legends Elmer Irey and Mike Malone, as well as detailed storytelling about the achievements of the Treasury Department’s Intelligence Unit. The exhibit also will include information on how the IRS investigative unit helped solve the kidnapping of the son of Charles and Anne Morrow Lindbergh.

PANELISTS

 

Thomas C. Moriarty, special investigator with the Department of Justice United States Attorney’s Office

Since 2003, Moriarty has been assigned as the special investigator for the United States Attorney’s Office in Chicago. Moriarty’s duties are to investigate complex criminal financial crimes including money laundering, terror financing and asset forfeiture cases. Prior to this, for over 25 years, he was a special agent with the Criminal Investigation Division of the IRS. He has been assigned to the Organized Crime Program his entire career. Moriarty was also the organized crime special agent assigned to the United States Attorney’s Office and has been the lead investigative agent on numerous O.C. investigations. He was the lead case agent on the most successful O.C. case ever prosecuted in Northern Illinois.

A cadre instructor who has taught over 1,000 federal and local law enforcement personnel both locally and at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center, at the FBI academy and Northwestern University, Moriarty has also taught hundreds of business professional about financial investigations.

During his career he has received many awards including IRS Criminal Investigation “Special Agent of the Year”, finalist for Federal Law Enforcement Agent of the Year, Chicago Crime Commission Federal Agent of the Year, Illinois State Crime Commission Federal Agent of the Year and was the subject interviewee on the NBC news magazine program Dateline about his activities in combating organized crime. He also has appeared on the Discovery Channel about his experiences with the Federal Witness Protection Program. Moriarty has a degree in finance and is a certified fraud examiner.

 

Richard Weber, Chief, IRS Criminal Investigation, Washington, D.C.

As Chief, IRS Criminal Investigation, Richard Weber heads the Internal Revenue Service Division responsible for investigating criminal violations of the tax code and related financial crimes. Headquartered in Washington, D.C., Weber oversees a worldwide staff of nearly 3,500 CI employees, including approximately 2,500 special agents, who are responsible for investigating crimes involving tax, money laundering, public corruption, cyber, ID theft, narcotics and terrorist-financing.

Before joining IRS CI, Weber was the deputy chief of the Investigation Division and chief of the Major Economic Crimes Bureau in the Manhattan District Attorney’s Office. In this position, he was responsible for managing prosecutors, investigators, analysts and paralegals handling investigations into securities and commodities fraud, large-scale mortgage and insurance fraud, Ponzi schemes, international money laundering, terrorist financing, sanctions evasion, asset forfeiture and tax crimes.

Weber has previously served as chief of the Asset Forfeiture and Money Laundering Section at the Department of Justice, and as an assistant United States attorney in the eastern district of New York. Weber conducted numerous major money laundering investigations and prosecutions, including some of the largest forfeitures ever entered against financial institutions for sanctions violations.

Weber is a two-time recipient of the Attorney General’s John Marshall Award, the highest honor for Justice Department lawyers.

 

Paul Camacho, special agent in charge, Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation, retired

Paul Camacho, special agent in charge for the Las Vegas Field Office of Internal Revenue Service Criminal Investigation retired, was named to this position in May of 2009 and retired in 2014. He was responsible for planning, directing and evaluating activities of criminal investigation employees in Utah and Nevada. Under Camacho’s leadership the LVFO garnered unprecedented local and national media attention for its succession of high impact investigations.

Camacho is a certified public accountant and a graduate of California State University East Bay with a degree in accounting. Over the course of his career in IRS CI, Camacho oversaw a number of sophisticated financial investigations involving offshore abusive tax schemes, high dollar Ponzi and investment fraud, large-scale internet fraud, military contract fraud, mortgage fraud, organized crime groups, narcotics money laundering and political corruption. The aggregate dollar value of these crimes exceeds well over a billion dollars.

As the special agent in charge, Camacho led a partnership initiative with the Las Vegas Metropolitan Police Vice division to combat the pervasive illegal sex trade industry. These efforts yielded significant investigations into larger sex trade criminal enterprises. The IRS CI and Metro Vice partnership efforts have been featured extensively by local media special reports and a CNBC documentary which highlighted how IRS CI plays a significant role in dismantling criminal enterprises, much like IRS did long ago with Al Capone.

In coordination with the Nevada Gaming Control Board, Camacho implemented a first-of-its-kind program to foster strong working relations with the Nevada casino industry. This collaboration has led to enhanced quality of information reported to all law enforcement through the bank secrecy act and the development of significant investigations. Through this partnership Camacho and his team have become subject matter experts on how funds flow in and out of large scale casinos and their anti money laundering controls. At request of the U.S. State Department, Mr. Camacho gave presentations to and consulted with high ranking Mexican government officials to assist them in developing best practices for preventing money laundering in their casinos. Other governmental agencies, including FINCEN have consulted with Camacho in an effort to better understand the Nevada casino industry.

Camacho was the keynote speaker at the 2011 Casino Symposium in Singapore sponsored by the Singapore police and Singapore gaming regulatory agency and in April of 2011, he was a keynote speaker at the International Asian Organized Crime and Terrorism Conference. Camacho has given presentations to the American Bar Association national conference on gaming, Association of Certified Anti-Money Laundering Specials (ACAMS) national conference and at the Institute of Internal Auditors Gaming Conferences.

Camacho’s current passion is educating IRS employees and the public on the rich history of CI. He has spearheaded changes to the National Criminal Investigation Training Academy’s curriculum to include for the first time presentations on CI’s legacy as a means to instill pride and sense of purpose among new agents.

[March 06, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Frank L. Smith

FRANK L. SMITH of McLean, VA, 90, died peacefully in his sleep November 27, 2014 in Ft. Collins, Colorado, after a long battle with Parkinson’s Disease and Lewy Body Dementia. 

 

Frank was born May 29, 1924, in Union Hall, VA to the late Nannie Belle Purdue and Pansey Monroe Smith.  He enlisted in the US Navy at the age of 18.  Frank was a Seabee in WWII and was recalled to active duty for the Korean War.  He was later commissioned Lieutenant JG in the Navy Reserves, worked in Naval Intelligence and retired as a Navy Captain.

 

            On August 16, 1947, Frank married Eileen Robertson. While living in Roanoke, VA he earned his degree in economics at Roanoke College.  He relocated to McLean, VA in 1959 and in 1962 joined the IRS as a Special Agent in the Criminal Investigation Division, where he worked until his retirement in 1985.

 

            Upon his retirement, Frank became deeply involved in the early stages of the establishment of the Association of Former Special Agents of the Internal Revenue Service. Before Frank moved into leadership positions, it was a loan from him that provided the seed money for the organization’s administrative costs.  Annual conferences were initially arranged by Frank, along with his good friend and AFSA founding member Ken Wilson.  They worked together to make the general plans for meetings and arranging for hotel accommodations.   He visited other cities at his own expense to make hotel arrangements.  Their first conference in 1990 served as a blueprint for future conferences.

 

            Over the years, Frank moved into leadership positions, serving on the Board of Directors for eleven years, including been elected to the positions of Treasurer, Vice President and Vice President/President Elect and President. He served as President from 1995 – 1996.  One of his more significant accomplishments was the establishment of the AFSA Scholarship Program, which provides financial benefits to the families of AFSA members.  The program now bears his name.

 

            Frank was a lifelong avid golfer.  One of his greatest joys was shooting a 70 on his 70th birthday.  Frank also enjoyed traveling and had visited many interesting countries with his wife, family and friends over the years.

 

            Frank is survived by his wife, Eileen, daughter Linda Smith, son Steve Smith and daughter-in-law Carolyn Smith, plus three granddaughters, Amy Benedum, Amanda Smith and Kat Tamburello.

 

            A funeral service is planned for May 22, 2015, at 11:00 am at the Old Post Chapel at Fort Meyer with interment to follow with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

            God bless him for his service!  He will be missed by his family and many friends.

 

[March 06, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Frank L. Smith

FRANK L. SMITH of McLean, VA, 90, died peacefully in his sleep November 27, 2014 in Ft. Collins, Colorado, after a long battle with Parkinson’s Disease and Lewy Body Dementia. 

 

Frank was born May 29, 1924, in Union Hall, VA to the late Nannie Belle Purdue and Pansey Monroe Smith.  He enlisted in the US Navy at the age of 18.  Frank was a Seabee in WWII and was recalled to active duty for the Korean War.  He was later commissioned Lieutenant JG in the Navy Reserves, worked in Naval Intelligence and retired as a Navy Captain.

 

            On August 16, 1947, Frank married Eileen Robertson. While living in Roanoke, VA he earned his degree in economics at Roanoke College.  He relocated to McLean, VA in 1959 and in 1962 joined the IRS as a Special Agent in the Criminal Investigation Division, where he worked until his retirement in 1985.

 

            Upon his retirement, Frank became deeply involved in the early stages of the establishment of the Association of Former Special Agents of the Internal Revenue Service. Before Frank moved into leadership positions, it was a loan from him that provided the seed money for the organization’s administrative costs.  Annual conferences were initially arranged by Frank, along with his good friend and AFSA founding member Ken Wilson.  They worked together to make the general plans for meetings and arranging for hotel accommodations.   He visited other cities at his own expense to make hotel arrangements.  Their first conference in 1990 served as a blueprint for future conferences.

 

            Over the years, Frank moved into leadership positions, serving on the Board of Directors for eleven years, including been elected to the positions of Treasurer, Vice President and Vice President/President Elect and President. He served as President from 1995 – 1996.  One of his more significant accomplishments was the establishment of the AFSA Scholarship Program, which provides financial benefits to the families of AFSA members.  The program now bears his name.

 

            Frank was a lifelong avid golfer.  One of his greatest joys was shooting a 70 on his 70th birthday.  Frank also enjoyed traveling and had visited many interesting countries with his wife, family and friends over the years.

 

            Frank is survived by his wife, Eileen, daughter Linda Smith, son Steve Smith and daughter-in-law Carolyn Smith, plus three granddaughters, Amy Benedum, Amanda Smith and Kat Tamburello.

 

            A funeral service is planned for May 22, 2015, at 11:00 am at the Old Post Chapel at Fort Meyer with interment to follow with full military honors at Arlington National Cemetery.  In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Wounded Warrior Project.

 

            God bless him for his service!  He will be missed by his family and many friends.

 

[February 11, 2015] Sad News: Passing of Warren E. Harrison

In Memory of

Warren E. Harrison

 

January 25, 1940 - July 10, 2014

Obituary

 

Warren E. Harrison, 74, died in his home in Brunswick, GA on Thursday, July 10, 2014, surrounded by family and friends following an ongoing illness.

Warren was born in Baltimore, MD on January 25, 1940 to his father Morley "Moe" Harrison and mother E. Elizabeth (Buckman) Harrison. He was the beloved husband of the late Ernestine "Erni" Harrison, the loving father of three daughters, Kathi Smith and Michael of Brunswick, GA; Toni Smoot of Harpers Ferry, WV; Erin Drury and Don of Waverly, GA; devoted grandfather to his five grandchildren, Alan L. Brown of Martinsburg, WV, who predeceased him on March 22, 2014; Joseph Harrison of Charlestown, WV; Shannon Smoot of Atlanta, GA; Daniel Drury of Waverly ,GA and great grandson, Grant Harrison of Charlestown, WV. He is also survived by Claire, his best friend and furry companion of many years and many special friends, too numerous to mention.

Warren graduated from Mt. Airy H.S in MD in 1958, then went on to VA Tech and earned a B.S in Science and graduated in 1962. Immediately after graduation he began a long distinguished career with the U.S Treasury Department as a special agent, advancing to Director of Operations, advancing again to Assistant Regional Commissioner of Criminal Investigations Midwest region in Chicago, IL from 1982-1987. He retired in 1990 after 28 years of service. Warren served several years in the National Guard, and retired after reaching the rank of Major. After retirement, Warren and Erni relocated to St. Simons Island and started his tax consulting business, which he continued until his illness this year.

Marshside was a place he called home, and would go nightly to see his friends and socialize, he was known and loved by all as he knew and loved them. He was referred to as the "Mayor of Marshside."

A memorial service will be announced at a later date. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made to Heartland Hospice, who did a wonderful job helping to care for him.

[January 05, 2015] Good Samaritans with badges help nab iPhone robbery suspects near O'Hare

 

News Local news Breaking News

Good Samaritans with badges help nab iPhone robbery suspects near O'Hare

 

Mark Hicks, 19, left, of the 6900 block of South Parnell Avenue, and Jeffrey L. Mosley, 25, of the 7800 block of South Shore Drive, were charged with robbery, and Mosley also was wanted on a domestic battery warrant, according to the Cook County sheriff's office. (Cook County sheriff's office)

By Rosemary Regina Sobol

Chicago Tribune

 

Good Samaritans with badges help nab iPhone robbery suspects

 

Retired Secret Service agent Jose Franco says he felt a little “invincible’’ when he pulled the badge he still carries and ordered two robbery suspects to "freeze" after they allegedly stole a brand-new iPhone 6 from a 71-year-old man riding the Blue Line to O'Hare.

"Police, I have a gun! I want you to freeze!’’ Franco said he yelled.

Franco didn't actually have a gun, but he had his hands in his pockets, and the two suspects apparently weren't taking any chances.

"As soon as I said freeze, they did,’’ said Franco, 59.

Franco got the phone back, and the suspects were arrested near the Harlem station about 11 a.m. Wednesday.

 

"My adrenaline was high. I probably should have called 911," said Franco, who retired three years ago after working for the Secret Service for three decades. "I was just trying to make sure they didn’t escape with this little old man’s phone.

"I felt like I was an agent again," Franco said.

The victim, Michael, who asked to be identified only by his first name, purchased the phone four days before the theft. During a telephone interview Friday, he said he and his wife were on the train, and he was using the phone to show her information about their flight.

When the train stopped at Harlem, the suspects suddenly emerged from another car.

 

“They were running. I had it in my left hand, and they came and slapped it forward … they just tore out the door," Michael said.

“I was kind of shocked and maybe (had) a little moment of fear, healthy fear."

Then he felt "anger, and it kind of turned into determination," he added. He asked his wife if she could handle the carry-on bags and bolted out the door after the suspects.

He spotted them on a corner, talking, and looking over their shoulders.

“I started running after them, and they started running. They were a lot younger than me. I guess I'm in good shape, but I’m fighting a cold,’’ Michael said.

 

Michael followed the robbers north of the station on Harlem Avenue.

That's where Michael flagged down Franco and a friend who were on their way for an outing in nearby Niles.

"I see this old man up ahead flagging down cars," said Franco, who was driving. "I’m looking at my friend and saying maybe he needs a ride. He was hysterical."

Franco stopped, rolled down his window and asked if he could help.

"Help me, please help me," Michael pleaded, according to Franco and police. "'These two guys just stole my iPhone, and I just bought it a week ago. I’m going to miss my plane.' "

Michael explained that his wife had gone ahead to the airport to check in.

 

"Get inside the truck," Franco told Michael, and they sped off.

As they made a right turn and slowed down, Franco said he spotted the suspects. He told his friend and the victim to follow them on foot while he went around the back through an alley.

Franco said while they were in pursuit, another man joined them, saying he was a retired Chicago police sergeant. The retired sergeant said he had just seen two men running through his yard.

“I could see them jumping fences, house to house,’’ Franco said.

They were about 30 or 40 feet away when Franco yelled and pulled his badge.

“I still had my badge in my pocket,’’ Franco said. "They saw me and they froze and put their hands up and got on their knees."

Franco then yelled for them to give up the phone. The man with the phone tossed it to Franco before fleeing. Franco said he tackled the second suspect before calling 911 and waited until police arrived. He learned later that the second suspect was arrested in the 5600 block of North Neva Avenue.

Franco said he handed the iPhone back to Michael and even gave him a lift to the airport, where he met his wife who "was in tears." The couple made their flight.

Michael said police told him the suspects were not “the dangerous type’’ but said they were “surprised’’ Michael ran after them.

“They're a couple of scared guys who I think their worst nightmare seemed to be unfolding in front of them,’’ Michael said.

Michael was thankful for Franco and the neighbors who helped out.

“A little bit of bonding (happened),’’ Michael said. “It caused a feeling of brotherhood … a special feeling of a community standing up against something.’’

The two suspects -- Mark Hicks 19, of the 6900 block of South Parnell Avenue, and Jeffrey L. Mosley, 25, of the 7800 block of South Shore Drive -- were charged with robbery. Mosley also was wanted on a domestic battery warrant, according to the Cook County sheriff’s office.

On Thursday, Hicks was ordered held in lieu of ,000 bail, and Mosley was ordered held in lieu of ,000 bail, according to court records.

 

[December 01, 2014] Regional Director Malone - 5th in Shooting Competion

IRS-CI OLDER S/A –VS- NEWER S/A

 

By Ray Sherrard:

 

The CIDEA (Criminal Investigation Employees Association for those of you who do not remember) Shootout and Potluck. 

 

 

The old-timers present were Bob Sterling, Rich Malone (who took one of the top five slots in the matches) John Reimer, Virgie Romo, and Ray Sherrard.

 

We had a whole range area to ourselves.  Good food and desserts  - no toilets nearby though tough on us old guys.

 

I can tell you I feel a lot better after seeing the quality of SAs that we are hiring now.   You remember when we came onboard  (l969 for me) that it was all males, and only one black guy, and one or two Asians. 

 

Well today, it is only a few white males, and CI is mostly minority, and  largely female, but the  SAs  there were fit, intelligent, dedicated to the job,  and happy to work  for CI.   Can’t ask for much more than that. I think the agency is in good hands.  They have vastly better equipment than we had-in terms of weapons, vehicles, communications, information-gathering sources etc., but I think that we had more freedom of action in our day.

 

I tried out my Glock 27 with the integrated laser sight (useless in bright daylight) Just about everyone else had larger weapons.  I can tell that I am not getting enough range time in, as my right arm is sore today.   Their scenarios are better than some of our old  “stand at a station, shoot at the paper target   and go home.”     Now you jog up to the firing station, and have multiple steel targets at varying distances, and you shoot off three magazines.  More realistic that our old paper targets.    Also, the range master uses targets that you have to hit in vital areas, or they don’t go down.

 

All in all, it was a good day.

 

We are planning to do this again, John Reimer had a discussion with one of the Managers there, and with the CIDEA principals.  They agreed that it was good to have active and retired SAs meet and discuss things and compare notes.

 

The AFSA newsletter will probably have some photos of the event.  Once I learn how to transfer the pix I took from my IPhone  (still new to me)  I will send them out.

 

See you the next time.

 

Ray

[November 25, 2014] A Renaissance of Fraud

A renaissance of fraud

As a former IRS Criminal Investigation (CI) special agent, I was in the business of hunting down fraudsters, big time white collar swindlers and crooks.  The sport was not for the financially sleuthing faint of heart.  Those worthy of capture and prosecution camouflaged themselves well with guile, charm and a heavy veneer of bogus money trails.  As dedicated hunters, we studied and attempted to predict their behavior, sought out their feeding grounds and patiently stalked them before they committed another financial crime.  The prized trophy for bagging a big time fraudster was the personal satisfaction they would no longer victimize others.     

Not to discount the horrific experience of being burglarized or mugged, but having your life savings pilfered by someone you thought you could trust often leaves a much deeper emotional scar scare.  In my experience I have seen that  these victims are haunted for the rest of their lives and rarely recover financially or psychologically. 

Over the years as a special agent and later as a senior leader in the organization, I have become more attune to swindler activity.  Like most in this line of work, you begin to develop a sixth sense.  I say this to qualify what I am about to tell you:  People can become jaded.  I am not above being influenced by years of forcing certain optics.  I readily admit I may have developed a bias toward labeling individuals as fraudsters.  So, you be the judge if my observations are seen through skeptical lenses.  

Recently, I have become alarmed by several converging trends: First, the exponential advancement of opportunities that fraudster can feed and breed on; second, the explosive growth in the size and quantity of fraud criminal cases; and third, the rapidly shrinking resource pool of investigators and prosecutors tasked to combat sophisticated financial crimes.   We are in a renaissance of fraud where it has never been easier to commit financial thievery and get away with it.

Opportunities abound

Leaving a cash register drawer unlocked clearly opens a business up to the crime of embezzlement.   With fraud, sometimes our cash register drawers are left wide open by gullibility, greed or desperation.   Where opportunities exist, committing fraud can be easier than you think.  There was a case out of my office a while back where a man put an ad in the paper advertising that if you sent him he would send you an educational package that would teach you how to make a ,000 a week.  Several victims sent him checks and as promised, the crook sent them his secret to success:  A brief letter telling them to put an ad in the paper asking people to send you like he did.  

America has had a long history of swindlers peddling schemes and snake oil.  Up to the late 1990s, these fraudsters had brick and mortar constraints that limited how far their scheme could propagate.  For instance, the size of a telemarketing pump and dump scam was limited to the size of the boiler room; a mass mailer peddling a nonexistent pain cure was limited by the cost of mailing and corresponding and an infomercial hawking fake gold mines had a steep barrier to entry given the cost of production and air time.   

But overall popularity of the Internet changed everything.  Unimaginable opportunities now exist that make the transactional cost of duping victims much cheaper and it can be done in the anonymity of cyberspace.  Plus, the traits of the fraudster  (guile and charm) can be vastly extenuated.   When it comes to the Internet, swindlers can look like a well-established business just with a little web design window dressing.  

The Internet has allowed for the phenomena of micro fraud where it is now very cost effective to scam hundreds of thousands for small amounts.  My office worked a case where the fraudster scammed hundreds of millions of dollars from many individuals who each lost between 25 to 150 dollars.  Imagine the possibilities of the newspaper ad scam I discussed earlier, when transferring that scam into spam emails and using anonymynizer websites.   And with this new cyber-global presence, fraudsters can reach victims anywhere in the world from the convenience of their Internet café.  With the Internet the world is their oyster.     

Our zeal to make transactions convenient and seamless through technology has opened new opportunities that fraudsters are aggressively exploiting.  Identity theft is a glaring example of this.  In addition to credit card fraud, billions of dollars have been paid  in recent years to crooks that steal the identity and social security number of unsuspecting taxpayers and then file online tax returns.  It has become so lucrative that street gangs and other criminal groups have aggressively made it one of their core income streams.  What makes it attractive and safer for the crooks is that the refunds can be received on  prepaid debit cards so there is no banking money trail. 

The IRS is doing yeoman’s work combating the problem but they have never experienced such an epidemic of identity theft-related crimes.  And all of this is primarily the result from elected officials expecting that refunds be conveniently paid as quickly as 24 to 48 hours.  Also, the IRS is not the only government agency experiencing epic identity theft.  Any local, state or federal government program that pays  funds utilizing prepaid debit cards has been under attack by identity thieves.  We brought down a small group of individuals who were able to obtain 4 million dollars in bogus state unemployment benefits all paid on prepaid cards.  

In addition to technology and convenience considerations, changing demographics also opens new opportunities.  As the population  gets older, baby boomers are retiring with nest eggs smaller than they envisioned and out of desperation some seek more aggressive, unconventional investment opportunities.   As people age they become more trusting and forgetful and this all plays out well for enhancing fraudsters’ feeding grounds.    

Zombie fraudsters attack

When I began my career, big cases  were not handed to you on a silver platter.  You had to work for it, dig deep and turn over a fair amount of financial rocks.  Case development was the order of the day to become a good special agent.  But there has been a noticeable shift in recent years.  Agents no longer need to forage constantly under deep embedded stones to find a quality lead.  This is because big cases have been oozing up from under them lately.  

Right before I retired, the aggregate value of investigations under my direction over the recent years approached a billion dollars.  Many of these cases were well over million and there were more than a few over 0 million.  Inflation cannot explain the huge variance in inventory from a similar sized field office just a decade ago.  All over the country, referrals, tips and passionate pleas from victims are coming to white collar criminal investigators much faster than they can intake.  Call me jaded but something is amiss on the financial highways of America.  It is almost as if there is a fraudster zombie uprising. 

Budget constraints at the local, state and federal level also play into this.  There are fewer investigators and prosecutors experienced in sophisticated financial crimes than in years past.  For instance, IRS CI is approaching 1,976’s staffing levels.  This should be a large canary in the cold mine because IRS special agents are often relied upon by federal prosecutors to put together the most sophisticated financial investigations.   

To manage the overflowing financial crime inventory with smaller resources, many leads that might have been worked years ago are now passed up for even bigger ones.  Prosecutors are forced to set higher dollar criteria as a means to ensure the most impactful criminals are adjudicated.  The results are disconcerting.  It is not uncommon for a quarter million dollar fraudster to be thrown back into Swindler Lake— much too small of a catch in many major cities given the current financial investigator’s fishing size limit.  In some areas if the fraud is less than a million dollars there is a chance it probably would not be prosecuted if bigger fish have already been hauled up onto the boat. 

Keep in mind, sophisticated white collar cases take much more time to reel in and mount on the prosecution wall.  The effort is more akin to deep sea marlin fishing than quickly pulling up a catfish with a net.  These big cases are huge resource drains often taking a team of agents and attorneys to bring it to trial.  With a priority to ensure public safety, many smaller local and state police departments cannot fund adequate white collar investigative units capable of taking on big financial cases so they defer them to federal criminal agencies. 

The Romans have a saying:  Money is like seawater.  The more you drink, the thirstier you get.  Fraudsters vividly prove this axiom.  Unlike violent criminals there is a high recidivism rate as fraudsters get older.  They often become more egregious and rapacious in their financial thievery, attempting to quench their greed thirst.  It is not uncommon to see Ponzi schemes being perpetrated by folks in their seventies and even some in their eighties.    

Rationalization

What prevents most of us from committing fraud is our moral compass.   It is revealing that studies on cheating show that more than an insignificant portion of us would stray ethically if we could rationalize the action.  The significant factor in rationalization has to do with crowd mentality.  If you perceive everyone is doing it, you feel more comfortable rationalizing it as acceptable behavior.  The mortgage crisis hinged partly on the fact that a lot of people rationalized it was okay to submit a mortgage loan puffed up with financial fiction.  In their mind everybody was doing it and nobody got in trouble for it.  As more people get away with fraud, there will be those who rationalize that it is okay to follow the crowd, especially if their incentive is driven by financial desperation.  

Rationalization is often enhanced if a person has no emotional attachment to the victim.  This is where it gets scary.  As I mentioned, the Internet has opened up tremendous opportunities not only for homegrown fraudsters but also for nefarious foreign groups such as terrorists, transnational criminal organizations and kleptocracies, who could not care less about people’s way of life.   Our enemies are also engaged in financial warfare. 

What does this mean for AML compliance?

With recent heavy fines in the hundreds of millions levied on financial institutions, the government has made it clear that their expectation of what AML programs should do is detect and report financial crimes—fraud.   Law enforcement cannot keep up with the exponential growth of financial crime cases; therefore, financial institutions are being asked to do more in the fight against financial fraud.  This will mean AML programs will have to be retooled and financial institutions will undoubtedly be faced with new challenges and expectations.   

The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) was created in the 1970s to monitor and report financial transactions occurring in the underground currency-based, non-banked economy.  Much of the AML apparatus focuses on detecting traditional, currency base suspicious activity. The criminal world has vastly changed since then.  Most significant financial crimes are non-currency based.   Fraudsters often do not avail themselves to transactional currency-based money laundering techniques used by cartels and other drug trade organizations.  For instance, financial intuitions are now suffering a wave of fraudsters attempting to clear credit or debit card transactions relating to a multitude of frauds schemes.   And there are fraudsters that just use financial institutions simply to enjoy their non currency funds rather than launder their money. 

So, when it comes to detecting fraudsters it is mainly about due diligence protocols and attempting to keep abreast of the latest fraud schemes.  There is a myth that many people harbor: Only the stupid, greedy and gullible fall for fraud schemes.  Let me assure you, this is not my law enforcement career experience.   Fraudsters are genetically coded to be uber-charmers, masters at spinning lies that appear to be etched in stone facts.  I have seen doctors, lawyers, engineers and college professors collapse into their trickery.  If these  highly educated professionals can fall prey imagine how difficult it will be for AML personnel to detect their fraud?  

There is a high level of subjectivity involved in assessing whether someone is engaged in fraud, especially if there is thick coat of sophistication.   Moving forward, we have to wrestle with the fact, we will not catch them all.  The cracks in the chicanery wall may only become apparent late into the fraud scheme and often after there has been a public notification of conviction.     

Even reaching out to victims to verify fraud might be less fruitful than you would think.  It is not uncommon for a victim who lost significant funds to be in a state of denial even after they are told of a criminal investigation.   As a coping mechanism, some refused to face and admit they were duped.  I have seen this even with highly educated professionals.  There are also times when the fraudster makes side deals with desperate victims.  The victims agree to vouch on the merits of the investment in exchange for their money back.    

It is not unheard of for wishful thinking investment entrepreneurs to break bad when faced with economic reality, especially if they are enjoying the high life.  This often happens in economic downturn of the underlying investment.  The mortgage crisis incubated a lot of breaking bad scenarios.  People faced with having to tell investors they lost everything just continued to accept investment contributions.  This situation can be particularly challenging for AML compliance because the initial due diligence would have yielded a legitimate profile.

You have to know the schemes to detect the schemes.   Because technology has increased the creation velocity of new scams, AML departments are faced with the herculean challenge of how to effectively deliver training on emerging fraud trends.  This is where law enforcement needs to step in and proactively provide fraud situational awareness.  AML professionals are at a disadvantage in identifying fraud  if they are not briefed on the detailed mechanics of current schemes.  It is one thing to tell someone to assemble a clock; it is another thing to take it apart and show them how  each piece fits together.  This is already happening to some degree in many cities with Financial Fraud Task Forces reaching out to financial institutions.   Budget constraints dramatically hampered the ability of law enforcement to attend industry conferences to share their subject-matter expertise.   To mitigate this, perhaps local ACAMS chapters could also serve as a platform to host local, state and federal law enforcement so they can profile recent cases and trends. 

Conclusion

For the past year I have been engaged in reality checks with colleagues as a means to gauge my jadedness.  Invariably my observation mirrors theirs: Many of us believe there has never been a time when the chances of you being a victim of fraud are so great.  Given this, we all need to gain situational awareness of our financial surroundings, not only for ourselves but also for our family and friends, especially the elderly ones that might be more vulnerable.   Financial sharks are stealth enough to swim into calm shallow waters without detection.   This was painfully demonstrated to me recently.

Not long ago, I received a call from my cousin informing me that my elderly aunt had lost her entire retirement nest egg to a fraudster.  The scheme entrapped thousands of elderly victims who lost their life savings to what they thought was a prudent, safe investment offering reasonable returns from someone they trusted for years.  As I questioned my cousin on what happened, I painfully realized the fraudsters had played them well, covered their tracks and left little openings for a strong, quick encompassing prosecution. It was a scenario I have seen time and time again but now it hit home.  The scheme turned out to be well over a half a billion dollars and probably the largest in the state.

My guess is that the same sophisticated subterfuge used on the victims to keep them at bay was also applied to the financial intuitions.  The story profoundly embeds into me the belief that it could happen to anyone and to any financial institution.  No matter how much we build our programs to detect financial fraud, the resourceful predator fraudsters will always find ways to swim through the nets.    And so I become even more jaded; we may never be able to build the perfect fraudster mouse trap.  

 

Paul Camacho, vice president of AML Compliance, Station Casinos LLC, Las Vegas, NV, USA,

[November 17, 2014] AML article by Paul Camacho

Renaissance

of FRAUD

Goran Bogicevic / Shutterstock.com

ACAMS TODAY | JUNE–AUGUST 2014 | ACAMS.ORG | ACAMSTODAY.ORG 33

AML CHALLENGES

As a former IRS Criminal Investigation

(CI) special agent, I was in the

business of hunting down fraudsters,

big-time white-collar swindlers and

crooks. The sport was not for the financially

sleuthing faint of heart. Those worthy of

capture and prosecution camouflaged themselves

well with guile, charm and a heavy

veneer of bogus money trails. As dedicated

hunters, we studied and attempted to predict

their behavior, sought out their feeding

grounds and patiently stalked them before

they committed another financial crime. The

prized trophy for bagging a big time fraudster

was the personal satisfaction they would no

longer victimize others.

Not to discount the horrific experience of

being burglarized or mugged, but having your

life savings pilfered by someone you thought

you could trust often leaves a much deeper

emotional scar. In my experience I have seen

that these victims are haunted for the rest of

their lives and rarely recover financially or

psychologically.

Over the years as a special agent and later

as a senior leader in the organization, I have

become more attune to swindler activity.

Like most in this line of work, you begin to

develop a sixth sense. I say this to qualify

what I am about to tell you: People can

become jaded. I am not above being influenced

by years of forcing certain optics. I

readily admit I may have developed a bias

toward labeling individuals as fraudsters. So,

you be the judge if my observations are seen

through skeptical lenses.

Recently, I have become alarmed by several

converging trends: First, the exponential

advancement of opportunities that fraudster

can feed and breed on; second, the explosive

growth in the size and quantity of fraud criminal

cases; and third, the rapidly shrinking

resource pool of investigators and prosecutors

tasked to combat sophisticated financial

crimes. We are in a renaissance of fraud

where it has never been easier to commit

financial thievery and get away with it.

Opportunities abound

Leaving a cash register drawer unlocked

clearly opens a business up to the crime of

embezzlement. With fraud, sometimes our

cash register drawers are left wide open

by gullibility, greed or desperation. Where

opportunities exist, committing fraud can be

easier than you think. There was a case out

of my office a while back where a man put

an ad in the paper advertising that if you sent

him he would send you an educational

package that would teach you how to make

a ,000 a week. Several victims sent him

checks and as promised, the crook sent them

his secret to success: A brief letter telling

them to put an ad in the paper asking people

to send you like he did.

America has had a long history of swindlers

peddling schemes and snake oil. Up to the

late 1990s, these fraudsters had brick and

mortar constraints that limited how far their

scheme could propagate. For instance, the

size of a telemarketing pump and dump scam

was limited to the size of the boiler room; a

mass mailer peddling a nonexistent pain cure

was limited by the cost of mailing and corresponding

and an infomercial hawking fake

gold mines had a steep barrier to entry given

the cost of production and air time.

But overall popularity of the Internet

changed everything. Unimaginable opportunities

now exist that make the transactional

cost of duping victims much cheaper and

it can be done in the anonymity of cyberspace.

Plus, the traits of the fraudster (guile

and charm) can be vastly extenuated. When

it comes to the Internet, swindlers can look

like a well-established business just with a

little web design window dressing.

The Internet has allowed for the phenomena

of micro fraud where it is now very cost

effective to scam hundreds of thousands

for small amounts. My office worked a case

where the fraudster scammed hundreds of

millions of dollars from many individuals

who each lost between 25 to 150 dollars.

Imagine the possibilities of the newspaper ad

scam I discussed earlier, when transferring

that scam into spam emails and using anonymynizer

websites. And with this new cyberglobal

presence, fraudsters can reach victims

anywhere in the world from the convenience

of their Internet café. With the Internet the

world is their oyster.

Our zeal to make transactions convenient

and seamless through technology has

opened new opportunities that fraudsters

are aggressively exploiting. Identity theft

is a glaring example of this. In addition to

credit card fraud, billions of dollars have

been paid in recent years to crooks that steal

the identity and social security number of

unsuspecting taxpayers and then file online

tax returns. It has become so lucrative that

street gangs and other criminal groups

have aggressively made it one of their core

income streams. What makes it attractive

and safer for the crooks is that the refunds

can be received on prepaid debit cards so

there is no banking money trail.

34 ACAMS TODAY | JUNE–AUGUST 2014 | ACAMS.ORG | ACAMSTODAY.ORG

AML CHALLENGES

The IRS is

doing yeoman’s

work combating the

problem but they have

never experienced such

an epidemic of identity theft-related

crimes. And all of this is primarily the

result from elected officials expecting that

refunds be conveniently paid as quickly as

24 to 48 hours. Also, the IRS is not the only

government agency experiencing epic identity

theft. Any local, state or federal government

program that pays funds utilizing

prepaid debit cards has been under attack

by identity thieves. We brought down a small

group of individuals who were able to obtain

4 million dollars in bogus state unemployment

benefits all paid on prepaid cards.

In addition to technology and convenience

considerations, changing demographics also

opens new opportunities. As the population

gets older, baby boomers are retiring with

nest eggs smaller than they envisioned and

out of desperation some seek more aggressive,

unconventional investment opportunities.

As people age they become more trusting

and forgetful and this all plays out well for

enhancing fraudsters’ feeding grounds.

Zombie fraudsters attack

When I began my career, big cases were not

handed to you on a silver platter. You had

to work for it, dig deep and turn over a

fair amount of financial rocks. Case

development was the order of the

day to become a good special agent.

But there has been a noticeable

shift in recent years. Agents

no longer need to forage

constantly under

deep embedded

stones to find

a quality lead.

This is because

big cases have

been oozing up

from under them

lately.

Right before I

retired, the aggregate

value of investigations

under my

direction over the recent

years approached a billion

dollars. Many of these cases

were well over million and

there were more than a few over 0

million. Inflation cannot explain the huge

variance in inventory from a similar sized

field office just a decade ago. All over the

country, referrals, tips and passionate pleas

from victims are coming to white collar

criminal investigators much faster than

they can intake. Call me jaded, but something

is amiss on the financial highways of

America. It is almost as if there is a fraudster

zombie uprising.

Budget constraints at the local, state and

federal level also play into this. There

are fewer investigators and prosecutors

experienced in sophisticated financial

crimes than in years past. For instance,

IRS CI is approaching 1970s staffing

levels. This should be a large canary in

the coal mine because IRS special agents

are often relied upon by federal prosecutors

to put together the most sophisticated

financial investigations.

To manage the overflowing financial crime

inventory with smaller resources, many leads

that might have been worked years ago are

now passed up for even bigger ones. Prosecutors

are forced to set higher dollar criteria

as a means to ensure the most impactful

criminals are adjudicated. The results are

disconcerting. It is not uncommon for a

quarter million dollar fraudster to be thrown

back into Swindler Lake — much too small

of a catch in many major cities given the

current financial investigator’s fishing size

limit. In some areas if the fraud is less than

a million dollars there is a chance it probably

would not be prosecuted if bigger fish have

already been hauled up onto the boat.

Keep in mind, sophisticated white collar

cases take much more time to reel in and

mount on the prosecution wall. The effort

is more akin to deep sea marlin fishing

than quickly pulling up a catfish with a net.

These big cases are huge resource drains

often taking a team of agents and attorneys

to bring it to trial. With a priority to ensure

public safety, many smaller local and state

police departments cannot fund adequate

white collar investigative units capable of

taking on big financial cases so they defer

them to federal criminal agencies.

The Romans have a saying: Money is like

seawater. The more you drink, the thirstier

you get. Fraudsters vividly prove this axiom.

Unlike violent criminals there is a high recidivism

rate as fraudsters get older. They often

become more egregious and rapacious in their

financial thievery, attempting to quench their

greed thirst. It is not uncommon to see Ponzi

schemes being perpetrated by folks in their

seventies and even some in their eighties.

Rationalization

What prevents most of us from committing

fraud is our moral compass. It is revealing

that studies on cheating show that more than

an insignificant portion of us would stray

ethically if we could rationalize the action.

The significant factor in rationalization has

to do with crowd mentality. If you perceive

everyone is doing it, you feel more comfortable

rationalizing it as acceptable behavior.

The mortgage crisis hinged partly on the fact

that a lot of people rationalized it was okay

to submit a mortgage loan puffed up with

financial fiction. In their mind everybody was

doing it and nobody got in trouble for it. As

more people get away with fraud, there will

be those who rationalize that it is okay to

follow the crowd, especially if their incentive

is driven by financial desperation.

Rationalization is often enhanced if a person

has no emotional attachment to the victim.

This is where it gets scary. As I mentioned,

the Internet has opened up tremendous

opportunities not only for homegrown

fraudsters but also for nefarious foreign

ACAMS TODAY | JUNE–AUGUST 2014 | ACAMS.ORG | ACAMSTODAY.ORG 35

AML CHALLENGES

groups such as terrorists, transnational

criminal organizations and kleptocracies,

who could not care less about people’s way

of life. Our enemies are also engaged in

financial warfare.

What does this mean for AML

compliance?

With recent heavy fines in the hundreds

of millions levied on financial institutions,

the government has made it clear that their

expectation of what AML programs should

do is detect and report financial crimes —

fraud. Law enforcement cannot keep up with

the exponential growth of financial crime

cases; therefore, financial institutions are

being asked to do more in the fight against

financial fraud. This will mean AML programs

will have to be retooled and financial institutions

will undoubtedly be faced with new

challenges and expectations.

The Bank Secrecy Act (BSA) was created

in the 1970s to monitor and report financial

transactions occurring in the underground

currency-based, non-banked economy. Much

of the AML apparatus focuses on detecting

traditional, currency base suspicious activity.

The criminal world has vastly changed since

then. Most significant financial crimes are

non-currency based. Fraudsters often do

not avail themselves to transactional currency-

based money laundering techniques used

by cartels and other drug trade organizations.

For instance, financial intuitions are now

suffering a wave of fraudsters attempting to

clear credit or debit card transactions relating

to a multitude of frauds schemes. And there

are fraudsters that just use financial institutions

simply to enjoy their non currency

funds rather than launder their money.

So, when it comes to detecting fraudsters it

is mainly about due diligence protocols and

attempting to keep abreast of the latest fraud

schemes. There is a myth that many people

harbor: Only the stupid, greedy and gullible

fall for fraud schemes. Let me assure you,

this is not my law enforcement career experience.

Fraudsters are genetically coded to

be uber-charmers, masters at spinning lies

that appear to be etched in stone facts. I have

seen doctors, lawyers, engineers and college

professors collapse into their trickery. If

these highly educated professionals can fall

prey imagine how difficult it will be for AML

personnel to detect their fraud?

There is a high level of subjectivity involved

in assessing whether someone is engaged

in fraud, especially if there is thick coat of

sophistication. Moving forward, we have to

wrestle with the fact, we will not catch them

all. The cracks in the chicanery wall may only

become apparent late into the fraud scheme

and often after there has been a public notification

of conviction.

Even reaching out to victims to verify

fraud might be less fruitful than you would

think. It is not uncommon for a victim

who lost significant funds to be in a state

of denial even after they are told of a criminal

investigation. As a coping mechanism,

some refused to face and admit they were

duped. I have seen this even with highly

educated professionals. There are also

times when the fraudster makes side deals

with desperate victims. The victims agree

to vouch on the merits of the investment in

exchange for their money back.

It is not unheard of for wishful thinking

investment entrepreneurs to break bad when

faced with economic reality, especially if

they are enjoying the high life. This often

happens in economic downturn of the underlying

investment. The mortgage crisis incubated

a lot of breaking bad scenarios. People

faced with having to tell investors they lost

everything just continued to accept investment

contributions. This situation can be

particularly challenging for AML compliance

because the initial due diligence would have

yielded a legitimate profile.

You have to know the schemes to detect the

schemes. Because technology has increased

the creation velocity of new scams, AML

departments are faced with the herculean

challenge of how to effectively deliver

training on emerging fraud trends. This is

where law enforcement needs to step in

and proactively provide fraud situational

awareness. AML professionals are at a disadvantage

in identifying fraud if they are not

briefed on the detailed mechanics of current

schemes. It is one thing to tell someone to

assemble a clock; it is another thing to take

it apart and show them how each piece

fits together. This is already happening to

some degree in many cities with Financial

Fraud Task Forces reaching out to financial

institutions. Budget constraints dramatically

hampered the ability of law enforcement to

attend industry conferences to share their

subject-matter expertise. To mitigate this,

perhaps local ACAMS chapters could also

serve as a platform to host local, state and

federal law enforcement so they can profile

recent cases and trends.

Conclusion

For the past year I have been engaged in

reality checks with colleagues as a means to

gauge my jadedness. Invariably my observation

mirrors theirs: Many of us believe there

has never been a time when the chances

of you being a victim of fraud are so great.

Given this, we all need to gain situational

awareness of our financial surroundings,

not only for ourselves but also for our family

and friends, especially the elderly ones that

might be more vulnerable. Financial sharks

are stealth enough to swim into calm shallow

waters without detection. This was painfully

demonstrated to me recently.

Not long ago, I received a call from my

cousin informing me that my elderly aunt

had lost her entire retirement nest egg to

a fraudster. The scheme entrapped thousands

of elderly victims who lost their

life savings to what they thought was a

prudent, safe investment offering reasonable

returns from someone they trusted for

years. As I questioned my cousin on what

happened, I painfully realized the fraudsters

had played them well, covered their

tracks and left little openings for a strong,

quick encompassing prosecution. It was a

scenario I have seen time and time again

but now it hit home. The scheme turned out

to be well over a half a billion dollars and

probably the largest in the state.

My guess is that the same sophisticated

subterfuge used on the victims to keep them

at bay was also applied to the financial intuitions.

The story profoundly embeds into me

the belief that it could happen to anyone and

to any financial institution. No matter how

much we build our programs to detect financial

fraud, the resourceful predator fraudsters

will always find ways to swim through

the nets. And so I become even more jaded;

we may never be able to build the perfect

fraudster mouse trap.

Paul Camacho, vice president of AML

Compliance, Station Casinos LLC, Las

Vegas, NV, USA, [email protected]

com

Most significant

financial crimes are

non-currency based

[November 17, 2014] Article on FEHB and Medicare

Here's another article on FEHB and Medicare.

 

By Tammy Flanagan

In 2015, Medicare Part B premiums will be 4.90 per month per person, or ,258.80 a year. The good news is that’s unchanged from this year. The bad news is that feds who will turn 65 in 2015 will need to make a decision about whether or not to enroll in Part B and pay this additional premium on top of what they already pay for Federal Employees’ Health Benefits Program coverage.

Let’s look at some of the advantages of adding Part B and some ideas to how to make the dual coverage more affordable. But before we begin, here’s a quick overview of Medicare’s four parts:

  • Part A covers hospital care for overnight stays, care in a skilled nursing facility, hospice care and home health services. There is no premium for Part A as long as you or your spouse has paid the Medicare tax during employment. All federal employees have paid this tax since 1983. The military has been covered by Social Security payroll taxes since 1957.
  • Part B covers medically necessary services and supplies that are needed to diagnose or treat an illness or medical condition and that meet accepted standards of medical practice. Part B covers some preventative care, but not all.
  • Part C is a collection of plans under the Medicare Advantage umbrella. These plans sometimes cover services that aren’t deemed medically necessary under Medicare. They may also offer extra coverage for services like vision, hearing, dental and other health or wellness programs. If you stay enrolled in a FEHBP plan, then you would not need a Medicare Part C plan. If you decide to enroll in a Medicare Advantage Plan, you have the option of suspending your FEHBP coverage if you are retired from the federal government.
  • Part D is Medicare’s prescription drug coverage. If you have FEHBP, you will not need to enroll in Part D, because your FEHBP plan will cover your prescriptions as well and often better than a Part D plan. If you find you’re paying a lot of money out of pocket for copayments on your prescriptions, you may consider enrollment in a Part D plan or changing your FEHBP enrollment to something that is more cost-effective in covering such expenses.

I can think of only one reason not to enroll in Medicare Part A when you turn 65: If you want to contribute to a health savings account. Part B, though, is a different, more complicated, story.

Cost Conundrum

The dilemma with Part B mainly comes down to cost. There is a monthly premium that you need to pay per person, in addition to your FEHBP premium. And if you are a wealthier 65-year-old, the premiums are higher.

Not only is it expensive to enroll in Medicare Part B, but you may not get your money’s worth. Of course, that could be viewed as a good thing, because it would mean you were healthy. And lest you think you should just wait to sign up, there’s a penalty if you delay your enrollment to a time when you’re more likely to benefit from the additional coverage. Part B premiums go up by 10 percent for every year you delay enrollment past your 65th birthday.

Still, it’s usually to your advantage to delay Part B enrollment past age 65 if you're covered under a group health plan based on current employment. This includes FEHBP if the premiums are being deducted from your paycheck and not your CSRS or FERS retirement benefit. This exception also applies to your spouse, who may be covered under your FEHBP if you are still working for the federal government.

If you delayed Part B enrollment because you were still covered by a health plan through current employment, you have a special enrollment period to sign up for Parts A and B any time as long as you or your spouse (or family member, if you're disabled) is working. You also have an eight-month special enrollment period to sign up for Parts A and B that starts the month after the employment stops or the group health plan insurance based on current employment ends, whichever happens first. Usually, you don't pay a late enrollment penalty if you sign up during a special enrollment period.

If you missed your general enrollment at 65 and you are no longer employed and covered by current employment health insurance, then it’s time to consider enrollment in Part B.

Dual Enrollment Advantages

There are three main advantages to having dual enrollment under FEHBP and Medicare Parts A and B:

  • Many FEHB plans will waive or lower your out-of-pocket expenses (deductibles, copayments and coinsurance) when Medicare is the primary payer (usually after you are retired).
  • Medicare caters to the needs of the elderly. Some services are covered more generously by Medicare than FEHBP and when combined with FEHBP coverage often result in 100 percent coverage.
  • If you’re covered by both Medicare and FEHBP, you have some security: There’s always the possibility that one or the other plans changes in the future, but even if that happens, you’ll be able to fall back on the fact that you are covered for most health care expenses that you might face.

If you’re going to turn 65 next year, this open season (which runs through Dec. 8) might be a good time to consider which FEHBP plan will work best with Medicare. It may not be the same one you’ve been using throughout your federal career.

To evaluate the coordination of coverage between FEHBP and Medicare, review Section 9 of your FEHBP brochure. Narrow your selection to a few plans in your area that may be well suited to your needs. Also, GEHA, an FEHBP plan provider, has produced a YouTube seriesthat provides an overview of how all FEHBP plans coordinate with Medicare. And the National Active and Retired Federal Employees of New York has a website on the subject.

As I mentioned last week, I am participating in several open season events where I will be discussing Medicare and FEHBP. Consider signing up for the three-part webinar series that I’m conducting with Micah Shilanski. The last part is specifically dedicated to Medicare and FEHBP. You also can tune in to the series of “For Your Benefit” programs on Federal News Radio that I co-host with Bob Leins. These shows air on Mondays at 10 a.m. on AM 1500 in the Washington area and also are archived online. Upcoming open season programs will include:

  • Nov. 17: SAMBA FEHBP and FLTCIP
  • Nov. 24: Aetna FEHBP
  • Dec. 1: Kaiser FEHBP
  • Dec. 8: Open Season Wrap-Up

Also, feel free to use the comments section below to ask your questions about FEHBP choices. I’ll take up some of them in a future column.

(Image via Nata-Lia/Shutterstock.com)

By Tammy Flanagan

[November 17, 2014] Sad News: Passing of Linda Graziani

 

From: Weber Richard 
Sent: Friday, November 14, 2014 5:36 PM
To: CI EMP
Subject: Passing of S/A Linda Graziani

 

It is with deep sadness that I inform you of the sudden passing of Senior Analyst/Special Agent Linda Graziani.   

 

Linda suffered an aneurism Tuesday and underwent brain surgery early Wednesday morning and was in the Intensive Care Unit.  Unfortunately, she was unable to recover and passed away Thursday afternoon.   Linda started with IRS-CI in June 1995 as a special agent in the San Antonio office.  She went on to be a SSA in El Paso and Dallas, the RAC of the Austin SDC and in 2013 was selected as a Senior Analyst in RPE.  She had many friends in CI and those who were close to her describe her as extremely talented, professional and passionate about her job.  Linda was also a single parent and put herself through college, earning an MBA.  Her loss is tragic to her family and our CI family.

 

Please keep her family and friends in your thoughts and prayers as we support and show our respect to her son Michael, grandson Daxton, her parents and siblings.

The numerous offices Linda touched throughout her career, as well as our entire agency, will mourn her loss and will greatly miss her friendship and tremendous contributions to IRS-CI.  It is incredibly sad to lose her as a member of our family.

 

Details regarding funeral services will follow.

 

Rich

 

Richard Weber

Chief, IRS - Criminal Investigation

(202) 317 - 3200

 

[November 06, 2014] Sad News: Passin of AFSA-IRS Member Bob Freeland

Former IRS S/A “Bob” Freeland from Pawley’s Island SC and long time AFSA member suffered a sudden and fatal heart attack on 9/16/14.  His obituary appeared in the Myrtle Beach Sun News of 11/5/14.   Bob became a US Army contract employee re a citizen’s goodwill program in Iraq after retiring from CID.  Bob was a guest speaker at a  AFSA Convention and led an effort for AFSA members to donate surplus personal hygiene products for active duty military personnel.   Bob’s obituary recommended that donations should be directed to any recognized veteran’s fund or family assistance program.

[November 03, 2014] Sad News: Passin of Harry Heckert

Harold R. "Harry" Heckert

August 14, 1940 - October 30, 2014

 

Harold "Harry" R. Heckert (S.A. (Ret.)), 74, of Naperville, IL, passed away on Thursday, October 30, 2014, after a two year battle with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS).

Beloved husband of Virginia "Ginny" Heckert for 48 years, loving father of Christine (Mike) Cody and Laura Rewerts, devoted grandpa to Michael, Maggie, Ethan, Veronica, Alex and Nick.

He was preceded in death by his parents, Harold D. and Bernice A. Heckert, originally from the East Side of Chicago.

Harry was a retired Special Agent with the U.S. Departments of Treasury and Defense and also a U.S. Navy veteran.

Funeral Information

A Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated Saturday, November 15, 9:30 AM at SS. Peter & Paul Catholic Church, 36 N. Ellsworth St., Naperville.

A private interment will follow at SS. Peter & Paul Cemetery, Naperville, IL.

Arrangements by Friedrich-Jones Funeral Home & Cremation Services, Naperville, IL.

For more information, please call 630-355-0213.

Donations Information

In lieu of flowers, memorials to: SS. Peter & Paul Catholic Church, 36 N. Ellsworth St., Naperville, IL 60540, (630)355-1081,www.sspeterandpaul.net

Donations Link:

SS. Peter & Paul Catholic Church

Florists and Heart Felt Gifts


http://www.friedrichjones.com/obits/obituaries.php/obitID/566700/Harold-R-Harry-Heckert

[September 15, 2014] Randy Gregory Softball Tournament

The 2nd Annual

Randy Gregory Softball Tournament

Saturday, September 27, 2014

(rain or shine)

9:00am-6:00pm

CCBC - Catonsville

800 South Rolling Road, Catonsville, MD, 21228

entry fee for each player/Team Rosters and Money due to Kathy Montemorra by Friday, September 19th

Individual Players will gladly be placed on a team!

If you aren’t a softball player, no problem, come out and enjoy the day with Randy!

 

Hot Dogs, Chips, Water, Gatorade & Sweets will be provided

Raffles, too!

Donations are appreciated!!!

Tournament to raise money for our dear friend, colleague & coach!

We have received numerous requests from our CI family across the Country expressing a desire to help Randy Gregory purchase a special computer.  The outpour of caring has been tremendous and we recognize many people will not be able to attend the softball game.   As many of you know, Randy Gregory was a CI Special Agent who was diagnosed with ALS (Lou Gehrig's disease) not quite 3 years ago.  Because of this disease, Randy was forced to retire at a young age.   Our plan is to help him buy a special computer that can read eye movements, thereby allowing him to "speak" through the device.  

 

Mail a check to Toni Weirauch at

PO Box 421

Merrifield, VA  22116

 

Also, Toni has set up an account at Bank of America:

 

Toni Marie Weirauch for Randy Gregory

Account Number 2260-1248-92

[September 10, 2014] Sad News: Passing of John M. "Jack" Walsh

Passing of AFSA-IRS Member

John M. "Jack" Walsh

 

John M. "Jack", age 78 years, beloved husband of Mary C. Walsh (nee Johnson) devoted father of Mary Ann (Jeff) Akin, John A. (Michelle) Walsh, Catherine J. (Todd) Kron and James M. Walsh, brother of William Walsh, grandfather of Sara and Rachel Akin; Patrick, Olivia, Mia and Jude Walsh; and Erin Kron, many nieces and nephews in the Chicago area.  As a Special Agent in Chicago with the United States Treasury Department, he successfully investigated Mafia members and the politicians working with them, including the "Don" of Chicago Mafia, and a former Governor of Illinois.  He was an avid waterfowl hunter, making twenty seven trips to Saskatchkewan, Canada, and he spent eighteen years working with Ducks Unlimited and their East Fork Chapter.  He was an active member of the Milford Gun Club.  He will be remembered as a loving husband and parent, a sportsman, a conservationist, and a very good Treasury Agent.  His motto was "Do every job assigned to you the very best you can."  September 6, 2014, residence Summerside.  Mass of Christian Burial at St. Veronica Church,  4473 Mt. Carmel - Tobacco Road on Wednesday September 10th at 12 Noon.  Friends may visit the Church on Wednesday 10:00 A.M. - 12 Noon.  T.P. & White Sons Funeral Home serving the family. 

  

[September 09, 2014] Sad News: Passing of Special Agent Pat Jest


The funeral for Special Agent Pat Jest will be held on Friday, September
12th at 11:00 a.m.  The location is Christian Life Missionary Baptist
Church, 3980 Gillionville Road, Albany GA 31721.  Telephone is (229)
405-1424.

Flowers can be sent to Meadows Funeral Home, 315 S. Madison Street, Albany,
GA 31701.  Telephone is (229) 439-2262.

Cards may be sent to Pat's Family addressed to Ms. Sandra Jest, 1122 Augusta
Drive, Albany, GA 31707.

[September 02, 2014] Sad News: Passing of Denita Jackson


Email from Sadie Towler confirming that Denita Jackson, special agent retired, had passed away.  I have no further details.  I searched for an obituary or an online guest book but found none.


Sadie sent me the information on the services that are listed below in her email.  Services will be on Thursday, Sept 4 at 3:00.  They will be held at:


FOREST LAWN - HOLLYWOOD HILLS
6300 Forest Lawn Drive
Los Angeles, CA 90068
Actual services will be in The Church of the Hills (this is one of several churches in the cemetery)
This is from the Forest Lawn Website:
Service

Last Name First Name Service Type When Start Time Location Where
Jackson Ross Denita Memorial Service Sep 4, 2014 3:00 pm Hollywood Hills Church of the Hills

I don’t recall exactly when Denita retired, but I think she was only 57 or 58 years old .Denita was married, and had a son and a daughter.

[August 29, 2014] Reuters Article Focuses on Budget, Staffing

Exclusive: IRS enforcement agent numbers could drop to lowest levels since 1970s

By Nadia Damouni

 

(Reuters) - Budget pressures at the Internal Revenue Service's Criminal Investigation Division are cutting the number of investigators there to the lowest level in four decades, and officials say the changes are forcing the division to scale back its fight of financial crime.

 

It will also hurt government coffers, they add, since IRS probes can bring in hefty fines.

 

The division investigates a variety of financial misconduct, from tax fraud and money laundering to identity theft, narcotics and counter-terrorism. Federal prosecutors around the country often seek help for cases involving money issues.

 

Recent high-profile investigations include probes into tax evasion by Credit Suisse Group AG (CSGN.VX) and Sudan, Cuba and Iran sanctions violations by BNP Paribas (BNPP.PA), which resulted in settlements of .5 billion and billion, respectively. IRS Criminal Investigation has also been involved in public corruption cases such as the conviction of Jesse Jackson Jr., a former U.S. Representative and the son of civil rights leader Reverend Jesse Jackson Sr., for misusing campaign funds.

 

"The reason they are so important is because of the tax angle," said Ronald Machen Jr., the U.S. Attorney for the District of Columbia, adding that he wished there were more agents. "When you are looking at individuals who steal money, they are always going to want to claim less on their taxes than they have in their various bank accounts."

 

According to data seen by Reuters, the division expects to see the number of special agents decline to 2,130 by fiscal year 2016 due to attrition, down 13 percent from this year. That is despite hiring 48 agents this year. At its peak in 1995, the agency had 3,358 agents.

 

Richard Weber, the division’s chief, carries around a pocket-sized, laminated card with a bar graph showing how his agency has been shrinking over the years as its budget fell. Weber in an interview said his goal is to get the number of special agents back up to at least 3,000.

 

"We cannot continue to lose agents to retirement and not replace them. We are at the same staffing levels that we were at in the 1970s. This is not sustainable," he said.

 

IRS Commissioner John Koskinen in a separate interview said the lack of resources means the unit is starting fewer investigations. "There are fewer cases that you can take," Koskinen said. He did not give specific numbers.

 

Overall, Koskinen estimates, the IRS, through criminal investigations as well as other activities, like audits and collection efforts, brings in billion to billion a year for the government, or 5 to 6 times its budget of about billion. He did not say how much of that was due to the investigative unit, as opposed to audits carried out by another IRS group.

 

TEA PARTY

 

The rise of the Tea Party movement, which professes minimalist government, and an IRS scandal, has made the agency's life tougher.

 

The IRS saw its budget cut by about 0 million last year as a result of the sequester, the automatic spending cuts that were triggered when congressional negotiators failed to reach a budget deal. Koskinen said most other agencies saw their budgets return to pre-sequester levels in the 2014 federal budget, but not the IRS.

 

The IRS also last year revealed that it gave extra scrutiny to conservative "Tea Party" groups applying for nonprofit status. Republicans responded with a storm of criticism and budget cuts, saying the agency was using its budget improperly.

 

Last month, the Republican-controlled U.S. House of Representatives voted to cut the IRS' enforcement budget in 2015 by over billion.

 

Koskinen estimates the latest budget cuts would cost the government somewhere between billion and billion of additional revenues.

 

A proposal in the Senate, controlled by Democrats, would increase the IRS enforcement budget by .6 million -- still 8 million below the Administration's budget request.

 

Weber got some relief this year. After a hiring and travel freeze over the past two years, the division got approval to hire 48 new agents for 2014. In comparison, the FBI got approval to hire 2,000 new agents this year.

 

Half of the 48 IRS criminal investigation